Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham
January 25, 2012, 2:27 PM EST

Although the media would love to present Barack Obama as seven times brainier than George W. Bush, Byron Tau of Politico reports "President Obama's 2012 State of the Union address again rated at an 8th grade comprehension level on the Flesch-Kincaid readability test — the third lowest score of any State of the Union address since 1934."

Eric Ostermeier of the University of Minnesota's Smart Politics initiative conducted an analysis on the last 70 State of the Union addresses and found that President Obama's three addresses have the lowest grade average of any modern president. (Obama came in 13th out of 13; George W. Bush was at number eight.)

January 25, 2012, 7:28 AM EST

Time political reporter Michael Scherer is really impressed with the looks of NBC anchor Brian Williams -- or he'd like to work for NBC Nightly News. In his minute-by-minute summary of the Monday night Republican debate, titled "What You Missed While Not Watching the NBC GOP Debate in Florida," what Scherer thought was most striking was the handsomeness of Williams.

The first time, he wrote, "Brian Williams, the handsomest man to have never been a movie star, is not wasting any time." On and on it went, as Williams was dapper and debonair and detective-like:

January 24, 2012, 8:23 AM EST

Any liberal with two eyes can see that tens of thousands of activists turn out every year in Washington for the March for Life. By contrast, abortion advocates have a turnout on the Supreme Court steps that couldn’t fill a classroom. In their only story on Tuesday (on the bottom of the Metro section front page), the Post once again treated these two groups as equally newsworthy -- except one side was indoctrinating its youth in "antiabortion ideology."

I saw a cluster of about eight or ten “feminist majority” signs yesterday that could have been easily missed. But the Post centered its online photo montage on the feminists and pro-lifers yelling at the feminists.

January 24, 2012, 6:33 AM EST

On Sunday, Washington Post ombudsman Patrick Pexton noted that Deborah Howell, Post ombudsman from 2005 through 2008, said at the end of her tenure that “some of the conservatives’ complaints about a liberal tilt [at The Post] are valid.” He added: “I won’t quibble with her conclusion. I think she was right.”

Pexton said this even as he characterized his electronic mailbox as a harsh place when conservatives get going on the paper’s fawning Obama coverage:

January 23, 2012, 8:43 AM EST

Longtime Washington Post reporter David Maraniss, author of several books on Bill Clinton, took to the Post op-ed page on Monday to plead for his subject. With Newt Gingrich on the rise, "Democrats have only one illogically rational response in this modern American political hall of mirrors. They should bring back Bill Clinton."

"Of course, the law prohibits the Comeback Kid from coming back to serve a third term, and Obama might not go for it, but only old-school twits would let any of that get in the way," wrote Maraniss. "The Constitution and its amendments are so 18th, 19th and 20th century. The notion of persuading good ol’ Joe Biden to step aside in favor of Hillary as vice president is not sufficiently grandiose when it comes to going after Gingrich."

January 23, 2012, 8:07 AM EST

One of the hoariest tactics of liberal media personalities is to single out strongly pro-life candidates and ask them if they’d let their daughters get an abortion, even in a case of rape. Piers Morgan dragged out this line of questioning on Rick Santorum on Friday night, adding that in this far-fetched hypothetical, the daughter would be “begging you to let her have an abortion.”

Piers may have borrowed from his CNN predecessor Larry King's playbook, since Larry threw a version of this at Dan Quayle in 1992. This is not a tactic they’ve tried on Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama. Can you imagine a liberal interviewer asking if they would accompany their daughter to the clinic? Or what they would do if the daughter regretted their abortion? No, only the pro-lifers get this hardball. (Video below).

January 23, 2012, 6:59 AM EST

On Friday night’s PBS NewsHour, pseudo-conservative analyst David Brooks insisted Obama’s new campaign ad is bogus and un-factual, but since that sounded too anti-Obama, he added that "if the Republican Party is going to look backwards, at least he can try to look forwards. And that's probably a good, decent strategy.”

