Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham
November 23, 2014, 7:26 PM EST

The Washington Post has already declared the Best Books of 2014, with five weeks left to go. As usual, a pile of liberal favorites, like Capital by French socialist Thomas Piketty were on the list. There was one surprising result: the Post's Top 50 Nonfiction Books has three Obama-cabinet memoirs on the list, including the doorstop by presidential candidate Hillary Clinton:

November 23, 2014, 6:27 AM EST

The Sunday newspaper supplement Parade magazine put Jon Stewart on the cover to provide the typical boosterism for his movie Rosewater, complete with supine praise about his role as "fake" newsman. "Jon Stewart Gets Real" was the headline.

A look at the box office for the first weekend showed Stewart's film was roughly in the same category as Kirk Cameron's evangelical-Christian movie Saving Christmas, although you wouldn't know that since Stewart is the darling of the secularists. Both movies grossed around a million dollars in the first weekend and are showing in around 400 theaters.

November 22, 2014, 7:04 PM EST

NPR and Sen. Ted Cruz are natural enemies. On the Friday News Roundup with national journalists on The Diane Rehm Show, Politico reporter Alex Burns mocked Cruz for acting like a stereotypical bar bully and a man who always seeks to go "as far to the right of his party as possible."

November 22, 2014, 9:43 AM EST

The New Yorker magazine decided to bring the liberal crusade against the “Washington Redskins” name into its cover for Thanksgiving. A defender of the football tradition could easily say this could actually illustrate the white Anglo-Saxon respect for the name, what with the “Go Redskins” cheering and all.

The New Yorker explained, “Many Native Americans have said that the longstanding name of Washington’s N.F.L. franchise is repugnant and offensive to them. Bruce McCall’s cover brings attention, through satire, to what has become the subject of numerous editorials and rallies.”

November 22, 2014, 7:58 AM EST

The liberal myth surrounding the hypercompetent Barack Obama faded long ago, but the liberal myth of “cultural icon” Jon Stewart is only getting stronger. Stewart’s tour of interviews for the new movie he directed, “Rosewater,” has created a parade of flatterers, sycophants, and every other synonym in the thesaurus for “obsequious.”

Roy Sekoff at The Huffington Post stands out by insisting the movie only polishes this walking statue: “In finding this format, in this form, you have become obviously a cultural icon, maybe one of the dominant figures in the political discourse.”

November 21, 2014, 10:44 PM EST

On Wednesday's Washington Journal program on C-SPAN, congressional reporter Christina Marcos of The Hill newspaper slammed the white-maleness of the House Republican leadership and underlined it reflects "these issues of diversity that the Republican Party's been having."

November 21, 2014, 7:01 PM EST

“Ladies and gentlemen – or however you self-identify on the gender identity spectrum – please welcome lovely Glamour Woman of the Year Laverne Cox!”

That’s how lesbian actress Jodie Foster introduced transgender actress/activist (Charles) Laverne Cox at the Glamour magazine event. In the magazine, the article on Cox was titled “The Advocate.”  

November 21, 2014, 3:18 PM EST

Former CBS reporter Sharyl Attkisson told Glenn Beck about the latest document release forced by Judicial Watch, which demonstrates Obama's Department of Justice was working to squash Attkisson's reporting on the Obama administration.

Attkisson read from one of the documents, an October 4, 2011 e-mail from Tracy Schmaler, the top press aide for Attorney General Eric Holder, to White House Deputy Press Secretary Eric Schultz.

November 21, 2014, 10:57 AM EST

The Washington Post divided its Obama-speech coverage into three parts on Friday's front page: the speech, "the immigrants," and "the opposition," because it's always fun to pitch Republicans as opposing immigrants. The headline was "The Opposition: Republicans confront own worst enemy." That would be the conservatives.

Post reporter Robert Costa warned of an "immediate and widening rebellion among tea party lawmakers that top Republicans are struggling to contain." Inside the A section, Obama's speech was headlined. "Obama promotes a 'common-sense' approach." The article on the opposition was headlined "GOP to face internal bickering."

November 20, 2014, 1:52 PM EST

Some of the nation's most influential newspapers sympathetically broke out the euphemisms for Obama as he prepares for unilateral executive action to "shield" some illegal immigrants from the rule of law, which they call "deportation relief." He's "cheered by reform advocates."

November 20, 2014, 7:42 AM EST

The new “Fusion” network, created by ABC and Univision, tried to brand itself as pro-protester by hosting an all-day protester summit in Washington on Wednesday. David Montgomery of The Washington Post sympathetically reported the program included “members of Pussy Riot, the Russian punk-feminist band, as well as organizers of demonstrations in Ferguson, Mo., and a leader of the Million Hoodies Movement for Justice.” Unsurprisingly, there were no Tea Party or pro-life protesters mentioned.

