NBC’s Chris Jansing Hits Missouri Gov. From Left on Ferguson, Ignores His ‘Vigorous Prosecution’ Comments

Chris Jansing, NBC News Chief White House Correspondent, filled in as moderator on Meet the Press and did her best to hit Governor Jay Nixon (D-MO) from the left over his handling of the ongoing violence in Ferguson, Missouri. 

Speaking on Sunday, August 24, Jansing promoted liberal talking points surrounding the police tactics used to stop the violent protests in the Missouri town. Furthermore, the NBC reporter ignored Governor Nixon’s recent controversial comments in which he called for a “vigorous prosecution” of the police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown. [See video below.] 

Jansing began the interview by wondering if the police presence in Ferguson had contributed to the violence: 

A lot of concerns were raised when we saw the heavily armored vehicles rolling into Ferguson. We also saw police in camouflage carrying heavy weapons. Let me ask you about the president's decision to review these Pentagon policies of giving this equipment to localities. Do you think it contributed to the unrest that happened in your state?

As the segment continued, the NBC reporter hit the Democratic governor from the left over his decision to not remove the prosecutor assigned to the Michael Brown case: 

Let me ask you about that prosecution, particularly the one that's going on in your state as opposed to the federal investigation. And you made a decision in the last week not to replace the controversial prosecutor Robert McCullough. In fact, what you said in making that decision was that to do so would potentially jeopardize the prosecution. How?..Do you believe he has the trust of the people of your state and the people of Ferguson? 

Later on, Jansing had the opportunity to ask her guest about his controversial comments in which he lobbied for a “vigorous prosecution” of the police officer involved in the shooting, but instead lamented the repercussions for Ferguson if no charges are filed in the case:

How concerned are you, and this has been expressed by a number of people, that if there is not a decision to prosecute in this case, if charges are not brought, that there will be more unrest? Are you prepared for that? And give us a sense of your level of concern. 

Given that Jansing used to be a host for the liberal MSNBC, one would hope that when she made the transition to NBC’s Chief White House Correspondent she would have left her liberal leanings behind. Unfortunately, it seems that the NBC reporter is unable, or unwilling, to give up her liberal tendencies even though she is now tasked with being an objective reporter for NBC News. 

See relevant transcript below. 


NBC

Meet the Press

August 24, 2014

CHRIS JANSING: Now I want to turn to the latest on Ferguson, Missouri. President Obama has called for a review of federal programs to militarize local police over concern about the armed force used during the unrest in Ferguson. And joining me is the Democratic Governor of Missouri Jay Nixon. 

(BEGIN TAPE) 

CHRIS JANSING: Welcome, Governor Nixon. 

GOV. JAY NIXON: Good morning.

JANSING: As you know, a lot of concerns were raised when we saw the heavily armored vehicles rolling into Ferguson. We also saw police in camouflage carrying heavy weapons. Let me ask you about the president's decision to review these Pentagon policies of giving this equipment to localities. Do you think it contributed to the unrest that happened in your state?

NIXON: Well, certainly appropriate to review all of that sort of thing, and I'm glad the president and others around the country will do that discussion. There are times when you need to have protection on bomb units and whatnot, but the bottom line is it's a good and worthy discussion that we ought to have around the country.

JANSING: And when you look at what happened in Ferguson, should it have been done differently? 

NIXON: Well, when you look at this you can certainly see things that you could have done and work with that you hope would focus things a little bit better. But when we came in here, we were focused on three things: Making sure people had the right to speak, making sure that they were safe in that community, and also making sure that the dual prosecutions that were going would get to justice and truth. And in that regard, we've seen a lot of progress over the last week. 

JANSING: Well, let me ask you about that prosecution, particularly the one that's going on in your state as opposed to the federal investigation. And you made a decision in the last week not to replace the controversial prosecutor Robert McCullough. In fact, what you said in making that decision was that to do so would potentially jeopardize the prosecution. How? 

NIXON: Well, first of all, you have an elected prosecutor. He should do his job, do his duty, as the attorney general, as will quite frankly do their duties. I think you focus on making sure that they live up to the high standards that are out there, making sure that they get all the information so that justice can be served. 

JANSING: Do you believe he has the trust of the people of your state and the people of Ferguson? 

NIXON: He was elected overwhelmingly by the people a number of times. He's been through a lot. Certainly with this level of attention I think everyone will work hard to do their best work. 

JANSING: How concerned are you, and this has been expressed by a number of people, that if there is not a decision to prosecute in this case, if charges are not brought, that there will be more unrest? Are you prepared for that? And give us a sense of your level of concern. 

NIXON: Well, as I've said before, we've been working hard over the last two weeks, but especially the last eight or nine days, to really see progress. And I'm heartened by that. And that's really come from the people here. I mean, the policing strategies and all that sort stuff's important, and Captain Johnson and his team on the ground, the unified command have done a great job. But really what's happened is the people of this region have said, "We want to speak, but we want to do so peacefully."

And I think that transition's a positive transition. They just want to make sure that what has happened over the last two weeks is not swept under the rug and forgotten, and that instead it's used to get positive action, not only in the community of Ferguson and around St. Louis, but around the country. 

JANSING: So let me ask you what you say, not just to people in Missouri to but people around the country. Six in ten blacks in a new poll say that they don't believe that they have confidence that the investigation will be handled fairly. What do you say to them? 

NIXON: Well, first of all, I think with a lot of attention on it and a lot of focus on it and dual efforts going on at the same time, one at federal, one at the state, and a lot of public attention, I think they have the chance to get it right. And the justice system, with that much focus, these folks just need to do their duty.

And with that, that includes prosecutors and jury members and grand jury members and everyone, and citizens who have things to say that can be helpful in those cases. So we have to work hard to make sure that everybody does their best and is strong in this effort. And if they do, then it's our best hope that justice will be served. 

JANSING: Governor Jay Nixon, thank you. 

NIXON: Thank you.

Jeffrey Meyer
Jeffrey Meyer
Jeffrey Meyer is a News Analyst at the Media Research Center.