Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham
October 23, 2010, 6:03 PM EDT

Despite CNN committing five segments to helping the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) celebrate the new "Spirit Day" against anti-gay bullying, GLAAD somehow left CNN out of their list of participating TV "news" outlets.

On her Facebook page, Canadian teen Brittany McMillan started the new day of obli-gay-tion, and wrote: "Many of [the teens] suffered from homophobic abuse in their schools or in their homes. We want to take a stand to say that we will not tolerate this. Purple represents Spirit on the LGBTQ flag and that's exactly what we'd like all of you to have with you: spirit." On the GLAAD Blog, intern Max Gouttebroze listed all the media activism for "tolerance" and against "homophobia."

October 23, 2010, 8:26 AM EDT

Alissa Krinsky of the TV Newser blog talked to NBC anchor Brian Williams in Chicago Friday on his way to a Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation fundraiser. Williams refused to join the crowd of liberal reporters and celebrities who've called it a mistake. He even refused to condemn the firing for giving Williams to chance to explain himself.

October 22, 2010, 11:33 PM EDT

New York Times reporter Kate Zernike appeared on Washington Week on PBS to discuss the Tea Party, but with less than two weeks to go before a wave election, Zernike has already spotted "the jump-the-shark moment" for the Tea Party in Christine O'Donnell. Does she know what means, as in when a TV show reaches its zenith and from then on, it's all downhill? It doesn't sound like November 2 is going to be an all-downhill evening. PBS host Gwen Ifill asked Zernike the usual question about whether the Tea Party would help Republicans:  

ZERNIKE: There's two things in this election. One thing is the Tea Party enthusiasm, which has been huge. I mean, remember, no one thought Christine O'Donnell could ever win that primary.

IFILL: That's true.

October 22, 2010, 8:31 PM EDT

At the end of Friday night's PBS NewsHour, anchor Judy Woodruff asked their political analysts Mark Shields and David Brooks about NPR's firing of Juan Williams. Shields said "NPR made a serious mistake...and I think they did it in a terrible way, by a telephone call without a personal chance to explain himself. You know, I think it's given the right wing a tremendous opening to attack NPR, which I hate to see happen, because I think it's a valuable public institution."

Brooks disclosed "I work at NPR somewhat" (as part of a similary analyst duo with liberal Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne). Brooks agreed with Mark about the firing and its lack of personal contact. "I think what was said is perfectly within the bounds of debate." But then he insisted NPR has achieved sensible centrism in recent history:

And the damaging thing to me is NPR's worked really hard over the last 10, 20 years to become a straight-down-the-middle network. I'm not sure they were decades ago, but not they really are. And now because of this unfortunate episode, they're beginning to get some ideological baggage again, and that's damaging.

October 22, 2010, 6:37 PM EDT

The Washington Post is apparently an easy mark for someone selling 19-year-old sex allegations – or in this case pornography allegations against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. In 1991, during the Hill-Thomas hearings, Lillian McEwen kept quiet. But now, she has a memoir she's "shopping to publishers." The Post splashed her face across the front of Friday's Style section. The headline was “I have nothing to be afraid of,” leaving out “and a book deal to gain.” The subhead was “Nineteen years after his turbulent confirmation, Lillian McEwen opens up with telling details about her intimate relationship with Clarence Thomas.” But are the “telling details” true or false?

Reporter Michael Fletcher (co-author of a critical biography of Justice Thomas) downplays that McEwen was a Democrat and lawyer for Senator Joe Biden on the Judiciary Committee. In their 1994 anti-Thomas book Strange Justice, reporters Jill Abramson and Jane Mayer quote Sukari Hardnett (another Thomas accuser) claiming Thomas discussed his personal life with her, complaining that McEwen viewed him as “a puppet of the Republicans.” 

