By Tim Graham | October 6, 2015 | 10:54 AM EDT

As the Supreme Court term begins, NPR court correspondent Nina Totenberg played dumb on Monday’s Morning Edition, much like Adam Liptak at The New York Times. Why would conservatives dislike “consistently conservative” chief justice John Roberts?

Desperately employing rickety rationales twice to uphold Obamacare somehow doesn’t undermine “consistency.” Totenberg forgot Roberts being hailed by Time magazine in 2012 as similar to  Beethoven, Willie Mays, and King Solomon: “Not since King Solomon offered to split the baby has a judge engineered a slicker solution to a bitterly divisive dispute.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 5, 2015 | 11:57 AM EDT

During appearances on NPR’s All Things Considered and PBS NewsHour on Friday, the Washington Post’s E.J. Dionne and the New York Times’ David Brooks eagerly touted President Obama’s blatant decision to “politicize” the Oregon school shooting to push gun control. 

By Randy Hall | September 30, 2015 | 8:34 PM EDT

In an effort to resolve the ongoing debate about whether or not to fly the Confederate flag, Studio 30 -- a weekly public radio program -- commissioned 70kft, a Texas-based design firm, to come up with a new flag to represent "the modern South."

According to an article by John Hammontree – who writes features and opinion pieces for the Alabama website, the result of the project was a banner that combines the tried and true colors of red and blue diagonal stripes -- but no stars -- on a white background that represents “different people, with unique backgrounds, experiences and values. They are equal to each other, but different in color.

By Tim Graham | September 27, 2015 | 7:21 AM EDT

On Saturday, NPR’s Weekend Edition celebrated atheist author Philip Pullman and the His Dark Materials trilogy he wrote for middle-schoolers, a sort of anti-Narnia series. Anchor Scott Simon celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first book in this trilogy and interviewed Pullman as he sat a BBC studio in Oxford, hinting they have "maybe the mark of real excellence."

By Tom Blumer | September 23, 2015 | 10:46 PM EDT

It would appear that Hillary Clinton's act is wearing thin even among the people at that liberal bastion known as NPR.

Tuesday afternoon, the headline at an NPR story about Mrs. Clinton's sudden decision to publicly announce her opposition to the Keystone XL Pipeline project indicated that her announcement was deliberately timed to coincide with Pope Francis's visit to the United States (HT Stephen Kruiser at PJ Media):

By Tim Graham | September 17, 2015 | 10:03 PM EDT

NPR generously donated an hour-long interview on Wednesday on The Diane Rehm Show to former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley. (Rehm also gave an hour to former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb in July.) Both Democrats are in Pataki territory in the polls for the Democratic presidential nomination.

The strangest part came when Rehm turned to the Republican desire to discontinue federal funding of Planned Parenthood, the nation’s leading abortion provider. Rehm bizarrely made it sound like there was just one Center for Medical Progress video, and one “individual” recorded discussing selling baby body parts. O’Malley denied ever seeing “that video.”

By Matthew Balan | September 10, 2015 | 4:47 PM EDT

NPR's Jennifer Ludden's liberal bias was clear on Wednesday's All Things Considered, as she covered a congressional hearing on abortion from earlier in the day. The House Judiciary Committee scheduled the hearing in the wake of the Center for Medical Progress's release of hidden camera videos on the sale of organs and tissues from abortion babies. Ludden pointed out how "Planned Parenthood denies any wrongdoing," and asserted that "the videos show no evidence of it."

By Tim Graham | August 23, 2015 | 7:52 AM EDT

The police-bashing community organizers known as the “Black Lives Matter” movement have a healthy contingent of completely biased black journalist/publicists. Gene Demby, brought into National Public Radio to agitate in the racial “Code Switch” project, wrote a 3,900-word essay for the NPR website and appeared on Friday’s Morning Edition to discuss how depressing it is to travel from cop victim to cop victim.

Anchor Steve Inskeep set Demby up to explain the toll of "How Black Reporters Report On Black Death" and why objectivity was a dishonest white construct on this taxpayer-funded network:

By Tim Graham | August 13, 2015 | 2:11 PM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor interviewed President Obama about just two topics: the Iran deal and race relations. On Wednesday’s morning show, Inskeep began with a question from the radical left – from black professor and MSNBC host Michael Eric Dyson – and then just prompted the president instead of really asking questions. 

Dyson wrote a column for The New York Times going after the usual allegedly racist suspects: “The right wing had made furious efforts to demonize him as a man unworthy of assuming the mantle of national leadership. The assaults from political figures who portrayed him as a cipher, or a monkey or, later, the police officers who cracked jokes at his expense, proved the toxic atmosphere.” That’s not the section Inskeep quoted. 

By Tim Graham | August 12, 2015 | 10:07 PM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep was granted another interview with President Obama just before he left on another Martha’s Vineyard vacation, and the first story aired on Tuesday's Morning Edition, with a second on Tuesday night’s All Things Considered. The subject was limited to the Iran deal.

Despite the strange notion held by many liberals that NPR is a voice for civility in media and politics, Inskeep failed to ask the president about his controversial recent remarks in a speech at American University that “It’s those hardliners chanting ‘Death to America’ who have been most opposed to the deal. They're making common cause with the Republican Caucus.”

By Ken Shepherd | August 12, 2015 | 9:15 PM EDT

On the August 10 edition of National Public Radio (NPR) Boston affiliate WBUR's Here & Now program, host Robin Young made reference to pro-life Republicans as "anti-choice." The reference, which violates NPR's own style manual, came in the midst of a discussion with Princeton University professor Julian Zelizer about Republican presidential candidates' plans to roll back various policy initiatives of the Obama era.

By Matthew Balan | July 22, 2015 | 3:11 PM EDT

As of Wednesday morning, NPR's morning and evening newscasts have yet to cover the second undercover video of a Planned Parenthood executive revealing how the organization varies its abortion procedures in order to preserve the organs of unborn babies for medical research. Instead, Tuesday's All Things Considered spotlighted a March 2014 incident where the adult son of a pro-life activist vandalized an abortionist's office in rural Montana.