Government & Press

June 17, 2014 | 2:55 PM EDT

Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that pro-life organization Susan B. Anthony List should be allowed to challenge in court an Ohio state law that criminalizes making false statements in an election campaign. The law, which subjects individuals and groups to costly litigation, fines, and even jail time if they can't defend their political speech to bureaucrats and judges, was used in 2010 to intimidate billboard owners into rejecting the pro-life group's election advertising. The question of whether “somebody should be able to get into federal court,” in the words of Justice Kagan at oral argument, united both the left and right wings of the high Court given the obvious and repellent injury to free speech rights. 

Although it said that Susan B. Anthony List should have its day in court, the Court did not rule on the underlying merits of Ohio's false statements law. But that's not how left-wing commentators saw it. Immediately mischaracterizing the decision as endorsing a "right to lie," writers from across the Left used the decision to smear Susan B. Anthony List, in particular, and the political right, in general, as liars.

By Chuck Norris | June 16, 2014 | 10:20 PM EDT

Editor's Note: This was sent to the publishing syndicate as a two-parter. We have combined both parts into this one column post.

I have four colossal disagreements with how President Barack Obama cut the deal for the prisoner swap of five senior Taliban leaders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl; the former, the White House itself admits, could "absolutely" rejoin terrorist cells.

Sure, I have far more than four issues with how it all went down — for example, the absolute avoidance and disregard of constitutional submission and congressional consent. But this administration seems to have little regard for proper protocol with anything, so I'm going to focus here on a few different angles of argument.

By Cal Thomas | June 16, 2014 | 10:09 PM EDT

"It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain..." (The Gettysburg Address)

No life is more wasted than one lost in vain.

By Ken Shepherd | June 16, 2014 | 9:27 PM EDT

Earlier today, Washington Post columnist Melinda Henneberger favorably retweeted a story by NewsBusters alumna and Washington Free Beacon contributor Alana Goodman regarding newly-discovered audiotape of Hillary Clinton from an interview in the mid-1980s in which the likely 2016 presidential aspirant was rather lighthearted and occasionally laughing as she recalled a time where she successfully defended an accused child rapist by working out a plea deal for a much lighter sentence. "Defends man accused of raping 12-yr-old, laughs abt case RT @alanagoodman Hillary Tapes: http://wfb.tc/1iA2uMv v," Henneberger tweeted shortly after midnight on Monday.

Yet on the June 16 Hardball program -- on MSNBC, the nation's premiere "War on Women" network -- neither Henneberger nor Hardball anchor Chris Matthews nor Politico's Roger Simon broached the topic at any time during their discussion about the former secretary of state's rocky rollout of her Hard Choices memoir. Here's an excerpt of the June 15 story from Goodman (emphasis mine):

By Seton Motley | June 16, 2014 | 9:09 AM EDT

So it turns out there that something doesn't have to be true to be funny.

Many a thinking American - who knows media bias - finds the following perversely appropriate.

Young Get News From Comedy Central

Tom Brokaw, Peter Jennings, Dan Rather ... and Jon Stewart?

Readers over 30 might scoff at Stewart's inclusion - assuming they know who he is. For many under 30, the host of Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" is, improbably, a source for news.

By Ken Shepherd | June 13, 2014 | 6:00 PM EDT

Did you ever want to do a Bible study with Martin Bashir?

I ask because a few days ago the former MSNBCer, who once fantasized on air about former Gov. Sarah Palin being forced to eat human excrement, shared his observation in a tweet about one way in which the president can give his Amen to a lament of the biblical King David.

By NB Staff | June 12, 2014 | 5:13 PM EDT

Rep. Eric Cantor has only himself to blame for losing the respect, trust, and votes of Tea Party conservatives, and with it, his House seat in Virginia's 7th congressional district, For America chairman Brent Bozell explained on Wednesday's Kelly File [watch the full segment here or by clicking play on the embed below the page break]:

By Mark Finkelstein | June 12, 2014 | 9:29 AM EDT

Q. How do you know that Barack Obama's feckless foreign policy poses a serious threat to the security of the free world?  A. When a leading foreign policy voice of the Washington Post agrees with a leading foreign policy voice of the Wall Street Journal that such is the case.

It happened on today's Morning Joe, when WaPo's highly-respected David Ignatius agreed with a WSJ op-ed by Daniel Henninger, "While Obama Fiddles," that darkly concludes: "past some point, the world's wildfires are going to consume the Obama legacy. And leave his successor a nightmare." Said Ignatius: "those are harsh words from the Wall Street Journal, but I think there's a lot of truth to them." View the video after the jump.

By Ann Coulter | June 11, 2014 | 10:51 PM EDT

Economics professor Dave Brat crushed House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the Republican primary Tuesday night, in a campaign that was mostly about Cantor's supporting amnesty for 11 million illegal aliens.

This marks the first time a U.S. House majority leader has ever lost a primary election.

By Ken Shepherd | June 11, 2014 | 10:10 PM EDT

Comparing Hillary Clinton's book tour to an "out of town play getting ready in New Haven," MSNBC's Chris Matthews tonight dismissed the former secretary of state's tone-deaf "dead broke" line from her interview with ABC's Diane Sawyer as a "small kind of gaffe, or even a half gaffe." [MP3 audio here; video embed follows page break]

"Once she said we were $12 million in the hole, I think people should have understood what she meant," Matthews asserted to his guest, NBC's Cynthia McFadden, whose fawning interview was aired on Tuesday's Nightly News. Indeed, the former first lady is quite capably "tuning up" her performance as her book tour rolls along. For her part, McFadden seemed to agree, replying:

By Ken Shepherd | June 11, 2014 | 6:52 PM EDT

Editors at MSNBC.com trimmed down Republican congressional nominee Dave Brat's June 11 phone interview with MSNBC's Chuck Todd in order to paint him as dodging questions from the Daily Rundown host. 

But a review of the full interview [listen to the mp3 audio here] shows that Brat had already and seemingly quite gladly answered a few policy questions on such hot issues as the minimum wage, immigration reform, and his stance on Wall Street's influence on the business wing of the GOP.

By Ken Shepherd | June 10, 2014 | 8:02 PM EDT

Troubled by a recent poll number showing 52 percent of independent voters approve of a select congressional committee investigating the Benghazi fiasco, MSNBC's Chris Matthews offered former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton his messaging advice on the matter during a segment of the June 10 Hardball.

It boiled down to: "sometimes you get killed, and that's part of the business." The relevant transcript follows the page break (emphasis mine; MP3 audio here; video follows page break):