Rolling Stone

By Matthew Balan | September 19, 2014 | 4:59 PM EDT

CNN's Twitter account on Thursday boosted a Rolling Stone article that hyped the far-left Occupy Wall Street movement's latest efforts. The social media post touted, "Think #OccupyWallStreet is dead? Think again. This short-lived occupation is still fighting for five key issues," and linked to Rebecca Nathanson's Wednesday piece on the "five campaigns that OWS-inspired groups have continued to fight for since the movement's presumed conclusion."

By Brent Baker | August 9, 2014 | 9:16 PM EDT

Reid Cherlin, an Assistant Press Secretary during the first two years plus of the Obama administration, managed to deliver two laugh-worthy howlers in a piece for Rolling Stone posted this past Monday:

> “Barack Obama never had reporters eating out of his hand the way that right-wingers love to allege.”

> “I...believe he’ll be remembered as an excellent President.”

By Sean Long | July 16, 2014 | 10:00 AM EDT

Rolling Stone just proved that you don’t need to know anything about firearms in order to blog an attack on them.

On July 14, Rolling Stone magazine released a “specific look at the weapons criminals prefer,” which they called the “5 Most Dangerous Guns in America.” Of course, they proved that they know next to nothing about the gun industry by lumping together almost every type of firearm into a quick list.

By Tim Graham | June 26, 2014 | 10:06 PM EDT

Does anyone remember the Reagan-Bush internment camps after the discovery of the AIDS virus? No?

Rolling Stone reported that former R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe declared at a taping of a show for Viacom’s Logo channel that he was afraid to get an HIV test in the 1980s for fear of the right-wing oppression that would result. He waited five years out of progressive paranoia.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | June 6, 2014 | 10:37 AM EDT

The feminist film critics can exhale now. Someone has finally concocted their dream movie: an “abortion comedy.” Because apparently nothing sounds funnier than an unplanned one-night stand and a courageous destruction of God's most beautiful and most innocent creation.

It's called "Obvious Child." Feminist lingo sells this monstrosity. Former “Saturday Night Live” cast member Jenny Slate plays Donna Stern, a standup comedian who “is forced to face the uncomfortable realities of independent womanhood for the first time.” A “drunken hookup – and epic lapse in prophylactic judgment – turns out to be the beginning of a hilarious and totally unplanned journey of self-discovery and empowerment.”

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | June 6, 2014 | 10:37 AM EDT

The feminist film critics can exhale now. Someone has finally concocted their dream movie: an “abortion comedy.” Because apparently nothing sounds funnier than an unplanned one-night stand and a courageous destruction of God's most beautiful and most innocent creation.

It's called "Obvious Child." Feminist lingo sells this monstrosity. Former “Saturday Night Live” cast member Jenny Slate plays Donna Stern, a standup comedian who “is forced to face the uncomfortable realities of independent womanhood for the first time.” A “drunken hookup – and epic lapse in prophylactic judgment – turns out to be the beginning of a hilarious and totally unplanned journey of self-discovery and empowerment.”

By Katie Yoder | June 2, 2014 | 3:09 PM EDT

Here’s a new oxymoron, even for the liberal media: abortion comedy. 

Opening this Friday, writer-director Gillian Robespierre’s “Obvious Child” tells the story of an aspiring young comedian, Donna Stern, who has an abortion after a one-night stand. The film, which focuses on “self-discovery and empowerment” and the “realities of independent womanhood,” garnered endorsements not only from Planned Parenthood and NARAL, but also the media as an “abortion romantic comedy.” The film starring Jenny Slate (“SNL,” “Parks and Recreation”) caught the attention of distributor A24 after premiering at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year. 

By Tim Graham | April 10, 2014 | 6:59 AM EDT

Rolling Stone's latest issue is designed to start a buzz again. It's Julia Louis-Dreyfuss (at age 53) in the nude, with an image of the Constitution on her back to promote her HBO series "Veep." We know it's unlikely most Veeps would jump at the chance to pose naked for Rolling Stone. Maybe Joe Biden.

Anyway, the nudity hasn't been as scandalous as the cheeky decision to have John Hancock's historic large signature at the bottom of the Constitution image -- when John Hancock's signature appeared on the Declaration of Independence. How many Rolling Stone readers might notice through the bong haze?

By Tim Graham | February 21, 2014 | 7:00 AM EST

The New York Times defined it as newsworthy that Rolling Stone's hard-left fancifier-fulminator Matt Taibbi is taking a new job with Pierre Omidyar's First Look Media. The headline was bland: "Start-Up Site Hires Critic of Wall St." The Times had no ideological label except "fierce critic of Wall Street." That's probably about the label Karl Marx would get if he wrote today.

The account was short enough to somehow exclude Taibbi's infamous 2005 article on "52 Funniest Things About the Upcoming Death of the Pope." The Times account waited until the end to quote typically rabid or possibly drug-fueled Taibbi passages, puffing it as "vivid writing and colorful language" in a "now-famous metaphor" (which a quick Nexis search demonstrates The New York Times has now quoted 24 times):

By Brent Bozell | February 8, 2014 | 7:47 AM EST

The nastiest corners of popular culture in Hollywood and Manhattan usually love nothing better than denying their filthiness by hectoring orthodox Christians for the sex scandals lurking behind their "judgmental" ways. But the last few weeks have shown that the current aura around Pope Francis, and the false hope that he'll "go native" with the permissive crowd, is exploited in a different way.

Rolling Stone put Pope Francis on the cover, which hardly puts a practicing Catholic's mind at ease. But perhaps it was only natural that this weed-and-leftist-screed magazine would try to absolve itself for its horrendous James Dean-like cover of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

By Tom Blumer | January 4, 2014 | 6:37 PM EST

It's hard to know what's more ridiculously entertaining when choosing between Jesse A. Myerson's "Five Economic Reforms Millennials Should Be Fighting For," the illogical screed in Rolling Stone which would lead to the enslavement of those about whom he claims to be concerned, or Myerson's tweets as the opprobrium has poured in.

Since Noel Sheppard at NewsBusters has handled Myerson's original work, I'll have fun with the tweets. And it will be a pleasure to turn around Saul Alinsky's Fifth Rule for Radicals ("Ridicule is man’s most potent weapon").

By Noel Sheppard | January 4, 2014 | 2:14 PM EST

The next time you wonder just how far to the left Rolling Stone magazine is, consider that in its first issue of the new year, it actually published an article calling for capitalism to be totally abolished in America and replaced with a socialist structure wherein people didn't need to work, all assets were taken over by the government, and redistributed to the masses.

Fasten your seatbelts before continuing further: