Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham
September 7, 2014, 9:29 AM EDT

Jason Howerton at The Blaze passed along this nugget from the CBS New York website: sports radio host Craig Carton, whose show with Boomer Esiason airs on the CBS Sports Network on cable, laid into the NFL following Peter King’s report that the NFL lobbied teams to pick up openly gay defensive tackle Michael Sam after he was released by the St. Louis Rams. They couldn't stand the "nightmare scenario" of Sam not making a team.

Carton called out the league over the plea that Sam and others pushed that he should be given a chance on the football merits, not some sort of gay affirmative action program:

September 7, 2014, 7:43 AM EDT

Soon-to-be CNN host Mike Rowe – the former star of “Dirty Jobs” on the Discovery Channel – took to his Facebook page to express amusement that a 2006 photo promoting “Shark Week” was used by an NPR station in Kansas City to bash “Shark Week” as....jumping the shark.

Rowe wrote that the photo reminded him of being extremely scared (“pint of urine” scared) because it was taken “approximately five seconds before the shark behind me attempted to bite my mask off.”

September 6, 2014, 4:21 PM EDT

The Huffington Post laid it on thick when the electric-car company Tesla picked Nevada instead of Texas for a new plant. The headline was “Rick Perry Lost Big With Tesla Deal.”

Huff-Post reporter Alexander C. Kaufman began by underlining just what a “loss” this was to the outgoing governor and potential presidential contender.

September 6, 2014, 8:22 AM EDT

Five years ago, Pope Benedict arrived in London to erupting controversy. Around 10,000 people took to the capital's streets for a rally against the Holy Father's “intolerance,” and as the Guardian reported, against “the child abuse scandal for which so many hold the pontiff personally responsible, for both accelerating it and then covering it up.”

The abuse in question centered for the most part on incidents that were 40 years old or more. So where are the media on the child sex abuse scandal in Rotherham, England?

September 6, 2014, 6:33 AM EDT

The Hollywood Reporter announced that Jon Stewart’s new film “Rosewater” debuted at the Telluride Film Festival in Colorado. Their headline was “'Rosewater' Director Jon Stewart Receives Hero's Welcome.”

Apparently, Stewart is a hero when he shows up at film festivals where liberals cluster. Or he’s a hero for regularly banging away at Fox News on “The Daily Show.” Or he’s a hero for having a sense of nuance about the “greatly differing worldviews” in Iran. Writer Scott Feinberg does proclaim he’s a “fan of @BarackObama” on his Twitter bio.

September 5, 2014, 8:29 AM EDT

On The Kelly File on Thursday night, Megyn Kelly showed what she called “frighteningly accurate” video of President George W. Bush in 2007 explaining why we shouldn’t pull out of Iraq prematurely.

Kelly was interviewing former Bush speechwriter Marc Thiessen.

September 4, 2014, 10:13 PM EDT

Regular NewsBusters readers are in for a bit of a shock. This is the blog's first major redesign since 2008. We hope you enjoy a more modern format with larger videos and more space and less clutter. It should also be more responsive to your mobile devices, since so many readers now catch us on the go.

September 4, 2014, 12:27 PM EDT

Fox News correspondent James Rosen has been investigated by Obama's Justice Department for being a "co-conspirator" and violator of the Espoinage Act. Attorney general Eric Holder even approved seizing Rosen's private e-mails. Now, Rosen's latest question at a State Department briefing to press aide Jen Psaki prompted her assisant Marie Harf to tweet that Psaki "explains foreign policy w/ intelligence & class. Too bad we can't say the same about @oreilly factor."

Rosen told Bill O'Reilly that "After a little more back and forth, Jen Psaki told me, she sees no utility in placing new labels on the terms of engagement for the United States. If you translate that from diplo- speak, it means no.
This administration does not regard the murders of Mr. Foley and Sotloff as acts of war or more to the point this administration is not placing United States on a war footing with respect to ISIS." O'Reilly said Psaki "looks way out of her depth over there." [See video below.] 

September 3, 2014, 10:40 PM EDT

DNC chair Debbie Wasserman-Schultz ramped up “War on Women” rhetoric to an accusatory new level. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports the Florida congresswoman said the Governor of Wisconsin is a domestic abuser: "Scott Walker has given women the back of his hand. I know that is stark. I know that is direct. But that is reality."

Wasserman Schultz added: "What Republican tea party extremists like Scott Walker are doing is they are grabbing us by the hair and pulling us back. It is not going to happen on our watch." The Democratic candidate for governor there, Mary Burke, was backtracking:

September 3, 2014, 2:14 PM EDT

I’ve been accused of anti-Semitism twice, and I still bristle.

The first was after the Buchanan presidential run of ’92, which I supported, and which triggered an ugly whisper campaign in Hollywood suggesting an anti-Semitic streak lurking under the hood. The second time, ten years ago, was frontal. I had conducted a tele-conference, involving a dozen or more journalists, to unveil the results of a study conducted by the Parents Television Council involving Hollywood and religion. I learned about an hour later that Lynn Smith of the L.A. Times was working up a story suggesting I’d made anti-Semitic remarks.

September 3, 2014, 12:35 PM EDT

The lobbying group “Out @NBCUniversal” announced on its social media that they will be the first gay group to march in New York City’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. They linked to NBC New York, which reported “Organizers of the world's largest St. Patrick's Day Parade say they're ending a ban and allowing a gay group to march under its own banner for the first time.”

