By Tim Graham | May 14, 2016 | 11:31 PM EDT

Following the lead of The New York Times, NPR on Saturday touted a new American trend – “climate change refugees,” people being subsidized by the federal government to move away from their lives on the coast.

By Tim Graham | May 14, 2016 | 3:49 PM EDT

On Wednesday morning, NPR’s Morning Edition bowed deeply to the late “hippie dippie” comedian George Carlin. The man who mocked everyone else in an increasingly sour, misanthropic way was revered as a figure of “eternal respect.”

The occasion was Carlin’s egotistically organized archives of his career being donated to a new National Comedy Center. NPR reporter Elizabeth Blair never found a note of controversy in his history, just an echo of reverence:

By Tim Graham | May 8, 2016 | 7:57 PM EDT

NPR announced on Saturday night that London elected “the first Muslim mayor of a major Western capital city.”  His name is Sadiq Khan, the son of Pakistani immigrants, and he is now one of the most powerful members of the Labour Party.

On Wednesday night’s All Things Considered, NPR brought London Evening Standard city hall editor Pippa Crerar to gush all over the prospect of Khan’s election as a globally “huge message” and cooing over Khan as a  “become...for freedom and tolerance.” Even as his opponents raised the issue of his connections to radical Islam.

By Tim Graham | May 6, 2016 | 6:56 AM EDT

How left-wing is NPR?  On Monday, it unspooled this opener: “It will be Indiana's turn tomorrow to vote in the presidential primaries, and that gives us the opportunity to remember one of the state's most famous politicians.”

Dan Quayle? Birch Bayh? President Benjamin Harrison? Nope. “Eugene V. Debs ran for president as a Socialist five times in the early 1900s, once in 1920 from prison.” The online headline was “Eugene V. Debs Museum Explores History Of American Socialism.”

By Tim Graham | May 3, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

In 2013, NPR host Rachel Martin spent eight minutes of taxpayer-subsidized air time on the last Sunday before Christmas promoting the atheist band Bad Religion wrecking Christmas songs and found no time to question if it offended.

NPR devoted almost 12 minutes to promoting atheist actor/writer Ricky Gervais on the morning of May 1.  Weekend Edition Sunday anchor Rachel Martin found a piety worth defending. She hounded Gervais about being insensitive to Bruce “Caitlyn” Jenner and the “trans community.” Gervais surely raised some liberal eyebrows for testily responding “I hope we’re all grown-ups” when it comes to Jenner humor.

By Brad Wilmouth | April 21, 2016 | 9:33 PM EDT

As former ABC This Week co-anchor Cokie Roberts appeared as a guest on Thursday's Morning Joe on MSNBC, she expressed agreement as liberal host Mika Brzezinski declared that GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz "seems like a terrible choice" for Republicans to support to stop Donald Trump from winning. Brzezinski proclaimed: "I'm sure it is a little bit of, for me, my world view, ideology, but it just seems like Ted Cruz seems like a terrible choice to try and use -- am I wrong? Help me out with some objectivity."

By Tim Graham | April 10, 2016 | 8:13 AM EDT

Since National Public Radio is a taxpayer-funded liberal sandbox, you can find examples nearly  every day of NPR conducting a conversation with its liberal audience on all the liberal obsessions of the moment, like the new political-correctness theme of “cultural appropriation,” like being mad at Justin Bieber for wearing dreadlocks, because that’s a black thing.

This week, NPR asked “When Is It OK To Profit From Cooking Other Cultures' Food?” In other words, is it okay for an Indian-American to run a pizza joint, or an Italian to run an Indian restaurant? If you're a white guy cooking Mexican food, it is racist or "neocolonialist"? Apparently, to the Left, you should “stick to your own kind” when selling food.

By Geoffrey Dickens | April 4, 2016 | 8:58 AM EDT

In the April 4 edition of Notable Quotables the liberal media: Barack Obama’s trip to Cuba inspires journalists to sing communism’s praises and worry about capitalism ruining that country’s “charm.” Meanwhile, anchors at PBS and CBS slam Ted Cruz for his “ugly” anti-terrorism policies and a former New York Times editor decries sexist persecution of “fundamentally honest” Hillary Clinton. 

By Tom Blumer | March 31, 2016 | 2:09 PM EDT

Wednesday morning, Tim Graham at NewsBusters observed how pseudo-conservative David Brooks, who is no fan of Donald Trump, gave the current GOP frontrunner credit for having "destroyed a dying husk" of "obsolete Reagan ideology" in the Republican Party.

That's fascinating stuff, given the catch of the day by Instapundit's Ed Driscoll. You see, 12 years ago, Brooks gave Reagan credit for having transformed the party and conservatism "from a past- and loss-oriented movement to a future- and possibility-oriented one." In other words, even Dense David recognized at the time that Reagan's positive tone and belief in American exceptionalism — a term which the left, up to and including President Obama, has tried to ridicule out of existence — were the foundation for how Reagan, in Brooks's words, "embraced America as a revolutionary force."

By Matthew Balan | March 30, 2016 | 5:34 PM EDT

NPR's Scott Horsley acted as a stenographer for President Obama on Tuesday's Morning Edition, as he reported on the Democrat's Monday slam of the news media. Horsley played up how the President "spoke as a politician who's been on the receiving end of tough questions; but also as a somewhat cranky news consumer who thinks too many reporters are falling down on the job." The correspondent also turned to a talking head who backed up Obama's criticism of the press.

By Tim Graham | March 30, 2016 | 8:14 AM EDT

David Brooks, the fake conservative half of public broadcasting on Friday – the one day they pretend to let conservatives on the taxpayer-funded airwaves – forecast on Friday's All Things Considered on NPR that Donald Trump has done one positive thing – destroyed the “dying husk” of obsolete Reaganism in the Republican Party. Naturally, his liberal radio counterpart E.J. Dionne agreed, hoping for a more liberal, domesticated GOP.

By Mark Finkelstein | March 30, 2016 | 7:41 AM EDT

MSNBC might have to build a deeper tank . . . so Cokie Roberts can dive into it for Hillary. On today's Morning Joe, Roberts of NPR complained about the resources the FBI is devoting to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's misuse of email.  Carped Cokie: "Don't they have other problems? There's no crime in the country they should be worrying about?"

Roberts' timing could hardly have been worse. Just moments before, Joe Scarborough pointed out that last week it was revealed that 22 of the emails on Hillary's server "were so sensitive that the State Department said releasing them would cause grave danger to the United States national security." Not worth investigating, Cokie? Really?