Radio

By Tim Graham | February 27, 2013 | 7:36 AM EST

On her radio show Monday, liberal host Randi Rhodes had an extended rant against Republicans and their policy advice of tax reductions for job creators.

“I mean, we're going crazy with this thing about corporations are more important than humans. Corporations more important than educating a kid. Corporations are more important than border security. Corporations are more important than, you know, flying safely. Really?” No, not really.  Then she complained the Republicans are “meth heads”:

By Jack Coleman | February 26, 2013 | 5:50 PM EST

Ed Schultz's radio show is long overdue for a laugh track, seeing how the hilarity just keeps coming.

Fresh on the heels of his delusional claim that a tax hike isn't actually a tax hike, Schultz on his radio show yesterday insisted that sequestration due to start March 1 will gut federal spending by "damn near a third" when in fact the impact is around ... 2 percent. (audio clip after page break)

By Matt Vespa | February 25, 2013 | 6:30 PM EST

Faux conservative David Brooks of the New York Times used his Friday appearance with Mark Shields on the PBS NewsHour to bash Republicans over sequestration, comparing GOP tactics in dealing with spending to a trite circus act.  Either Mr. Brooks forgot that sequestration was the president’s idea or doesn't care about facts getting in the way of cozying up to his liberal media buddies.  Even liberal Democratic Sen. Max Baucus (Montana) admitted to that, and it’s explicitly mentioned that sequestration was the White House’s idea in Bob Woodward’s new book about the 2011 debt ceiling fiasco.  

Shields piggybacked off of Brooks’ remarks, and said that the GOP’s fallback position is blaming the president, as if Obama is blameless in this dismal situation.

By Jack Coleman | February 25, 2013 | 4:11 PM EST

Somewhere the ghost of George Orwell groans in recognition.

Remember during last year's campaign how President Obama harped on "millionaires and billionaires" not paying what they should in taxes? For the sake of fairness, Obama insisted, tax rates signed into law by George W. Bush a decade ago should increase on the wealthy while the remaining "98 percent" of taxpayers, those earning less than $250,000 annually, should not see their taxes go up. (audio clip after page break)

By Jack Coleman | February 21, 2013 | 4:05 PM EST

Hey, did you know that Ed Schultz used to work as a TV meteorologist? They finally let him go after one too many references to racist cloud patterns.

Yes, I'm kidding, but it's not hard to envision this actually happening. When it comes to gratuitous references to race, Schultz is unrivaled -- except for all those other liberals inclined to do likewise. (audio clips after page break)

By Jack Coleman | February 18, 2013 | 6:30 PM EST

Ed Schultz seems chagrined that he rarely appears on the Sunday talk shows. Naturally, Republicans are to blame, at least as far as Schultz is concerned.

But buried inside this rant on his radio show Friday is what is likely the actual reason you seldom see Schultz on Sunday mornings. (audio clip after page break)

By Matthew Balan | February 15, 2013 | 6:56 PM EST

On Friday's Morning Edition, NPR's Cheryl Corley stacked her report on President Obama's gun control push full of left-of-center talking heads. But the one who stood out was Father Michael Pfleger, whom she merely identified as a "social activist". Corley ignored his controversial background, which includes a 2008 defense of Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Obama's former radical pastor, and threatening to "snuff out" a Chicago gun store owner in 2007.

The correspondent also failed to point out the liberal affiliations of two other "activists" who are on the faculty at University of Chicago: a political science professor with an interest in "lesbian and gay politics" and a law professor who is also a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

By Jack Coleman | February 14, 2013 | 9:00 AM EST

That's right -- not just Nixon ... Nixon and Bush. Can vilification from the left get much worse than that?

Cornel West continues to demonstrate why parents might want to think better of sending their children to Princeton, where West purportedly teaches when he isn't gushing over hip-hop and engaging in arcane rants over the airwaves. (audio clips after page break)

By Jack Coleman | February 12, 2013 | 4:10 PM EST

Turns out rape is a laughing matter, providing you're a liberal.

In her ongoing desperate efforts to remain oh so edgy, left-wing radio host Stephanie Miller tried to extract humor from a subject one would think remains decidedly unfunny -- rape. (audio clip after page break)

By Matthew Balan | February 8, 2013 | 7:46 PM EST

Left-wing talker Stephanie Miller made an eyebrow-raising attack on Michelle Malkin on Thursday. Just before playing a clip of Malkin from Fox News Channel's Hannity program on her radio program, Miller snarked, "Let's unpack this rice ball of health care nonsense from Michelle Malkin." This line could leave one with the impression that it was a racially-tinged insult of the conservative commentator [audio below the jump].

Miller's sidekicks Chris Lavoie and Jim Ward joined in the verbal assault on Malkin with sophomoric jabs about her digestive tract:

By Matthew Balan | February 7, 2013 | 6:31 PM EST

NPR's Ari Shapiro did little to conceal his slant towards same-sex "marriage" on Thursday's Morning Edition, as he reported on the Defense Department granting limited benefits to the same-sex partners of members of the military. Shapiro hyped that supposedly, "as a political move, the Pentagon's action is barely controversial."

The openly-homosexual correspondent later asserted that "it's hard to tell whether President Obama's pro-gay positions are helping to create this wave [of support for homosexuals in the military], or just letting him surf it." He also lined up three left-leaning talking heads during his report, versus only one social conservative pundit.

By Tom Blumer | February 7, 2013 | 10:44 AM EST

A Wednesday report by Keith Laing at the Hill failed to point out a quite obvious contradiction during departing Transportation Secretary LaHood's appearance on NPR's Diane Rehm show.

From all appearances, based on the video available at her site, Rehm, once LaHood launched into a predictable rant about how our transportation infrastructure is in serious disrepair, didn't ask -- and should have asked -- why the hundreds of billions of dollars spent on the stimulus plan accompanied by those ubiquitous Recovery Act promotional signs seen at road construction projects didn't stabilize things two or three years ago. Excerpts from Laing's lackluster effort follow the jump (bolds are mine):