The parade committee sent a statement to the Associated Press that the “lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender support group at the company that broadcasts the parade,” would be marching up Fifth Avenue “under an identifying banner.”

September 3, 2014, 8:36 AM EDT

A football game that ends up with a score of 71 to 23 would be considered a wipeout. But when a poll shows that’s the margin of support for keeping the name “Washington Redskins,” the pro-censorship Washington Post tries to find a silver lining. On the day the NFL season begins, the headline on the front page of the Sports section was “Support for name still mostly strong: ‘Redskins’ still heavily favored, but majority continues to shrink.”

As a pile of sensitive sports journalists boycott the name on print or on television, Post reporter Scott Clement tried to sell this puny 23 percent as encouraging progress:

September 2, 2014, 6:49 PM EDT

In Sunday’s Washington Post, former New York Times reporter Steven Roberts reviewed a new book by three professors called “Politics Is a Joke! How Comedians Are Remaking Political Life.”

Republican-leaning readers might be left with the strong impression that comedians now have way too much power in the political process, where the candidates have to scrape and beg before them:

September 2, 2014, 11:57 AM EDT

The Washington Post reported on Tuesday morning that publisher Katherine Weymouth was stepping down (as Amazon tycoon Jeff Bezos is now the owner), and former Politico executive Frederick Ryan is taking her place.

Post technology reporter Craig Timberg implied that the important/interesting part of Ryan’s resume is his “years rising in the Reagan administration, eventually becoming a top presidential aide and key leader in the construction of his presidential library and numerous other initiatives after Reagan left office in 1989.” This, he reports, will “raise questions about the direction” of the allegedly “nonideological” Post:

September 2, 2014, 7:41 AM EDT

Via Weasel Zippers, we learned the Los Angeles Times has a new term for illegal aliens in the work force: they’re “informal workers,” and that doesn’t mean they don’t arrive on the job in a tuxedo.

Times reporter Tiffany Hsu (a "UC Berkeley grad") began her Saturday story with the new I-word (and illegal immigrants also “labored unofficially” in "gray employment"):

September 1, 2014, 2:42 PM EDT

Over at Salon.com, feminist writer Amanda Marcotte is as consistent as the Parents Television Council in addressing MTV. PTC thinks it's a smutty channel, especially due to buzz-baiting sexual pranks like the twerking of Miley Cyrus at the 2013 show. Marcotte thinks if anything, MTV is behind the curve of cultural progress.

Marcotte believes that the "sex-obsessed Christian group" -- the PTC -- and other conservatives are spreading the "myth that our culture is oversexed." No, a myth would be that our culture is prim and proper and reticent to talk about sex or put nipple-slips or teenage orgies on TV. Marcotte thinks it's just so "retro" to try and hold the old-fashioned broadcast networks to any kind of limit on sex or sex talk:

September 1, 2014, 9:17 AM EDT

In May, actress Shailene Woodley upset the leftists by saying “No” to the question “Do you consider yourself a feminist?” Her first words to Time magazine were “No, because I love men.” Now actress Chloe Grace Moretz, five years younger than Woodley, is suggesting Woodley isn't very smart.

In the September issue of the women's-beauty magazine Allure – on which they make the 17-year-old “Diary of A Wimpy Kid” actress look like she’s 30 – Moretz whacked Woodley as failing to understand that feminism just means standing up for yourself, standing up for what other women have done for you:

September 1, 2014, 7:15 AM EDT

Billy Crystal held it together for a heart-warming tribute to Robin Williams at the Emmy Awards: "The brilliance was astounding. The relentless energy was kind of thrilling. I used to think if I could just put a saddle on him and stay on him for eight seconds I was going to do okay.”

But The Independent (U.K.) noticed that on Twitter, Williams was denounced as “racist” for a routine in which he mocked a woman in a hijab in Iran saying “Help me!” That’s apparently racist? Making a little fun that perhaps a woman in Iran wouldn't feel liberated?

August 31, 2014, 4:29 PM EDT

The Washington Post’s Kent Babb is one of those sports reporters who has to impose secular-progressive politics on the sports world, which he perceives as backward. Last spring, he was pushing for “inclusion” into the NFL for gay football player Michael Sam: “If Sam is not on an active roster when the season begins in early September, there’s likely to be much more discussion about whether America itself is more accepting of gays than its sports teams.”   

On the front of Sunday's sports section, Babb lamented there’s “No separation of church, college football in the South.” He summarized that "To many, the merging of cultural forces feels natural; to others, the most stark instances are uncomfortable — maybe even inappropriate." Babb began with Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze:

August 31, 2014, 9:25 AM EDT

Former AP reporter Matti Friedman has been quoted all over the blogosphere for his eye-opening article for Tablet magazine headlined “An Insider’s Guide to the Most Important Story on Earth.” Friedman, who reported for AP in Jerusalem from 2006 to 2011, offered a post-mortem on the latest fighting in the Gaza strip.

“When the hysteria abates, I believe the events in Gaza will not be remembered by the world as particularly important. People were killed, most of them Palestinians, including many unarmed innocents. I wish I could say the tragedy of their deaths, or the deaths of Israel’s soldiers, will change something, that they mark a turning point. But they don’t.”  The importance lies in the tone of international press coverage: