Paul Krugman Cries 'Media Malpractice' Over Claim That ObamaCare Will Cut Jobs

Liberal columnist Paul Krugman ludicrously blamed the press for "malpractice" in reporting that ObamaCare would cut two million full-time  jobs. Krugman made his remarks on Thursday night's Colbert Report.

"I see a lot of media malpractice, because a lot of the news orgs got it wrong. The CBO did not say that," Krugman responded to host Stephen Colbert's claim that "2.5 million people fewer will have jobs by 2021." [MP3 audio available here; video below the jump]

Krugman spun the report as a positive:

"No jobs lost. We're talking about people choosing to work less. And actually the CBO says in big – they say right up there, this is going to be voluntary choice. People will choose to work less. They made the mistake of saying this will be the equivalent of two million full-time jobs being removed. But the next day, the director of the CBO went on to say we are not talking about job losses. And in fact, by and large – this is a good thing."

Yet Krugman's cry of "malpractice" is silly after the media either ignored the CBO or gave a White House-friendly spin. Examples abound, here, here, here, and here.

Below is a transcript of the segment:


COMEDY CENTRAL
COLBERT REPORT
2/6/14
[11:52 p.m. EST]

STEPHEN COLBERT: Because I get to gloat over the fact that ObamaCare is a proven job killer. The CBO came out with a report that says 2.5 million people fewer will have jobs by 2021 because of ObamaCare. Would you like to apologize to America for helping to promote this job killer?

PAUL KRUGMAN: This is a really quite amazing piece of – I see a lot of media malpractice, because a lot of the news orgs got it wrong. The CBO did not say that.

COLBERT: Oh yes, they did. Oh yes, they did. Have you read the report? Have you read the report?

KRUGMAN: Yes I have.

COLBERT: I have not. That way I get to claim anything I want, Paul Krugman.

KRUGMAN: So what the CBO said, which we've known, but they've upped their estimate a little bit, we know there are a number people will choose, once they have the guarantee of health insurance, there are a lot of people in America who are working extra hours, staying in full-time jobs, because they need the health insurance. There's parents of young children, there's older people, you know, who are 63, and not in good health but they're hanging on with those full-time jobs until they can get Medicare. With the law in effect, a fair number – some people – will work shorter hours. Some people will retire earlier. So the total number of hours will be reduced, voluntarily. People will choose to work less.

No jobs lost. We're talking about people choosing to work less. And actually the CBO says in big – they say right up there, this is going to be voluntary choice. People will choose to work less. They made the mistake of saying this will be the equivalent of two million full-time jobs being removed. But the next day, the director of the CBO went on to say we are not talking about job losses. And in fact, by and large – this is a good thing.
 

Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro
Matt Hadro was a News Analyst for the Media Research Center's News Analysis Division from 2010 through early 2014