Brooks felt no such need to balance when Mark Shields suggested Gingrich (politically) was a “great first date,” and Brooks mocked Gingrich’s multiple wives:

January 22, 2012, 10:31 PM EST

Over at Think Progress, liberal culture blogger Alyssa Rosenberg loves the new Bruce Springsteen single titled “We Take Care Of Our Own”: “The Boss is in full rallying cry mode...This seems practically designed to be played at Obama-Biden rallies (if not the Democratic National Convention itself). The choice of Chicago as the origin point for that sense of mutual care seems pretty deliberate.”

So it’s funny to see music writer Randall Roberts in the Los Angeles Times slamming the Boss for “jingoism” and overtones from the movie “Deliverance," perhaps because the lyrics refer to a flag being flown:    

January 22, 2012, 2:59 PM EST

Via MRC's Dan Gainor, there's this captured Saturday morning headline on an Alex Burns piece from Politico: "Mitt vs. the walking dead." That certainly looks silly now. In fact, it was quickly changed on Saturday morning.

The headline writer may have been borrowing from the leftists at the Guardian newspaper in Britain, who came out of the New Hampshire results with a "Mitt vs. the Zombies" spin:

January 22, 2012, 8:56 AM EST

In Saturday’s Washington Post, longtime Newsweek religion editor Lisa Miller predicted pro-lifers would be disgusting on Monday: “Anti-abortion activists are preparing for Monday’s Right to Life rally and are planning to launch a graphic abortion video that makes the old, pro-choice coat-hanger signs look like Disney movies.” As usual, abortion advocates find videos of abortion distasteful, while abortion as a concept is a glorious exercise in freedom of choice.

Miller lectured “Politicians may not be able to hold two contradictory ideas in their head at the same time, but people can.” She moved on to mangle the polls on abortion to paint a picture of a large pro-abortion majority:

January 22, 2012, 8:40 AM EST

MRC-TV captured video of a Stephen Colbert event in South Carolina where he sang "This Little Light of Mine"  with a gospel choir. Which message does this send? Does this send a Christian message? Or is it much more likely that Colbert is using this Christian song as a typical rock for his character's bottomless pit of self-regard? Perhaps he's just being an entertainer.

The video also features a nice version of the national anthem, although Colbert gets a little goofy with a bass line near the end. Are you charmed or annoyed? Video below:

January 21, 2012, 7:45 PM EST

It's not often that Newt Gingrich looks like a winner in The Washington Post. But on Saturday, Post media reporter Paul Farhi lined up a set of liberal media veterans and journalism professors to attack CNN reporter John King for walking into a Gingrich buzzsaw by opening the debate with his second wife's "open marriage" assertion at Thursday night's CNN debate.

“Gingrich was clearly waiting for the question, clearly was prepared to pounce,” said W. Joseph Campbell, a communications professor and media historian at American University. “King seemed taken off guard. He looked a little sickened. And he did himself no favors by lamely pointing out that it wasn’t CNN but another network that dug out the Gingrich-infidelity story. That allowed Gingrich to pounce again.”

January 21, 2012, 2:25 PM EST

Other than the snide dismissal of conservative NPR critics, David Margolick's Vanity Fair story on NPR really captured how much Juan Williams was despised by his NPR colleagues – and NPR listeners. Simply to anticipate such listener outrage, he wrote, one NPR editor created a kind of “Juan Williams Watch,” tuning in Fox regularly to hear, as she put it, whatever “stupid cockamamie” thing he might say, and which, therefore, she would have to defend.

“The thing nobody will say...is that Juan was here because he was black,” complained one, as the story painted a picture of Williams as a shiftless bum who coasted on his race and didn’t care to educate himself about the issues. Other blacks were catty. “Juan, gettin’ ugly,” e-mailed Farai Chideya. "Three times in our hour-long interview," Margolick noted, talk-show host Michel Martin called Williams “the most skillful manipulator of white people’s anxieties that I have ever met.”

 

January 21, 2012, 8:32 AM EST

Last April, when the story was still hot that National Public Radio had deeply embarrassed itself when two of its fundraisers were caught on tape pandering to two men they thought were radical Muslim leftists eager to donate, David Margolick of the liberal glossy Vanity Fair called and interviewed me for more than an hour about NPR. Now, at this late date, the NPR-defending article appeared. I wasn’t in it. But conservatives were mocked – they couldn’t possibly believe what they were saying about liberal bias.

