NPR

By Curtis Houck | January 13, 2015 | 4:57 PM EST

In the Tuesday print edition of The New York Times, an article appeared on A11 about the “anti-Islam” and “anti-immigration rally in Germany” that took place in Dresden on Monday and, in addition to trashing their position, reporter Melissa Eddy failed to interview or quote any of the over 20,000 demonstrators. 

Over course of the 650 word plus article, Eddy instead included quotes from Germany’s justice minister, a spokesman for the city of Leipzig, Chancellor Angela Merkel, a European Parliament member from “the rightist Alternative for Germany party” and an excerpt of “a declaration” from the group organizing the protests.

By Randy Hall | January 12, 2015 | 7:22 PM EST

Not long after 12 cartoonists and editors were murdered at the Paris office of the Charlie Hebdo magazine last Wednesday, news outlets around the world faced a difficult dilemma: produce images of satirical cartoons of Mohammed from the weekly publication and face the possibility of being attacked by other terrorists; or play it safe by using other pictures instead.

One organization that wrestled with the problem was National Public Radio, which debated whether or not to post such illustrations on its website, according to Mark Memmott, the company's standards and practices editor.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | December 30, 2014 | 10:26 PM EST

In the fall of 2007, President Bush offered an interview on race relations to National Public Radio correspondent Juan Williams, but NPR declined the invitation. Ellen Weiss, the news boss at the time (who was deposed in the controversy after she fired Williams three years later), demanded that an NPR anchor do the interview. The Williams interview with the president aired on Fox News, and not on NPR.

That sense of feisty independence does not extend to President Obama. When he grants an interview to an NPR anchor, it has all the dramatic tension and hostility of a cappuccino klatch with the D.C. Young Democrats.

By Jeffrey Meyer | December 29, 2014 | 12:30 PM EST

President Obama sat down with Steve Inskeep, host of NPR’s Morning Edition, for an interview that aired on Monday, December 29 and was repeatedly tossed softball questions from the lefty reporter throughout their conversation. Inskeep began the discussion by asking President Obama “Since your party's defeat in the election, you have made two major executive actions — one on immigration, one on Cuba...Is there some way in which that election just passed has liberated you?” 

By Tim Graham | December 24, 2014 | 9:23 AM EST

The season of Christmas and Hanukkah is just another season for National Public Radio to describe religion as a negative force for judgmental people massaging their own ego by being self-righteous. On the December 19 TED Radio Hour -- a spinoff of the TED Talks enterprise -- host Guy Raz asked author Karen Armstrong about how divisive religion is.

By Tim Graham | December 8, 2014 | 2:04 PM EST

The Catholic Church’s Diocese of Brooklyn is marketing its Christmas celebrations to millennial “hipsters” with an ad campaign focusing on concepts like nightclubs and selfies. One shows a church door with the slogan “Everyone’s on the list,” in contrast to an exclusive nightclub. Another shows an attractive brunette in glasses taking a selfie with the slogan “It’s Never Just a  Selfie,” and behind the woman is an image of Jesus Christ.

This marketing campaign became grist for secular-progressive mockery on Saturday on National Public Radio. The host of their game show “”Wait! Wait! Don’t Tell Me” suggested Jesus couldn’t take the selfie with the young lady because “his hands were occupied.”

By Tim Graham | December 7, 2014 | 9:24 AM EST

Liberal reporters cannot believe conservatives see Jeb Bush as a Republican establishment figure, a moderate squish. Mark Levin calls him a “very good moderate Democrat.” In Politico magazine, NPR’s S.V. Date couldn’t believe it; neither could Adam C. Smith of the Tampa Bay Times.

Both journalists thought conservatives were just misunderstanding reality.

By Jeffrey Meyer | December 1, 2014 | 2:45 PM EST

On December 11, the continuing resolution currently funding the federal government will expire and that seemed like the perfect opportunity for the folks at National Public Radio to speculate about a possible GOP-caused government shutdown. Appearing on NPR’s Morning Edition on Monday, December 1, Steve Inskeep and Cokie Roberts went to great lengths discussing how the Republican Party could shut down the federal government. Even though Roberts conceded that a shutdown was unlikely, the NPR correspondent did her best to repeatedly play up how the GOP wants to “to keep the option open all the time.” 

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | November 22, 2014 | 7:58 AM EST

The liberal myth surrounding the hypercompetent Barack Obama faded long ago, but the liberal myth of “cultural icon” Jon Stewart is only getting stronger. Stewart’s tour of interviews for the new movie he directed, “Rosewater,” has created a parade of flatterers, sycophants, and every other synonym in the thesaurus for “obsequious.”

Roy Sekoff at The Huffington Post stands out by insisting the movie only polishes this walking statue: “In finding this format, in this form, you have become obviously a cultural icon, maybe one of the dominant figures in the political discourse.”

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 10:49 PM EST

After the 2012 campaign, liberal journalists swarmed around Republican Party chair Reince Priebus offering what was called an “autopsy” on every way Republicans failed, with a special emphasis on more outreach to minority voters. Democrats and their media enablers painted a picture of demographic doom for an aging white Republican base.

Two years later, Republicans made dramatic gains among minority voters. In House races across America, Republicans won 50 percent of the Asian vote to 49 percent for Democrats. Republicans won 38 percent of the Hispanic vote in House races. Gov. Sam Brownback drew 47 percent of Hispanics in Kansas, and Gov-elect Greg Abbott pulled in 44 percent of Hispanics in Texas.

By Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 12:02 PM EST

NPR and PBS have finally touched the Gruber brouhaha, but neither showed any enthusiasm for it. On Sunday morning’s Weekend Edition, anchor Rachel Martin and reporter Mara Liasson dismissed it in 59 seconds. 

On the PBS NewsHour Monday, anchor Judy Woodruff brought in two liberal journalists to discuss Gruber, but first Woodruff asked six questions about how open enrollment was going. 

By Tim Graham | November 16, 2014 | 8:18 AM EST

Pseudo-conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks -- appointed by both NPR and PBS to agree with liberals from the "Republican" side of the political divide on Friday-night "week in review" panels -- is back to bashing Ted Cruz, even though after the election, he admitted Republicans weren't too extreme to win all over the place.

Brooks was bashing Obama with the worst cudgel he could imagine: Mr. President, don't pull a "total Ted Cruz manuever" and force amnesty by executive order. He said the same thing on PBS.