October 22, 2010, 8:07 AM EDT

Fired NPR analyst Juan Williams is pushing back hard against the taxpayer-funded network firing him over his appearances on the Fox News Channel. In an opinion piece for Foxnews.com, Williams says he was a victim of political correctness and increasing ideological orthodoxy in media, and concluded that NPR is worse than Richard Nixon and his enemies list:

I say an ideological battle because my comments on "The O’Reilly Factor" are being distorted by the self-righteous ideological, left-wing leadership at NPR. They are taking bits and pieces of what I said to go after me for daring to have a conversation with leading conservative thinkers. They loathe the fact that I appear on Fox News. They don’t notice that I am challenging Bill O’Reilly and trading ideas with Sean Hannity. In their hubris they think by talking with O’Reilly or Hannity I am lending them legitimacy. Believe me, Bill O’Reilly (and Sean, too) is a major force in American culture and politics whether or not I appear on his show.

Years ago NPR tried to stop me from going on "The Factor." When I refused they insisted that I not identify myself as an NPR journalist. I asked them if they thought people did not know where I appeared on the air as a daily talk show host, national correspondent and news analyst. They refused to budge.

October 22, 2010, 7:36 AM EDT

Penthouse magazine founder and pornographer Bob Guccione has died, but The Washington Post seems to think "pornography" is too ugly a word to apply to a  man who aimed to be explicitly sordid. From the beginning, as T. Rees Shapiro wrote, he aspired to offend:

Penthouse's first issue was numbered, not dated, because Mr. Guccione, an American expatriate, was not sure how the British public would receive his magazine. But to ensure success, he sent graphic promotional materials to the clergy and every member of parliament.

The ensuing uproar landed Mr. Guccione on the front page of every English newspaper, and Penthouse's first printing sold out in two days.

From those controversial roots, Mr. Guccione, who died of lung cancer Oct. 20 at age 79 at a hospital in Plano, Tex., built a worldwide erotic empire.  

October 21, 2010, 8:46 AM EDT

It shouldn't be shocking that as many NPR stations are conducting pledge drives of their liberal audiences, NPR has found a pretext to fire its longtime analyst Juan Williams for an appearance on Fox News. NPR listeners have complained loud and long that NPR analysts should not dignify that right-wing media outlet with their presence. Williams admitted on The O'Reilly Factor "when I get on the plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they are identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous." 

It should be noted that the Council for American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) sent around a press release on Wednesday afternoon. CAIR National Executive Director Nihad Awad called for action against Williams: "Such irresponsible and inflammatory comments would not be tolerated if they targeted any other racial, ethnic or religious minority, and they should not pass without action by NPR." The New York Times somehow omitted CAIR from its Juan-is-gone story.

October 20, 2010, 9:34 PM EDT

The pile of liberal guests (and guest hosts) on ABC's The View Tuesday led to breathless admiration and excitement all around. Washington Post TV writer Lisa de Moraes noticed that guest host Maria Shriver cooed to comedian Stephen Colbert about the liberal Rally to Restore Sanity And/Or Fear on October 30: "My daughter [Christina Schwarzenegger] goes to Georgetown and she's so excited to come to the rally. What should she expect?"

This must thrill liberal hearts, who want something (anything) that fires up liberal young people.

Barbara Walters was feeling warm and fuzzy introducing her good friend Arianna Huffington: "Full disclosure. This is a day when I have two -- with Maria and Arianna, when I have two women I have known forever. We have known each other for 30 years. [Referring to Huffington, and clutching her hand,] I am the godmother to her eldest child. So I'm slightly prejudiced." She waved around the cover of the new Forbes magazine Power Women issue, with Huffington on the cover.

Colbert, that "potent evangelist" for Catholics, was asked about teaching "Sunday school" (which isn't really Catholic terminology), and he joked about teaching about a "loosey-goosey Jesus."

October 20, 2010, 2:37 PM EDT

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow offered this jaw-dropping sentence on Tuesday night: “We love to have conservatives on this show. We really, really, really do. Last night, Meghan McCain was nice enough to come by. And incredibly, nobody was injured or even angered.”

Maddow must be joking. Meghan McCain, who was rushed on to ABC on Sunday for writing, among other things, “Rather than leading us into the exhilarating fresh air of liberty, a chorus of voices on the radical right is taking us to a place of intolerance and anger.”

There was no anger on the MSNBC set because Maddow and Ms. McCain agree on nearly everything, as viewers could see in two segments last 12 and a half minutes. If Maddow truly loved having conservatives on, she would have let someone debate young McCain. She constantly plays the victim of vicious conservatives.

