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By Tom Blumer | September 10, 2014 | 8:45 PM EDT

"Person on the street" interviews are among the more discouraging presentations one can find on news shows these days. All too often, we see low-information people who think they're so smart show us how disturbingly ignorant they actually are.

That they are disheartening doesn't mean they aren't sometimes entertaining. Fox News's Jesse Watters had one such segment on Monday. He interviewed eight women, several of them attractively endowed by their Creator, at the beach in Seaside Heights, New Jersey. Their intellectual prowess, however, was a bit lacking in certain instances, occasionally hilariously so, as Watters launched into questions about "powerful women":

By Matthew Balan | September 10, 2014 | 5:19 PM EDT

HBO's Bill Maher clashed with Charlie Rose on the veteran host's PBS show on Tuesday over the atheist's outspoken views on Islam. Maher underlined the "illiberal beliefs that are held by vast numbers of Muslim people." Rose countered with a left-wing talking point: "Vast number of Christians, too." The comedian shot back, "No, no. That's not true – not true. Vast numbers of Christians do not believe that if you leave the Christian religion, you should be killed for it."

By Kyle Drennen | September 10, 2014 | 4:41 PM EDT

Wednesday's NBC Today was the only network morning show to cover President Obama being refused tee times at several top golf courses during his Labor Day weekend trip to New York, with co-host Matt Lauer declaring: "...the President has faced some criticism recently over the time he spends playing golf....[now] more problems tied to his favorite hobby." [Listen to the audio]

Fellow co-host Willie Geist explained: "Club managers saying they didn't want to inconvenience their high-profile and dues-paying members by shutting down their courses to accommodate the President during the busy holiday weekend." Moments later, Geist seemed to fault the courses by labeling the refusals a "country club snub."

By Tom Blumer | September 10, 2014 | 4:05 PM EDT

In recent days, the State Department has tried to paint Fox News's Bill O'Reilly as a sexist monster because he characterized Jen Psaki as "out of her depth." O'Reilly's criticism has a great deal to do with how Ms. Psaki often appears to be, well, out of her depth. The other member of the non-dynamic duo then pounced. Marie Harf claimed that O'Reilly used "sexist, personally offensive language that I actually don't think (he) would ever use about a man."

O'Reilly recently defended himself quite well; that video is at the end of this post. On Tuesday, liberal Fox News contributor Kirsten Powers also weighed in. Her USA Today column asserted that O'Reilly "does not discriminate when it comes to expressing tough judgments," and that Harf's sexist accusation was "so irresponsible." Excerpts follow the jump (links are in original; bolds are mine):

By Scott Whitlock | September 10, 2014 | 12:59 PM EDT

Chris Matthews on Wednesday urged the American people to "grow up" and accept that war against ISIS will be a long, bloody struggle. At first, the cable host offered what sounded like a recitation of the cycle of violence argument: "You can't just keep killing people and not expect them to try to get even with us. You know what I mean? They're beheading people, they say, because we used air strikes against ISIS." He continued, "This is a cycle. So, we hit them with more air strikes. They'll do more against us." 

By Kyle Drennen | September 10, 2014 | 12:24 PM EDT

At the end of a report on Wednesday's NBC Today about President Obama's upcoming speech on combating ISIS terrorists, correspondent Peter Alexander sympathetically observed: "The primetime nature of this speech really underscores its stakes, but also a significant shift for this President, who wanted to leave the White House as a peacetime president. But now...is likely to commit the country to what some say could be another potentially costly military campaign." [Listen to the audio]

In the segment that followed, co-host Matt Lauer led off a discussion with Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd on that sentiment: "Peter just said the President wanted to leave office as a peacetime president. ISIS makes the decision whether he leaves as a wartime president." Todd replied: "He's been reluctant and we know over about a ten-day period he seemed to be the last one in his administration acknowledging that there needed to be a military campaign."

By Scott Whitlock | September 10, 2014 | 10:10 AM EDT

As of September 10, 2014, it's been 300 days since Nightline, a once serious news program, covered ObamaCare. In the 43 weeks since November 14, 2013, the show has avoided problems with the health care law and instead focused on extremely superficial topics, such as nude reality shows and the royal baby. 

By Matthew Balan | September 9, 2014 | 6:21 PM EDT

Don Lemon returned to the question of whether Islam is an inherently violent religion on Monday's CNN Tonight, as he interviewed Democratic Rep. Keith Ellison and author Reza Aslan. Lemon turned to his two Muslim guests for their take on a recent Tweet by atheist HBO host Bill Maher: "ISIS, one of thousands of Islamic militant groups beheads another. But by all means let's keep pretending all religions are alike."

By Kyle Drennen | September 9, 2014 | 3:53 PM EDT

In an interview with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand on Monday's NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer asked the New York Democrat about accusations in her new memoir of male congressional colleagues making sexist remarks to her and voiced his disappointment that she had not "named names" [Listen to the audio]:

A senator, this is a guy you admire, squeezed your waist from behind and told you not to lose too much weight because he likes his girls chubby. And you didn't name names. Why?...You also write in the book, "Comments about appearance belittle women professionally. We need to start to change it by calling out undercutting remarks and educating our peers." Why didn't you call them out?

By Scott Whitlock | September 9, 2014 | 12:30 PM EDT

A family spokesman for an American who was beheaded in Iraq appeared on CNN, Monday, and slammed the Obama administration's handling of the deaths. Barak Barfi accused the White House of playing a "game of bureaucratic infighting and Jim [Foley] and Steve [Sotloff] are pawns in that game and that's not fair." On Tuesday, ABC's Good Morning America and NBC's Today showed no interest in the condemnation of the Obama administration. 

By Kyle Drennen | September 9, 2014 | 11:29 AM EDT

On Tuesday, ABC's Good Morning America and NBC's Today, offered mere seconds on President Obama's approval rating hitting "near record lows" amid his reluctance to aggressively combat ISIS terrorists. CBS This Morning skipped any mention of the dismal poll numbers for the commander-in-chief.

On Good Morning America, after touting broad public support for the kind of military action against ISIS that Obama would likely announce in a Wednesday night address to the nation, co-host George Stephanopoulos noted: "It comes at a time when he's facing some real popularity problems. We see 56% of the country disapproving of how the President's handling foreign policy." [Listen to the audio]

By Ken Shepherd | September 9, 2014 | 8:30 AM EDT

In the midst of discussing the president's handling of the ISIS insurgency in Iraq and Syria on his Monday evening edition of Hardball, MSNBC's Chris Matthews railed against President Obama's use of the term "homeland" to describe America's home soil. But numerous presidents have used the term "homeland" in speeches, including Matthews's former boss, Jimmy Carter.