Ronan Farrow on Hillary Clinton's Memoir: 'Literature Isn't Dead'

You can take the boy genius out of the Hillary Clinton State Department, but you can’t take the Hillary Clinton acolyte out of the boy.

On the May 27 edition of Ronan Farrow Daily, the former special advisor to ex-Secretary of State treated viewers to a segment devoted to his former employer which lasted over five minutes long, a fairly long stretch of time for an hour-long news program. [See video below. Click here for MP3 audio]

Farrow began with a clip of Karl Rove stating that Americans will be looking for something “new” in the next election. The MSNBC host, insulted by Rove’s perception of the American political climate, childishly retorted that Rove was the “old and stale” politician, unlike, well, Mrs. Clinton, who last won a federal election nearly eight years ago.

Later in the segment Farrow played a random clip from Clinton’s audio book and approvingly raved, “Literature isn’t dead.”

If Farrow wishes to avoid becoming an “old and stale” broadcaster with dangerously-low ratings, he may want to lay off the obsequious Clinton puffery.

See transcript below.

5/27/2014
Ronan Farrow Daily
1:29 PM
1 minute and 25 seconds

RONAN FARROW: Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue. Or just something old and stale, according to Karl Rove.

KARL ROVE: We are, you know, 20 years past the point at which Bill Clinton was elected president. In American politics, there's a sense that you want to be new, that you don't want to be too familiar, you want to be something fresh. You don't want to be something that's old and stale.

FARROW: No, he's not talking about himself. He's talking about Hillary Clinton. First she's brain damaged, now she's old and stale. They really know how to make a gal feel good about herself, don't you, Karl? One of a new are flurry of attacks as hype heats up for Hillary Clinton’s new memoir, ‘The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pantsuit.’ Kidding it’s called Hard Choices. Today we’re getting a first look at those hard choices. This morning the book's publisher released the text and audio of her four-page author's note. In it, she talks about why she decided to write the book and some of the challenges she's met throughout her career.

HILLARY CLINTON AUDIO: When I chose to leave a career as a young lawyer in Washington to move to Arkansas to marry Bill, and start a family, my friends asked -- are you out of your mind? I heard similar questions when I took on health care reform as First Lady, ran for office myself, and accepted President Barack Obama's offer to represent our country as Secretary of State.

FARROW: Literature isn't dead.

Laura Flint
Laura Flint is a 2014 summer intern for the MRC's News Analysis Division.