October 20, 2010, 8:36 AM EDT

On Monday's Joy Behar show, the host promoted the latest work of liberal actor Richard Dreyfuss, but soon turned the conversation to Dreyfuss playing Dick Cheney in the 2008 Oliver Stone flop "W." and how he could find the "satanic spot" in his soul to play Cheney. Dreyfuss said you can "find all the villainy in the world in your own heart," and said he tells students to focus on the Hitler inside you when playing a bad guy. Cheney as Hitler: this is just another night on the Joy Behar Show.

BEHAR: Now, you played a bad guy in "Red" and you also played a bad guy in "W," one of my favorite movies. So funny. 

DREYFUSS: Which you said I would never do. He would never do that. He would never play Dick Cheney. He's a liberal.

BEHAR: I was wrong. I was wrong. But was it hard to play Dick Cheney?

October 19, 2010, 5:32 PM EDT

A letter to the editor of The Washington Times really underscored how little attention the D.C. media are paying to Congressman Jim Moran, who represents the easternmost part of northern Virginia (including MRC headquarters in Alexandria). A letter writer complained:

October 19, 2010, 7:26 AM EDT

After layoffs cost him his job as a media reporter for socialist editor and author Greg Mitchell at Editor & Publisher magazine, Joe Strupp landed at Media Matters for America, where he can ask the liberal media elite why on Earth any of them would ever appear on that unethical Republican swamp known as Fox News (or Fox affiliates on Sundays).

In this case, Strupp went looking for former New York Times reporters and editors to denounce current Times reporter Elisabeth Bumiller (the one who suggested to President Bush he should feel personally responsible for the 9/11 attacks) for sinking to an appearance on Fox News Sunday. Former Times media reporter Alex Jones even suggested Fox gets zero credit for open-mindedness for allowing a liberal Times reporter on their set:

"It is a bad idea, period," said Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center on Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University. "I think the format is calculated to make you say things you would like to put back in your mouth."

...He said Times reporters appearing on any cable talk show is a mistake, but singled out Fox, stating, "Fox is an organ of the Republican party. I think everyone who goes on there shares in being used by them for their entertainment value. Fox uses them to demonstrate they are open-minded by putting the Times on there. But does it show Fox is open-minded? I don't think so."

October 18, 2010, 4:59 PM EDT

With the Democrats losing so badly in the polls, the bloggers of the Daily Kos are coming more unglued than usual. The diarist going by the name "Troubadour" predicted on Monday "This Could Get Ugly." In other words, the GOP are going to start killing liberals:

The difficult thing about dealing with a frenzied totalitarian movement like today's Republican Party is not only do they not take "No" for an answer, they don't even really take "Yes."  Whether they're sent packing by the electorate or accepted with open arms, their one and only response to all possible events is to further crystallize their beliefs, purify their ranks of dissent, and break all of their own records for violence, depravity, and madness.  So we find ourselves confronting a bitter realization: Win or lose this election season, Republicans appear to be headed on a one-way path to organized political violence.

This would seem to take a page directly from liberal historian Richard Hofstadter's essay The Paranoid Style in American Politics. It might seem counterintuitive to get violent after winning, but this Kosmonaut imagines (wildly) that the right-wing hate-radio subculture will grow more vicious with every election-night victory...into moderate-Republican assassinations:

October 18, 2010, 3:29 PM EDT

CNN, like many liberal media outlets, is very interested in diversity -- in race, creed, sexual preference, everything but ideology.  But check out this image today, as CNN launched a new marketing gimmick asking viewers to fill in the sentence "My America Is...." If we're going to get into bean-counting here, judging from the graphic behind anchorman Tony Harris today, America is majority-black and has a lot of Muslim women.

October 18, 2010, 11:09 AM EDT

The Washington Post is now farming out its liberal hit pieces to outside journalism groups. On the top of page A3 Monday was a story from the liberal Center for Public Integrity slashing Republicans (and conservative Democrats) as hypocrites for voting against the so-called “stimulus” but then sending constituent requests for “stimulus” support. This, by now, is a very tired White House talking point from February, but reporters John Solomon and Aaron Mehta were retreading it anyway:

Rep. Pete Sessions, the firebrand conservative from Texas, has relentlessly assailed the Democratic stimulus efforts as a package of wasteful "trillion-dollar spending sprees" that was "more about stimulating the government and rewarding political allies than growing the economy and creating jobs."

