Radio

By Jack Coleman | April 25, 2014 | 7:10 PM EDT

Silly you, all this time thinking that disasters are a bad thing. Thom Hartmann knows so much better.

Hartmann, who touts himself as "The King of Progressive Talk" and is listed 10th on Talker Magazine's ranking of the top 100 radio hosts in America, made a claim on his show this week that neatly encapsulates what passes for economic wisdom among liberals. (Audio after the jump)

By Jack Coleman | April 21, 2014 | 4:55 PM EDT

Fresh from his recent threat to shoot a National Rifle Association board member, radical leftist radio talker Mike Malloy has staked another claim deep in the murky terrain of moonbat territory by asking whether quintessential gonzo journalist Hunter Thompson was murdered.

Thompson, notorious for his unhinged behavior and prodigious consumption of illicit drugs and alcohol, shot himself to death at his home near Aspen, Colo., in February 2005. In the near-decade since Thompson's demise, I can't recall a single person at any point along the political spectrum -- even on the fringes -- who has expressed doubt that Thompson committed suicide. Until Malloy did just that on his radio show last week. (Audio after the jump)

By Paul Bremmer | April 18, 2014 | 12:36 PM EDT

Al Sharpton entered truly ludicrous territory during an appearance Wednesday on Tom Joyner’s radio show. While talking about the meaning of Easter, the Baptist minister and MSNBC host dragged President Obama into the mix:

"As I looked at President Obama at our convention last Friday, where all he took he’s been able to rise politically again, I’m not comparing him to Jesus, but I am saying that to every crucifixion there is a resurrection for those that believe." [YouTube video embedded below.]
 

By Jack Coleman | April 17, 2014 | 7:34 PM EDT

Does it get more laughable in media when Ed Schultz accuses others of being incendiary?

Schultz's years-long obsession and resentment of conservative commentator Sean Hannity, and of Fox News, surfaced once again yesterday when he criticized Hannity and fellow Fox News personality Mike Huckabee for their remarks about Cliven Bundy, the Nevadan rancher locked in a dispute with the federal Bureau of Land Management over cattle grazing fees. (Audio clips after the jump)

By Tom Blumer | April 15, 2014 | 9:27 PM EDT

After his Masters victory, pro golfer Bubba Watson celebrated with his family at a Waffle House. Pictures tweeted from there went viral. Waffle House appreciated the appreciation.

What's not to like about this great story? Apparently some self-appointed nanny state-loving guardians of nutrition like Katherine Tallmadge believe that Watson set a bad example for Americans by eating there. Oh, and with her powers of telepathy, she just knows that Watson's a complete phony about what he really eats. She went after Watson on one of Neil Cavuto's Fox programs yesterday, and in doing so caught talk show host Rush Limbaugh's attention.

By Jack Coleman | April 13, 2014 | 7:51 AM EDT

When it comes to a manufactured issue such as unequal pay between men and women, a disparity that exists only in the aggregate and evaporates among individuals, you can expect to hear a fair number of suspect claims.

But an assertion made by National Organization for Women president Terry O'Neill while a guest on Ed Schultz's radio show last week, talking about the proposed Paycheck Fairness Act, went beyond suspicious toward something more closely resembling the inane. (Audio) --

By Matthew Balan | April 10, 2014 | 4:59 PM EDT

NPR's Terry Gross anticipated the Christian holy day of Easter on Monday's Fresh Air by boosting "popular" author Bart Ehrman's latest book, where the agnostic scholar asserted that "Jesus himself didn't call himself God and didn't consider himself God, and that none of his disciples had any inkling at all that he was God." During the segment, Gross wondered if "Christians made the claim that Jesus is God in order...to grow from being a small cult."

Ehrman also claimed, "I don't think Jesus was given a decent burial – that he was probably thrown into a common grave of some kind," and that the early disciples of Jesus probably hallucinated his resurrection:

By Jack Coleman | April 10, 2014 | 2:32 PM EDT

It was nearly three years ago that libtalker Ed Schultz demeaned conservative radio host Laura Ingraham as a "talk slut" and "right wing slut" after she had the gall to criticize President Obama during his May 2011 trip to Ireland. Even though Schultz's outburst came on his radio show, he was suspended from his MSNBC program for a week, allegedly at his behest, though the claim is dubious as I wrote at the time.

On her radio show Monday, Ingraham was the first to broadcast an incendiary clip of Schultz arguing with a caller, disparaging him as an "a**hole" and bellowing at him to "get the f*** out of here!" (Audio clips after the jump)

By Matthew Balan | April 9, 2014 | 4:10 PM EDT

NPR's resident ObamaCare shill Julie Rovner did her best to promote the next ObamaCare enrollment period during a segment on Wednesday's Morning Edition. Rovner featured two talking heads from liberal organization Families USA, which she identified as merely a "consumer group," and boosted their list of suggested changes for the sign-up process.

The correspondent failed to bring on any critics of the controversial law, and played up the apparent success of the first enrollment period:

By Jack Coleman | April 8, 2014 | 7:36 PM EDT

"Koke adds life where there isn't any," warned the Clash about cocaine back in 1980, a year that shook the ground under American politics. The Koch -- pronounced "Koke" -- brothers, David and Charles (though not sibling Bill, for the time being) serve a comparably stimulative role for liberals in 2014, another election year with seismic potential.

In recent weeks, self-proclaimed working-class hero Ed Schultz has shown he can barely pass a waking hour without vilifying the cursed Kochs. Yesterday Schultz regurgitated a persistent leftist falsehood about them and did so in a way that showed he wasn't even sure about the claim. (Audio after the jump)

By Matthew Balan | April 7, 2014 | 5:12 PM EDT

Carrie Johnson's Monday report on NPR's Morning Edition could have been mistaken as an informercial for the left-of-center ACLU and the NAACP's efforts to help "protect minority voting rights," after the Supreme Court's Shelby County v. Holder decision from June 2013. Johnson played up how "a divided Supreme Court gutted part of that law – throwing into chaos a system that had required...states to ask for federal permission before making election changes."

All but one of the correspondent's talking heads during the segment were liberal activists who lamented the Court's decision, but she failed to point out their political ideology or that of the groups they represent. Johnson also singled out one attendee of the organizations' "training session," who attacked the Obama administration from the left:

By Matthew Balan | April 4, 2014 | 10:10 PM EDT

Jim Edwards, the deputy editor of the Business Insider website, and Slate.com's tech reporter Will Oremus slammed former Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich on the Friday edition of BBC World Service's World Have Your Say program. Edwards likened Eich's $1,000 donation in support of California's Proposition 8 to someone who "donated some money to the KKK." The editor also repeatedly accused the tech executive of "donating money that strip people of their civil rights."

The Business Insider editor later compared the former CEO's support of traditional marriage to supporting the "the civil right to own slaves," and defended this comparison, since "slavery is all about stripping other people of their rights, which is what being against gay marriage is all about." Oremus agreed with Edwards in labeling Eich's political donation as "beyond the pale," and defended the internal and external campaign by social leftists to force his departure: [MP3 audio available here]