NPR

By Jeffrey Meyer | March 20, 2014 | 10:15 AM EDT

President Obama filled out his annual bracket for the NCAA Tournament and NPR’s All Things Considered predictably fawned over the “annual ritual” in which “President Obama” turned sports analyst today.” The online piece ha a similar cheerleading theme which proclaimed that “In ACA March Madness, Obama's Bracket Is Just A Role Player.”

On Wednesday March 19, NPR’s Audie Cornish gushed at how “It's not just the health of the Michigan State players on the president's mind. The White House is using this as part of its own full-court press. As NPR's Scott Horsley reports, their goal is to boost enrollment in the government's health insurance exchanges.” [Click here for audio.]

By Katie Yoder | March 17, 2014 | 4:38 PM EDT

OK, try to follow this: It’s St. Patrick’s Day. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. There’s a silly old saying about “the luck of the Irish.” “Getting lucky” is a term for having sex. So of course NPR had a “Get Lucky” promotion featuring R&B songs about sex. How else would you logically celebrate St. Patrick’s day? 

Government-funded National Public Radio (NPR) touted, “Get Lucky On St. Patrick's Day With These 25 R&B Songs.” The NPR staff introduced the piece, advertising, “Get ready for St. Patrick's Day with these 25 lucky love songs from NPR R&B.”

By Tim Graham | March 16, 2014 | 8:24 PM EDT

NPR prides itself on being globally sophisticated. So why on Earth would one of its correspondents ask “Which Place Is More Sexist, The Middle East Or Latin America?”

On NPR's "Parallels" blog, Lourdes Garcia-Navarro suggested Brazil is just as oppressive for women as Egypt or Iraq, in a different way. She concluded: “Activists often target the Middle East for its policies towards women. But as living in Brazil has taught me, for women, even having all the freedom in the world can be its own cage.”

By P.J. Gladnick | March 11, 2014 | 11:31 AM EDT

What a "coincidence!"

While the Senate Democrats are currently engaged in a Global Warming (now conveniently called "Climate Change") all nighter publicity stunt whose real purpose even  a Washinton Post reporter claimed was to raise desperately needed campaign cash, the usual suspects in the media are suddenly reporting about this mostly forgotten topic. Among these media outlets, perhaps the most comedically entertaining report came from National Public Radio station WBUR in Boston which conducted a bizarre survey of computerized voice shoutouts to somehow determine how much the sea level has risen in South Florida. The transcript is below the jump but you must listen to the computer voice survey to fully savor the hilariously surreal nature of this report.

By Tim Graham | March 10, 2014 | 9:45 PM EDT

Leftists and libertarians who join them in their “national security state” rhetoric love Edward Snowden for leaking thousands of classified documents to leftist journalist Glenn Greenwald and to The Washington Post, exposing and compromising U.S. surveillance programs. 

On Monday night, the public radio show “The World” – distributed to NPR stations across America by Minneapolis-based Public Radio International – oozed online that Snowden was “bigger than a rock star” in his appearance at an ACLU event at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas. That same line was announced by anchorman Marco Werman:

By Matthew Balan | March 3, 2014 | 7:12 PM EST

NPR's Lauren Frayer repeatedly emphasized the conservative ideology of the ruling party of Spain on Thursday's Morning Edition, as she reported on proposed legislation there that would be, in her words, "one of the toughest abortion laws in Europe – a near-total ban, except in cases of rape or threats to the mother's health." However, she didn't point out the left-of-center political affiliation of opponents of the proposal.

Frayer noted how "topless women" shouted "abortion is sacred...surrounding a Catholic cardinal on his way into church a couple weeks ago," but failed identify that these protesters were from Femen, the radical feminist group that got its start in Ukraine by cutting down a memorial cross to victims of Soviet communism. The correspondent also played up how the party that proposed the pro-life law is "moving to the righttrying to keep members from defecting to a new far-right political party, similar to the Tea Party in the U.S."

By Tom Blumer | March 3, 2014 | 10:38 AM EST

In December, NPR, the New York Times, National Journal, and other establishment press platforms gave the Republican National Committee grief over the following tweet: "Today we remember Rosa Parks' bold stand and her role in ending racism." The tweet erronseously shortened the following sentence from a longer GOP statement: "“We remember and honor Rosa Parks today for the role she played in fighting racism and ending segregation." Juliet Lapidos at the Times noted that the tweet was corrected in 3-1/2 hours, and seemed to lament that it took so long.

On Friday, "the official Twitter account of the Democratic Party" tweeted the following in support of increasing the federally mandated minimum wage (HT Patterico):

By Tim Graham | March 1, 2014 | 6:11 PM EST

NPR celebrates political anniversaries – when it likes them. They celebrated the one-year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, when when it had already faded away. This week, NPR aired five stories discussing the fourth anniversary of Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative to get kids to eat better and exercise.

But there was no story on the fifth anniversary of the Tea Party. The closest thing was a Mara Liasson analysis on Thursday of how the Senate races look tough for Democrats this fall – if the Republicans can keep the Tea Party extremists at bay:

By Tim Graham | February 27, 2014 | 10:53 PM EST

There are few things that might please liberal journalists more than finding that elusive voter that proves a dearly held theory: anti-Obama voters really hate black people. It’s all about his race, not his policies.

NPR hit that jackpot on Tuesday’s Morning Edition in a seven-minute story on Sen. Mary Landrieu (D) seeking re-election in Louisiana. In seven minutes, NPR’s Ailsa Chang never even whispered the name of Landrieu’s expected Republican opponent, Rep. Bill Cassidy (or his challenger, state Sen. Paul Hollis). The latest poll found Cassidy in the lead. But Chang found a racist sitting under an oak tree in Galliano, Louisiana, in Cajun territory:

By Tim Graham | February 24, 2014 | 6:55 AM EST

NPR media reporter David Folkenflik was given the chance to promote his book “Murdoch’s World” in an interview for the latest edition of The Quill, the magazine of the Society of Professional Journalists. He tried the usual line that Rupert Murdoch deserved a whole book on his scandals because he’s so “unique.” (Read: somewhat conservative tycoon in a liberal media.)

Folkenflik said he was on a Fox News “blacklist,” and not for the first time. Then he made sure he said he had “a lot of respect” for the Wall Street Journal, unlike Fox:

By Tim Graham | February 14, 2014 | 8:24 AM EST

NPR is branding itself for Valentine's Day with social-media Valentine's Day messages. After some seriously lame puns with names of NPR personalities, the most liberal-friendly one states "Make my world more just, verdant, and peaceful."

For NPR regulars, this is a wisecrack about the "underwriting announcement" of the leftist John D. and Catherine T. McArthur Foundation, where the announcer says on a very regular basis they are "committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world" at macfound.org.

By Matthew Balan | February 13, 2014 | 3:03 PM EST

NPR's Richard Knox played up a Pennsylvania judge's dismissal of a homicide case involving admitted euthanasia as "a sign that attitudes about end-of-life decisions are changing, whatever most statutes say," in a Wednesday item for the public radio network's health news blog. Knox euphemistically described the contoversial practice, as he asserted that "the [judge's] decision is the latest in a series of recent developments signaling a reluctance of courts and state legislatures to criminalize medical care that may hasten death."

The correspondent also slanted towards pro-euthanasia groups by including two quotes from a representative of an "advocacy group," while providing none from pro-life opponents.