Michael Moore Rendered Unhinged Over Wisconsin, Declares 'This Is War'

Not to worry, Moore promises one of those tranquil conflicts devoid of violence.

What is it about self-proclaimed peace lovers that they are so often bellicose?

Latest example -- the agitprop filmmaker's appearance on MSNBC's Rachel Maddow show last night, coming shortly after the GOP-led Wisconsin state senate voted overwhelmingly in favor of Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to curtail collective bargaining for most public employees. After Maddow introduced Moore and praised his "barnburning speech" in Madison over the weekend, Moore said this (video below page break) --

I just want to say, anybody who lives within driving distance of Madison, Wisc., right now should make their way to the capital. I would love to see thousands of people there right now, there in that capital building, in the rotunda, out on the lawn, whatever it takes. I mean, really, this is really, this is war. This is a class war that's been leveled against the working people of this country and at some point people are going to just have to stand up and say, non-violently, this is enough. We're not taking it anymore. ...

Needless to say, Moore will take full responsibility for any war-like incidents that occur in Wisconsin in the weeks and months ahead at the hand of people who caught the first part of his message -- "this is war" -- but missed his disingenuous disclaimer of wanting to fight "non-violently."

Imagine how Moore and Maddow would bay at the moon if Walker announced "this is war," or if Sarah Palin so much as tweeted it.

Moore also complained about legislation proposed by Michigan Gov. Rick Synder that would give him authority to appoint financial managers to oversee municipalities and school districts facing bankruptcy, with the managers authorized to void contracts and fire local officials --

The fact that they think they can get away with this. I mean, you said it all in the last segment there,  that what happened three years ago in 2008, what happened is they realized they could get away with murder. They realized that they could literally loot the treasury, they could play with people's pension funds on Wall Street, they could destroy the economy, they could essentially do what they could to eliminate the middle class, and there would be no response from the people. There would be no revolt.

Moore disputed claims that Wisconsin and the nation are facing financial crises. "We're not broke," he said, since "we have trillions of dollars in our economy." Problem is, "the money isn't where it needs to be" since the wealthiest one percent of Americans took it out of circulation and aren't being taxed "appropriately."

As a result, Moore claimed, America faces "a revenue problem" and suggested what needs to be done --

MOORE: It's not because there's debt. There's always debt. If you're making car payments, you're in debt. That doesn't mean you're broke. Wisconsin isn't broke. America isn't broke. The money's just not in the people's hands. It's in the hands of the rich, the rich who committed these crimes back on Wall Street and they got away with it. And that's why, you know, I just have these, I brought these, Rachel, this is my prop for the night. ...

MADDOW: Can we have a wide shot of what Mr. Moore has brought with him? (handcuffs shown)

MOORE: I brought these with me. I'd like anybody who works on Wall Street, anybody who works for one of the banks, just take a look at this, OK? (holds up cuffs) 'Cause this is what, this is what's coming, this is what's coming for you. Because the people aren't going to take it anymore. The people are going to demand justice. They're going to 'mand, they're going to demand that your ass is in jail. You've taken our money. We want the money back.

Just out of curiosity, Mr. Moore, do the monsters in your wheelhouse include President Obama -- who voted for the Wall Street bailout while still in the Senate? Hard to get around the complicity there.

How about Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner? You remember, he was president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York when the bottom fell out in 2008. Right in the thick of it, you might say. Shortly thereafter,  Geithner was assigned to distribute TARP funds. Or "loot the treasury," as you put it.

What about House Financial Services Committee chairman Barney Frank, who ignored years of warnings and flashing red lights that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were dangerously overextended? Apparently Frank was distracted by his decade-long personal relationship with a Fannie Mae executive.

None of these scofflaws have to worry, though. Moore's fantasies about handcuffs are strictly limited to Republicans.

Jack Coleman
Jack Coleman
Ex-liberal from People's Republic of Massachusetts