But that didn't stop the Republican lawmaker from seeking stimulus money behind the scenes for the Dallas suburb of Carrollton after the GOP campaign against the 2009 stimulus law quieted down....

October 18, 2010, 7:51 AM EDT

The Style section of Monday's Washington Post has an enormous picture of Jimmy Carter with the simple headline "The Book of Jimmy." The Post is jarringly behind Carter's publicity curve for his latest book White House Diary, but reporter Manuel Roig-Franzia began with the usual goo from Carter's church in Plains, Georgia: "On those scattered weekends when Jimmy Carter isn't out enforcing Middle East harmony or slaying Guinea worms or compensating for presidential malaise with ex-presidential vim, the 86-year-old can be found in Sunday school."

Anyone who's paid attention to Carter would know that "enforcing Middle East harmony" is not the right description for someone who compares Israel to apartheid-era South Africa.

Readers who don't want a cavity from all that sugar might move on to the next story, but Roig-Franzia arrived at a sharper point in paragraph nine, after Carter has declared that America is the nation most committed to waging war in the entire world, and that the Iraq invasion was "horribly unnecessary" -- the reporter read Carter's book and finds that he's a preachy know-it-all: 

October 17, 2010, 11:09 PM EDT

Wednesday's Washington Post carried a Style section article on "when to dump your date," or the "deal breakers" then men and women have. Post reporter Lois Romano used her daughters Jenna and Kristen Holmes. One checks out a guy's bookshelf to see if he's a reader or just has old high school textbooks taking up space. "Guys are getting stupider and stupider," she said.  

October 17, 2010, 8:09 AM EDT

Perhaps the people at National Public Radio are worried that a new Republican Congress could threaten the lavishness of its federal subsidies again. Or maybe NPR is just a sandbox for the Left. But on Wednesday, the show Fresh Air spent most of its hour suggesting the Republican Party was dangerously infested with extremists. The guest was socialist Princeton professor Sean Wilentz, who has written that George W. Bush practiced "a radicalized version of Reaganism."  Host Terry Gross was promoting Wilentz's article in The New Yorker on Glenn Beck and the Tea Party:

GROSS: Can you think of another time in American history when there have been as many people running for Congress who seem to be on the extreme?

WILENTZ: Not running for Congress, no. I mean even back in the '50s.

This is par for the course, since Gross promoted a New Yorker piece by Jane Mayer just a few weeks ago (on August 26) on how the Koch brothers were funding the Tea Party as part of a "war" on that secular saint, President Obama. What stuck out in this interview was the use of "extreme" labels for the conservative movement and the GOP --  twelve of them. In Sesame Street lingo, the hour was brought to you by the letter E for Extreme. Most of them came in Gross's restate-the-thesis (or in this case, restate-the-attack-ad) "if you're just joining us" reintroductions.

October 16, 2010, 2:19 PM EDT

Liberal comedian Stephen Colbert's joke-testimony to Congress may have been a low moment for the House of Representatives, but apparently, to reporters, it makes him a symbol of holiness. Kimberly Winston of the Religion News Service hailed Colbert in an article that appeared in Saturday's Washington Post.

"And, you know, whatsoever you do for the least of my brothers, and these seem like the least of our brothers right now," Colbert said, quoting Jesus. "Migrant workers suffer and have no rights."

It was a different kind of religious message than Colbert typically delivers on Comedy Central's "The Colbert Report," where he often pokes fun at religion - even his own Catholic Church - in pursuit of a laugh. Yet it was the kind of serious faith that some of his fellow Catholics say makes him a serious, covert and potent evangelist for their faith.

"Anytime you talk about Jesus or Christianity respectfully the way he does, it is evangelization," said the Rev. Jim Martin, associate editor of the Jesuit magazine America, who has appeared on Colbert's show four times. "He is preaching the gospel, but I think he is doing it in a very postmodern way."