“Apart from the occasional stories about gays or Palestinians (and maybe even gay Palestinians), there’s precious little on NPR these days for conservatives really to hate,” he claimed. “For them, despising NPR and cutting off what amounts to the few pennies it collects from the federal budget has increasingly become more a matter of pandering, or habit, or sophomoric sport, than of conviction or serious policy.” His proof was bias-denying journalist William Kristol:

 

January 20, 2012, 11:25 PM EST

The media is going to work overtime to ignore Mark Levin’s brand-new book “Ameritopia.” He asks: Do we choose between America as it was founded on liberty or a radically socialist Ameritopia? Levin says we’ve already chosen (b). No one in the liberal media wants that announced so explicitly from their mountain tops.

The arrogance of socialists is apparent on the back cover of Levin’s book. It carries a passage from Adam Smith that aptly defines the modern leftist: “He seems to imagine that he can arrange the different members of a great society with as much ease as the hand arranges the different pieces upon a chess-board.” That perfectly defines utopians like Thomas Friedman of The New York Times, who has explicitly declared his affinity for tyranny. “I think we’re entering an era...where being in politics is going to be more than anything else about taking things away from people.”

January 20, 2012, 4:47 PM EST

On January 21, 1998, the very day the Monica Lewinsky affair broke, Newsweek's Eleanor Clift disdained the story as old news and insisted that presidents like JFK and LBJ demonstrated that "libido and leadership is often linked."

But on Wednesday's Thom Hartmann show, Clift found nothing distasteful in ABC's Marianne Gingrich interview to investigate Newt Gingrich's affinity for "open marriage." She guessed wrong that Gingrich would "just ignore it."

January 20, 2012, 11:05 AM EST

Dan Rather's career keeps looking sillier. Mark Cuban's HDNet has a splashy new partner -- Ryan Seacrest, the host of "American Idol" and producers of such highbrow TV as "Keeping Up with the Kardashians." The network will rebrand itself as AXS (pronounced "access") and go heavy on concerts.

Cuban said "Dan Rather Reports" will remain as is. The new moniker may fit Rather, who certain has "axes" to grind against conservatives. Here's how Lisa de Moraes of the Washington Post put it:

January 20, 2012, 8:09 AM EST

CNN's John King explained after the final South Carolina debate that he started by asking Newt about his "open marriage" because it seemed like the "elephant in the room." Former Bush aide Ari Fleischer dissented and said the economy is always the number one story, not just the political insider's hot story. So let's ask: when CNN hosted a Democratic debate in South Carolina on January 21, 2008, did they lead with a hot scandal or a personal peccadillo? Nope. They started with the economy.

It was the tenth anniversary of the Monica Lewinsky story breaking, and the debate stood out when Hillary slashed Obama on his relationship with shady financier Tony Rezko. But Monica and Clinton's impeachment never came up. CNN's Joe Johns led off by asking Hillary Clinton about just how generous her "stimulus" would be:

January 20, 2012, 6:46 AM EST

Conservatives remember how everything from flammable pajamas to sexual harassment in public housing was blamed on Ronald Reagan. On NPR's All Things Considered on Wednesday night, somehow the wreck of the Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia became "reminiscent of" former conservative prime minister Silvio Berlusconi.

Longtime NPR reporter Sylvia Poggioli described how the ship's captain, Francesco Schettino, was chewed out by Italy's new hero, Coast Guard captain Gregorio De Falco, who said some Italian version of "Go back onboard, dammit" to the captain who abandoned ship instead of overseeing the evacuation of passengers. This reminded NPR of the incompetence and greed of Berlusconi's rule:

January 19, 2012, 11:09 PM EST

On Thursday, the Washington Post website posted an article at about 1 pm from reporter James Grimaldi based on a Post interview with Newt Gingrich’s second wife Marianne making claims that Gingrich asked for an “open marriage.” The standard was wham, bam, print it, ma'am.

The Post had a very different standard for Bill Clinton. Paula Jones held a press conference at CPAC on February 11, 1994. Three days later, Jones came up only briefly about 25 paragraphs into the piece with Post reporter Lloyd Grove lamenting, “David Keene seemed delighted to let his confab be turned into a staging area for yet another ascension of Mount Bimbo.” Investigative reporter Michael Isikoff later was suspended for two weeks after the Post delayed and delayed on Jones: