Radio

By Jack Coleman | March 3, 2015 | 7:34 PM EST

A genuine leader spoke in Washington today, Rush Limbaugh told his radio listeners, and we've waited years to hear one.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's long-anticipated speech before a joint session of Congress on the peril posed to Israel -- and the world -- if the Islamist theocrats in Tehran succeed in acquiring nuclear weapons ended shortly before Limbaugh's show began.

 

By Jack Coleman | February 28, 2015 | 9:30 PM EST

Who would have thought the reaction from the left to newly-imposed "net neutrality" regulations would provide such entertainment value in the form of amusing inanities?

On his radio show Friday, former Crossfire host Bill Press and his guest, Julian Hattem, technology reporter for The Hill, provided a helpful roadmap for liberals', uh, thoughts on the issue.

By Tim Graham | February 26, 2015 | 10:12 AM EST

Elizabeth Jensen, hired by NPR as their new Ombudsman, picked up a question from NewsBusters on how NPR host Diane Rehm can do fundraisers for assisted-suicide lobbying group “Compassion & Choices.”

Jensen says she shouldn’t do this, that it’s a “step too far,” noting that NewsBusters picked up on the ethical issue.

By Jack Coleman | February 20, 2015 | 8:53 PM EST

Just when you thought what emanates from the White House on defeating the jihad could not get more absurd, Rush Limbaugh provides much-needed historical context.

This week brought both a three-day conference on "Countering Violent Extremism" (that'll show 'em!) and an op-ed along the same lines from President Obama that was published in the Los Angeles Times.

By Jack Coleman | February 17, 2015 | 11:33 AM EST

His instincts told him to be wary. Turns out that Rush Limbaugh's suspicions were well-founded.

On his radio broadcast Monday, the day after Saturday Night Live's 40th anniversary special on NBC, Limbaugh said SNL executive producer Lorne Michaels invited him on the show in the 1990s for a specific role -- to play Santa Claus.

By Jeffrey Lord | February 14, 2015 | 9:18 AM EST

Here’s a question. What is the difference between Brian Williams and Rush Limbaugh? What is the dog that isn’t barking?

Answer? The audience. There is no sudden groundswell of outraged NBC Nightly News viewers rallying to the support of the suspended anchor, angrily demanding he be restored to his job. On the contrary, when Rush Limbaugh ran into trouble in the Sandra Fluke episode and a handful of sponsors left -- under pressure of manufactured outrage from liberal interest groups -- Rush’s audience rallied on the spot.

By Jack Coleman | February 11, 2015 | 7:09 PM EST

A seismic shakeup in media yesterday with NBC News announcing a six-month suspension without pay for serial fabulist Brian Williams, while Comedy Central's Jon Stewart revealed he's leaving The Daily Show at the end of this season.

The two departures are indirectly connected, Rush Limbaugh told radio listeners today, and bolster his long-held belief that "NBC is not a news organization any more."
 

By Jack Coleman | February 9, 2015 | 10:14 PM EST

Hollywood may eventually make a movie about Brian Williams and his various adventures as a journalist, fictional and otherwise. Then again, Hollywood already has, as Rush Limbaugh pointed out on his radio show today.

Nearly three decades before troubles for the NBC anchor came to a head, the 1987 film Broadcast News was eerily prophetic in depicting "the Brian Williams story," Limbaugh told his listeners, while urging them to dust off the flick to see for themselves.

By Jack Coleman | February 7, 2015 | 5:44 PM EST

The question that came to mind while listening to President Obama's remarks at the National Prayer Breakfast -- where have I heard this before? Conservative columnist and author Charles Krauthammer provided a helpful reminder when he appeared on Hugh Hewitt's radio show yesterday.

For Obama to compared the current-day atrocities committed by radical Muslims on a daily basis around the world with the crimes of people centuries ago in the name of Christianity is simultaneously "banal" and "repulsive," Krauthammer told Hewitt, and what you'd expect to hear in a specific setting -- and from people of a certain age.

By Tom Blumer | February 4, 2015 | 11:45 PM EST

Radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh believes that because the center-right media and blogosphere pushed back against the vaccine vendetta campaign against Republicans and conservatives, the establishment press is sharply backing away from trying to capitalize on it, especially because both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have been shown to have played to the anti-vaxxer crowd during the 2008 Democratic presidential primary campaign.

Additionally, the New York Times, which smelled blood and ran a hit piece ("Measles Outbreak Proves Delicate Issue to G.O.P. Field") on Page A1 in its Tuesday print edition, had to issue a major three-point correction to it the very next day. That correction to the story by reporters Jeremy Peters and Richard Pérez-Peña, and Rush's reaction to it, follow the jump (bolds are mine throughout this post; paragraph breaks added by me):

By Jack Coleman | January 29, 2015 | 10:20 AM EST

You'll be hearing a lot about Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker as he mulls a potential run for the  presidency, then a heckuva lot more if he decides in the affirmative.

Much of the venting from the left about Walker will be outright falsehoods, such as this deceitful claim by liberal radio host Stephanie Miller on her program Tuesday. Miller, ranked number 22 among radio talk hosts in 2014 (right after Alan Colmes) by trade publication Talkers Magazine, is perhaps better known as the youngest daughter of the late William E. Miller, Barry Goldwater's running mate in the '64 campaign.

By Jack Coleman | January 26, 2015 | 8:35 PM EST

A tidal-wave election that Republicans rode to victory in 2014 and the roaring success of American Sniper, a film that many liberals loathe -- yes, they're related, Rush Limbaugh pointed out to his radio listeners today.

Bad enough for Democrats to suffer epic losses in the midterms, but when their power and influence are on the wane in Hollywood too -- that's a problem.