Sports

By Tim Graham | September 20, 2014 | 8:14 AM EDT

The Washington Post's Metro section on Saturday carried the headline "Redskins fans say 'Daily Show' misled them: Showdown with Native Americans Was a Surprise." Fans were set up for an ambush to be accused of racism, or loving a racist mascot.

In other words, once again, Jon Stewart's Comedy Central crew lied their faces off to an interview subject they wanted to mock. But this time, the liberal media didn't let it slide. Reporter Ian Shapira laid out just how much Team Stewart lied, and then said "No comment" when they were exposed.

By Mark Finkelstein | September 16, 2014 | 8:14 AM EDT

What's next, Mika?  Giant alligators in the sewers of New York City?  On today's Morning Joe, Mika Brzezinski perpetuated the hoary urban legend that domestic violence spikes on Super Bowl Sunday.

Brzezinski's blunder came in the context of the panel's discussion of the NFL's domestic violence mess. Arguing that football is a violent game and that "there's a connection" with what happens at home, Mika continued, "domestic violence on Super Bowl Sunday. We've seen the numbers. Why is that?" Actually, Brzezinski has apparently not seen the numbers, since that myth has been thoroughly debunked, often by organizations fighting domestic violence, as here, here and here.

By Tim Graham | September 7, 2014 | 9:29 AM EDT

Jason Howerton at The Blaze passed along this nugget from the CBS New York website: sports radio host Craig Carton, whose show with Boomer Esiason airs on the CBS Sports Network on cable, laid into the NFL following Peter King’s report that the NFL lobbied teams to pick up openly gay defensive tackle Michael Sam after he was released by the St. Louis Rams. They couldn't stand the "nightmare scenario" of Sam not making a team.

Carton called out the league over the plea that Sam and others pushed that he should be given a chance on the football merits, not some sort of gay affirmative action program:

By Ken Shepherd | September 4, 2014 | 9:36 PM EDT

With less than an hour to go until kickoff on the 2014 NFL season, NBC Sports kicked off a new season of predictably left-of-center political pontifications.

Holding that dubious honor tonight was Sports Illustrated senior writer and NBC Sports contributor Peter King, who, during pre-game analysis, insisted that the Dallas Cowboys signing rookie defensive end Michael Sam to their practice squad delivered the National Football League from a “nightmare situation” in which the first openly-gay NFL draftee failed to make a roster. No one else on the broadcast took exception to that line of argument. My colleague Curtis Houck transcribed the statement, which you can read below the page break [LISTEN to MP3 audio here; WATCH video below page break]:

By Tim Graham | September 3, 2014 | 8:36 AM EDT

A football game that ends up with a score of 71 to 23 would be considered a wipeout. But when a poll shows that’s the margin of support for keeping the name “Washington Redskins,” the pro-censorship Washington Post tries to find a silver lining. On the day the NFL season begins, the headline on the front page of the Sports section was “Support for name still mostly strong: ‘Redskins’ still heavily favored, but majority continues to shrink.”

As a pile of sensitive sports journalists boycott the name on print or on television, Post reporter Scott Clement tried to sell this puny 23 percent as encouraging progress:

By Tim Graham | August 31, 2014 | 4:29 PM EDT

The Washington Post’s Kent Babb is one of those sports reporters who has to impose secular-progressive politics on the sports world, which he perceives as backward. Last spring, he was pushing for “inclusion” into the NFL for gay football player Michael Sam: “If Sam is not on an active roster when the season begins in early September, there’s likely to be much more discussion about whether America itself is more accepting of gays than its sports teams.”   

On the front of Sunday's sports section, Babb lamented there’s “No separation of church, college football in the South.” He summarized that "To many, the merging of cultural forces feels natural; to others, the most stark instances are uncomfortable — maybe even inappropriate." Babb began with Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze:

By Tim Graham | August 22, 2014 | 2:22 PM EDT

The Washington Post editorial board (the group that writes every day’s unsigned editorials) announced with fanfare that they would no longer use the word “Redskins” as they continue to agitate for a change in the team name. So “while we wait for the National Football League to catch up with thoughtful opinion and common decency, we have decided that, except when it is essential for clarity or effect, we will no longer use the slur ourselves.”

“What we are discussing here is a change only for editorials. Unlike our colleagues who cover sports and other news, we on the editorial board have the luxury of writing about the world as we would like it to be,” they wrote in their best Robert F. Kennedy impression.

By Tim Graham | August 20, 2014 | 5:22 PM EDT

The Washington Post has been an eager booster of the crusade to strip the name "Redskins" from the NFL, with crusading sports columnist Mike Wise even making it into NBC's crusading piece on Tuesday. In Wednesday's sports section, on page 2, there was a small bit of balance.

Former Chicago Bears coach and ESPN analyst Mike Ditka thoroughly trashed the idea of banning "Redskins" from football, comments made in a new interview with Mike Richman of RedskinsHistorian.com. Ditka called it beyond stupid:

By Mark Finkelstein | August 13, 2014 | 9:37 AM EDT

President Obama is more "forceful" and "stubborn" about playing golf than he is about pushing through his policy agenda.  That was Dana Milbank's take on today's Morning Joe.  

As Joe Scarborough described it, earlier this week the normally left-leaning Milbank enjoyed a "12-minute honeymoon" with conservatives after his Washington Post column called Obama's decision to go golfing while the world burned an example of "tone deafness" if not outright "stupid stuff."  Milbank doubled down on the notion today with his suggestion that the president cares more about making it to the first tee than enacting his policy positions.  Milbank seemed frustrated with Obama's fecklessness. But if the president's love of the links keeps him from pushing his policies, conservatives should be saying "play on, Mr. President!"  View the video after the jump.

By Ann Coulter | June 25, 2014 | 10:16 PM EDT

I've held off on writing about soccer for a decade -- or about the length of the average soccer game -- so as not to offend anyone. But enough is enough. Any growing interest in soccer can only be a sign of the nation's moral decay.

(1) Individual achievement is not a big factor in soccer. In a real sport, players fumble passes, throw bricks and drop fly balls -- all in front of a crowd. When baseball players strike out, they're standing alone at the plate. But there's also individual glory in home runs, touchdowns and slam-dunks.

By Randy Hall | June 20, 2014 | 7:39 AM EDT

The debate over whether the National Football League team in the District of Columbia should change its name from the Washington Redskins to something “less offensive” was the subject when CNN Newsroom weekend anchor Don Lemon was a guest during The Tom Joyner Radio Show on Thursday.

Lemon started his commentary by talking about “bad words, words that you shouldn't say,” comparing the “N-word” to “the dreaded 'R-word'” as racially offensive terms. However, comedian Kevin Hart disagreed, noting that the only people being called “Redskins” are players on the professional football team.

By Ken Shepherd | June 12, 2014 | 10:43 PM EDT

All three major broadcast networks devoted stories to the opening of the World Cup today in Rio de Janeiro, but ABC's business interests arguably got in the way of objective reporting. ABC and her sister ESPN networks are, after all the exclusive "media rights licensees" to carry World Cup matches in the United States.

Reporting from Rio, ABC's Paula Faris devoted just one fleeting reference to the unrest in the streets (emphasis mine):