'Today' Can't Get Enough of 'Michelle's Magic' in the UK

NBC's Dawna Friesen, reporting from London on Thursday' "Today" show relayed how "Michelle's Magic," has "dazzled everyone," in the United Kingdom and co-anchor Matt Lauer joined in, as he loved the tacky gift of an iPod to the Queen: "I like this idea. I think it's a, it's a very creative idea to bring her the iPod." Friesen also played down Michelle Obama's gaffe of contact with the Queen, "There was no curtsy, but plenty of easy charm, and it seems Mrs. Obama made another new friend, never mind that royal protocol forbids touching the Queen." This despite the fact that just yesterday, her colleague Keith Miller made a big deal out of past presidential gaffes with the Queen like when George W. Bush winked at Her Royal Highness.

The following is a complete transcript of the full segment as it was aired on the April 2, "Today" show:

MATT LAUER: Now back to London and Great Britain's obsession with First Lady Michelle Obama. NBC's Dawna Friesen is at Buckingham Palace, where people are still buzzing over her visit with the Queen. Not yours, Dawna, but Michelle Obama's. Good morning.

[On screen headline: "American Royalty, England Falls For The First Lady"]

DAWNA FRIESEN: Good morning, Matt. Yes, they're calling it, "Michelle's Magic." Not only has she dazzled everyone with her style here, she seems to have made a new friend at the Palace. In the style stakes, there is no question Michelle Obama is both bold and down to Earth. She brought a suitcase full of American clothes on her first overseas trip as First Lady, this morning appearing at a performance at London's Royal Opera House. Wednesday, shimmering in J. Crew in the morning-

EVE POLLARD, BROADCASTER: When I saw her in the cardigan and secrete skirt, I thought very Jackie Kennedy. But of course, Michelle is so much more than Jackie O. Because there's a great brain. She does a lot of things which I don't think we would have seen Jackie O doing.

FRIESEN: -and for afternoon tea with the Queen, black and white Isabelle Toledo and pearls for a photo that's already dominating the front pages.

POLLARD: I think that photograph will be iconic. I think we will see the black and white outfit of Michelle Obama and the pink dress of the Queen's. These are the two most famous couples in the world.

FRIESEN: There was no curtsy, but plenty of easy charm, and it seems Mrs. Obama made another new friend, never mind that royal protocol forbids touching the Queen. "Now that we've met," the Queen told Mrs. Obama, "let's stay in touch."

INGRID SEWARD, MAJESTY MAGAZINE: From what I saw from the body language, it looked incredibly relaxed for royal standards.

FRIESEN: By evening, she had shed the cardigan, and with a reception reserved for rock stars, headed for a dinner with the so-called First Wives Club - the spouses of the G20 leaders. And though she's showcasing American designers, some Europeans live in hope, one day she'll give them a chance.

LOUIS MARIETTE, CELEBRITY MILLINER: All of us would like to give her that little European touch, the finishing touch.

FRIESEN: Not entirely sure she really needs any help. As one fashion writer here said, "Michelle is a vision." Meredith, Matt?

VIEIRA: Yeah, I don't think she needs help from him, necessarily.

LAUER: That was a quite look though, wasn't it?

VIEIRA: Thanks Donna.

LAUER: I like this idea. I think it's a, it's a very creative idea to bring her the iPod.

VIEIRA: To give the iPod? Yeah?

LAUER: With the video and the music on it. Apparently a lot of the videos on it, from various trips the Queen has made-

VIEIRA: Right, interesting.

LAUER: -to the United States to way back to 1957 and music that would apparently really kind of get her toe-tapping.

VIEIRA: And all these Broadway-, get her toe-tapping?!

LAUER: Toes, I meant to say.

VIEIRA: Oh toes. Yeah she'd probably rock out. Well there are great songs on this. All these great Broadway shows, you know? "Party's Over," that's not one you really want to hear but-

LAUER: "Some Enchanted Evening." One, "Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend."

VIEIRA: That's gotta appeal to her, huh?

LAUER: There ya go, yeah.

VIEIRA: "The Impossible Dream." Some said Obama getting elected was an "impossible dream," he made it.

LAUER: Yeah.

VIEIRA: "Mame."

LAUER: "All That Jazz," "Tomorrow," "Don't Cry For Me Argentina."

VIEIRA: Yeah, yeah. Argentina, yeah.

LAUER: Any ways we hope she, can you see her now? She'd have the headset on?

VIEIRA: Tapping her toes like Matt said. I heard she already had an iPod, which was interesting.

LAUER: Really?

VIEIRA: So this is a second.

Geoffrey Dickens
Geoffrey Dickens
Geoffrey Dickens is the Deputy Research Director at the Media Research Center.