Fusion anchor Jorge Ramos strangely interviewed Obama’s U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power – strange because he had to know she would be, in turn, protested.

November 19, 2014, 7:43 AM EST

Washington Post “social change reporter” Sandhya Somashekhar wrote a front-page story for Wednesday’s editions on how the Barilla pasta company completely surrendered to the gay left. The headline was “A recipe for recovery: Barilla makes amends to gay groups.”

As usual, the Post divided the conflict into “gay rights groups” and “social conservatives.” Gay activist Bob Witeck described the conservative view as “stupid and backwards.” Conservatives said...nothing. There was no space for rebuttal. “Social change” moves faster when “backwards” gets censored.

November 18, 2014, 10:49 PM EST

After the 2012 campaign, liberal journalists swarmed around Republican Party chair Reince Priebus offering what was called an “autopsy” on every way Republicans failed, with a special emphasis on more outreach to minority voters. Democrats and their media enablers painted a picture of demographic doom for an aging white Republican base.

Two years later, Republicans made dramatic gains among minority voters. In House races across America, Republicans won 50 percent of the Asian vote to 49 percent for Democrats. Republicans won 38 percent of the Hispanic vote in House races. Gov. Sam Brownback drew 47 percent of Hispanics in Kansas, and Gov-elect Greg Abbott pulled in 44 percent of Hispanics in Texas.

November 18, 2014, 12:02 PM EST

NPR and PBS have finally touched the Gruber brouhaha, but neither showed any enthusiasm for it. On Sunday morning’s Weekend Edition, anchor Rachel Martin and reporter Mara Liasson dismissed it in 59 seconds. 

On the PBS NewsHour Monday, anchor Judy Woodruff brought in two liberal journalists to discuss Gruber, but first Woodruff asked six questions about how open enrollment was going. 

November 18, 2014, 7:56 AM EST

NPR political analyst Cokie Roberts appears on Morning Edition on Mondays, and she put on her advocacy hat this week. Alarmed at Republican gains among minority voters as the Democrats were "shlonked" at the polls,  Roberts insisted "The Democrats have got to do something fast on immigration to get back those votes because they're never going to get the white vote."

Latino pollster and advocate Matt Barreto said minority voters are looking for "relief" from deportations: "I think there's a huge opportunity here for the president."

November 16, 2014, 11:01 PM EST

Politico wrote a headline about the “liberal media.” Politico wasn't writing about themselves, or the broadcast networks, or the top national newspapers. Maggie Haberman and Hadas Gold defined "liberal media" as hard-left opinion magazines: Harper's, The Nation, and In These Times.

November 16, 2014, 8:18 AM EST

Pseudo-conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks -- appointed by both NPR and PBS to agree with liberals from the "Republican" side of the political divide on Friday-night "week in review" panels -- is back to bashing Ted Cruz, even though after the election, he admitted Republicans weren't too extreme to win all over the place.

Brooks was bashing Obama with the worst cudgel he could imagine: Mr. President, don't pull a "total Ted Cruz manuever" and force amnesty by executive order. He said the same thing on PBS.

November 15, 2014, 11:28 PM EST

The Washington Post reserved its top left spot on the front page Saturday to highlight the Washington National Cathedral, run by leftist Episcopalians, host a “first Muslim service, a plea for harmony.” Under a big color photo, the Post explained the service had a sermon from a Muslim scholar who is South Africa’s ambassador to the United States, “urging unity in the fight against extremists who appropriate Islam.”

The story came on the front of the Metro section with the headline “Unity call at cathedral’s first Muslim service.” But inside on B-2, in between two more large color photos, came the headline “During cathedral’s first prayer service for Muslims, a moment of hate intrudes.”

November 15, 2014, 6:31 PM EST

Here’s an easy nomination for the front-page newspaper story most likely to be spiked by the TV networks. It’s on the front of Friday’s USA Today: “Rural hospitals in critical condition: Obamacare critics say law speeding up demise of facilities.”

Reporters Jayne O’Donnell and Laura Ungar began in Richland, Georgia, whose 25-bed hospital had to close, and now the locals have to travel up to 40 miles to other hospitals. How many sympathetic TV stories have we seen complaining about the closure of abortion clinics that cause abotion seekers to drive longer?

November 15, 2014, 5:16 PM EST

The New York Times reported a scandal when a collection of Nazi memorabilia caused a senior Human Rights Watch analyst to be suspended in 2009. But collecting Red China Mao Zedong memorabilia is apparently much more charming.

On Friday, Times culture reporter William “Biff” Grimes promoted “Quotations of Chairman Mao: 50th Anniversary Exhibition, 1964-2014,” at the Grolier Club, displaying “books and propaganda material from the collection of Justin G. Schiller, an antiquarian book seller.”