By Tom Blumer | August 21, 2015 | 4:16 PM EDT

The time stamp on an Associated Press report on Hillary Clinton's email "worries" ("CLINTON FACING FRESH WORRIES IN CONGRESS OVER EMAILS") by Ken Thomas and Julie Bykowicz this morning is 11:21 a.m. Eastern Time.

Despite that time stamp, the report fails to mention a bombshell report from Reuters ("Dozens of Clinton emails were classified from the start, U.S. rules suggest") originally posted at 5:17 a.m. (time stamp has since been updated). Going even further back, the AP story fails to mention a Thursday afternoon story about how "A federal judge has ordered the State Department to cooperate with the investigation into the Hillary Clinton private email scandal." The decision to ignore these developments is in all likelihood deliberate.

By Tim Graham | August 19, 2015 | 5:20 PM EDT

While critics of Planned Parenthood might wonder how the nation’s largest abortion provider is going to dig out from a video about cutting through baby faces to sell brains, the Reuters wire service is happy to help dig the abortion advocates out. Their story on Wednesday was headlined “Americans back federal funds for Planned Parenthood health services: poll”.

Planned Parenthood boss Cecile Richards was thrilled to tweet out this story about a new Reuters-Ipsos poll. Reporter Emily Stephenson began with the usual tilt: all the risks here in politics land on the Republicans who question Planned Parenthood. 

By Tom Blumer | August 11, 2015 | 3:31 PM EDT

Two wire service dispatches covering the government's June Wholesale Sales and Inventories release either glossed over or completely ignored what others are saying about the report's impact on near-term economic growth.

The final sentence of an unbylined Reuters report vaguely referred to future impact by indicating that current inventory balances, which are bloated by historical standards, "would weigh on manufacturing and economic growth" (i.e., have a negative impact). Both Reuters and the AP's Josh Boak completely ignored a leading GDP forecaster's estimate that inventory buildups seen during the second quarter will cause a significant third-quarter pullback which will also knock down third-quarter economic growth considerably — and that was before today's news that the June buildup was even greater than expected. Boak's report also contained an utterly unsupportable "things are getting better" statement.

By Tom Blumer | August 9, 2015 | 10:25 AM EDT

On Wednesday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency committed an act which would have likely become instant national news if a private entity had done the same thing.

On Friday, John Merline at Investors' Business Daily succinctly noted that the EPA "dumped a million gallons of mine waste into Animas River in Colorado, turning it into what looked like Tang, forcing the sheriff's office to close the river to recreational users." Oh, and it "also failed to warn officials in downstream New Mexico about the spill." Yet here we are four days later, and the story has gotten very little visibility outside of center-right blogs and outlets. That's largely explained by how the wire services have handled the story. After the jump, readers will see headlines and descriptions of the stories which have appeared thus far at the web site of the New York Times:

By Randy Hall | July 29, 2015 | 8:20 PM EDT

During Wednesday's White House press briefing, Julia Edwards -- a reporter for the Reuters news service -- asked Press Secretary Josh Earnest if President Barack Obama would respond to the “growing outcry” over the killing of Cecil, a well-loved lion in a Zimbabwe park that was hunted down by Minnesota dentist Walter James Palmer.

“Is the White House or is President Obama aware of this killing,” she asked, “and what could the president do, on an executive level, to possibly keep U.S. trophy hunters from traveling to Africa and committing other killings?”

By Tom Blumer | July 28, 2015 | 6:08 PM EDT

The Conference Board's July Consumer Confidence report released earlier today threw a heavy dose of cold water on the idea that the economy might finally achieve a broad-based, genuine recovery this year.

Despite month after month of "all is well" reporting — and excuse-making when all hasn't been well — from the U.S. business press, the American public has apparently finally figured out that all is far from well. July's overall reading of 90.9 was 8.9 points lower than June's 99.8, the biggest single-month drop in almost four years — something Reuters and Bloomberg News noted, but which, as would be expected, the Associated Press, the nation's de facto news gatekeeper, failed to report.

By Tom Blumer | July 24, 2015 | 6:48 PM EDT

Thanks to year-over-year declines in manufacturing orders, manufacturing shipments, and wholesale sales, along with bloated inventories, apologists for the current condition of the U.S. economy are down to three defenses supposedly demonstrating that all is still really well after yet another rough first quarter (once again excused away as due to supposedly historically awful winter weather).

One of the three is that the housing market, particularly for new homes, is in a genuine recovery. Effective today, we can scratch at least the new-home element of that claim. The Census Bureau told us today that seasonally adjusted new-home sales fell by 7 percent in June, after May's originally strong figure was also revised down by 5 percent. The raw data showed that the number of new homes sold in June — supposedly peak season for new home purchases — was the same as the number sold in February.

By Tom Blumer | July 20, 2015 | 6:54 PM EDT

The company officially known as the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. has filed for bankruptcy for the second time in five years. This time around, the storied "A&P" name may completely disappear.

Coverage at USA Today by Nathan Bomey notes that "About 93% (of its workers) are represented by one of 12 different unions, and many of them have bumping rights that the company has described as a big barrier to reducing costs." Coverage at two of the three major business wire services, the Associated Press and Reuters, failed to mention the word "union" at all.

By Tom Blumer | July 15, 2015 | 11:44 PM EDT

The serious sales slumps combined with inventory buildups in manufacturing and wholesale industries, documented in previous NewsBusters posts, continues. So does the establishment press's determination to ignore them.

At the Associated Press today, Christopher Rugaber was tasked to cover the Federal Reserve's June release on Industrial Production. The good news is that the Fed report showed an overall increase (+0.3 percent) for the first time in three months. The bad news is that none of it came in manufacturing, which was flat as a pancake for the second straight month. The net sum of the monthly manufacturing declines so far this year is -0.3 percent. While Rugaber concentrated his attention where it belonged, i.e., on manufacturing, since it makes up 75 percent of all industrial activity, he still managed to come up with all kinds of explanations for the lack of progress — except the two most obvious (bold is mine):

By Tom Blumer | July 3, 2015 | 10:52 PM EDT

The folks at Reuters issued a pretty sloppy video yesterday relating to the government's June jobs report.

That videos described yesterday's reported jobs gains of 223,000 as "broad-based." That's true only if you think having 222,000 of yeaterday's those seasonally adjusted gains occurring in service industries, while only 1,000 were seen in goods-producing industries, is "broad-based":

By Tom Blumer | June 24, 2015 | 10:56 PM EDT

The politically correct speech police are everywhere these days. Many members of the leftist establishment have taken it upon themselves to aid in their enforcement efforts. No one is safe — not even the person they want us to believe is destined to be the Democrats' 2016 presidential nominee.

Yesterday, at a Florissant, Missouri church only five miles from Ferguson, Hillary Clinton uttered the following words in succession: "All lives matter." NPR's Tamara Keith and Amita Kelly devoted much of their four-minute "Morning Edition" report on her appearance to what was described as a "3-Word Misstep."

By Joseph Rossell | June 19, 2015 | 12:34 PM EDT

Although labeled as “The Great Debate,” a Reuters story about the necessity of drastic change to avert “the climate apocalypse that has already begun” was anything but a debate.

Slate Magazine’s Bitwise tech columnist David Auerbach wrote that June 18 Reuters column with the dramatic headline: “A child born today may live to see humanity’s end, unless…” He promoted Australian microbiologist Frank Fenner’s claim that humans could be extinct in 100 years because of “overcrowding, denuded resources and climate change.”