By Tom Blumer | October 25, 2016 | 10:16 PM EDT

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, or Hillary the Inevitable if you're in the establishment press and ignoring three credible polls showing her either very slightly trailing or very slightly ahead of Donald Trump, appears not to be achieving the high degree of support or turnout that Barack Obama did among black voters in 2008 and 2012.

On Sunday, Hillary Campaign Manager Robby Mook dodged a question from Jake Tapper on CNN's State of the Union about indications that black turnout for the former Secretary of State in North Carolina during early voting has not been strong. Meanwhile, a black Trump supporter, who the press seems to believe can easily be turned into an object of ridicule, continues to run circles around them in interviews.

By Tim Graham | October 12, 2016 | 2:11 PM EDT

On Tuesday’s Morning Edition on National Public Radio, they turned to a liberal media eminence to explain just how easily Hillary Clinton is winning this election. Washington Post assistant managing editor David Maraniss was just an “Author” in their online headline. Armed with this authority, Maraniss proceeded to talk exactly like a hyperbolic MSNBC surrogate for the Clintons, claiming that Trump’s jail quip in the second debate proved Trump was “against everying about American democracy” and represented the view of a “tin-pot dictatorship in which politicians jail the other side.”

By Jack Coleman | October 9, 2016 | 10:49 AM EDT

They try, they really do, but those earnest sorts at state-run media known as National Public Radio can't hide their true colors.

This is especially true when the media outlet's reporters, editors and assorted hangers-on talk among themselves, as on the NPR Politics podcast.

By Matthew Balan | October 6, 2016 | 9:19 PM EDT

NPR's Morning Edition on Thursday donated four minutes of air time to pro-abortion group EMILY's List, and helped it promote its ad blitz to elect Hillary Clinton and other left-wing Democrats. Renee Montagne played a clip from one of the organization's ads, and gave its president, Stephanie Schriock, a platform to hype Mrs. Clinton as a "a champion for women and families."

By Matthew Balan | October 3, 2016 | 3:58 PM EDT

On NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday, John Burnett hyped the objections of a few residents of Gonzales, Texas to gun rights backers' use of the town's slogan from the Texas Revolution. Burnett played up how "some Gonzalians are taken aback to see that Second Amendment activists have appropriated 'Come and Take It,' and substituted an assault rifle for their hallowed cannon." However, he failed to explain that the slogan has its roots in the reply of a king from ancient Greece, who rebuked an enemy's demand to disarm.

By Scott Whitlock | September 13, 2016 | 5:34 PM EDT

On the 20th anniversary of Tupac Shakur’s death, NPR touted the rapper, who was gunned down in a drive-by shooting, for his “pro-feminist,” “pro-choice” music. Morning Edition’s Renee Montagne talked to journalist Kevin Powell about Tupac. Powell recommended Keep Ya Head Up, praising, “Here's a song that is really an ode to women. It's a pro-feminist song. He talks about being pro-choice in the song. He talks about being anti-street harassment in the song.” 

By Tim Graham | September 13, 2016 | 6:58 AM EDT

Usually, our “objective” media thrives on any internal fighting and panic among Republicans, and downplays or hides it on the Democratic side. NPR analyst Cokie Roberts violated that informal policy on Monday’s Morning Edition, openly suggesting Democrats were talking about replacing Hillary Clinton on the ticket over her health problems.

By Tim Graham | September 3, 2016 | 11:01 PM EDT

On the Friday “Week in Politics” segment on NPR’s All Things Considered, liberal columnist E.J.  Dionne and “conservative” columnist David Brooks were as usual in agreement. Anchor Ari Shapiro asked about the FBI document-dump on their interview with Hillary about her private e-mail server. Dionne regurgitated the Hillary spin that these notes only underlined why FBI director James Comey recommended against indicting her. Then Brooks agreed, and compared her to a small poetry magazine.

By Sam Dorman | August 31, 2016 | 1:55 PM EDT

The Washington Post’s Wonkblog presented another way for liberals to hate on masculinity by connecting masculinity to a liberal cause du jour: climate change. “Your manliness could be hurting the planet,” reporter Danielle Paquette wrote.

By Tim Graham | August 25, 2016 | 9:05 PM EDT

“It's important to say right up front that this isn't a story about pedophile priests,” began the NPR reporter on Wednesday a story with the online headline “Catholic Church Groups Fight Bills To Revive Old Sex Abuse Cases.”

Some legislators want to put in a "grace period" for new sex-abuse lawsuits outside the statute of limitations. The people who call their show All Things Considered didn’t consider this: Can we open the statute of limitations on rape allegations for Juanita Broaddrick to sue Bill Clinton? Would that seem fair?

By Tim Graham | August 19, 2016 | 9:32 PM EDT

NPR loves to imagine itself as an oasis of civility compared to nasty commercial talk radio. NPR host Diane Rehm has written haughty op-eds about how Rush Limbaugh et al are a blight on the radio. But wondering if Donald Trump is mentally ill? Apparently, that's civil and educational.

Rehm launched an hour-long discussion of Trump's dysfunctional mental state based on a Tuesday New York Times article about psychologists breaking the "Goldwater Rule" and diagnosing a dangerous presidential aspirant as nuts

By Mira Ebersole | August 19, 2016 | 3:36 PM EDT

“Should We Be Having Kids In The Age of Climate Change?” That was the audacious question NPR’s website and “All Things Considered” radio show asked on Aug. 18, as it promoted a college professor’s “radical” proposal that people need to have fewer children because of the “prospect of climate catastrophe.”