By Tim Graham | August 23, 2015 | 7:52 AM EDT

The police-bashing community organizers known as the “Black Lives Matter” movement have a healthy contingent of completely biased black journalist/publicists. Gene Demby, brought into National Public Radio to agitate in the racial “Code Switch” project, wrote a 3,900-word essay for the NPR website and appeared on Friday’s Morning Edition to discuss how depressing it is to travel from cop victim to cop victim.

Anchor Steve Inskeep set Demby up to explain the toll of "How Black Reporters Report On Black Death" and why objectivity was a dishonest white construct on this taxpayer-funded network:

By Tim Graham | August 13, 2015 | 2:11 PM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor interviewed President Obama about just two topics: the Iran deal and race relations. On Wednesday’s morning show, Inskeep began with a question from the radical left – from black professor and MSNBC host Michael Eric Dyson – and then just prompted the president instead of really asking questions. 

Dyson wrote a column for The New York Times going after the usual allegedly racist suspects: “The right wing had made furious efforts to demonize him as a man unworthy of assuming the mantle of national leadership. The assaults from political figures who portrayed him as a cipher, or a monkey or, later, the police officers who cracked jokes at his expense, proved the toxic atmosphere.” That’s not the section Inskeep quoted. 

By Tim Graham | August 12, 2015 | 10:07 PM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep was granted another interview with President Obama just before he left on another Martha’s Vineyard vacation, and the first story aired on Tuesday's Morning Edition, with a second on Tuesday night’s All Things Considered. The subject was limited to the Iran deal.

Despite the strange notion held by many liberals that NPR is a voice for civility in media and politics, Inskeep failed to ask the president about his controversial recent remarks in a speech at American University that “It’s those hardliners chanting ‘Death to America’ who have been most opposed to the deal. They're making common cause with the Republican Caucus.”

By Ken Shepherd | August 12, 2015 | 9:15 PM EDT

On the August 10 edition of National Public Radio (NPR) Boston affiliate WBUR's Here & Now program, host Robin Young made reference to pro-life Republicans as "anti-choice." The reference, which violates NPR's own style manual, came in the midst of a discussion with Princeton University professor Julian Zelizer about Republican presidential candidates' plans to roll back various policy initiatives of the Obama era.

By Matthew Balan | July 22, 2015 | 3:11 PM EDT

As of Wednesday morning, NPR's morning and evening newscasts have yet to cover the second undercover video of a Planned Parenthood executive revealing how the organization varies its abortion procedures in order to preserve the organs of unborn babies for medical research. Instead, Tuesday's All Things Considered spotlighted a March 2014 incident where the adult son of a pro-life activist vandalized an abortionist's office in rural Montana.

By Sarah Stites | July 22, 2015 | 9:05 AM EDT

Good news, America! You no longer have to pay Garrison Keillor to sneer at you. After his 30-city “America the Beautiful” tour, the Prairie Home Companion radio host is retiring for good (and good riddance). His tour should have been called “America the Liberal.”

Keillor is a malicious parasite who spent his career soaking up federal funding through NPR while wrapping his off-the-shelf anti-American leftism in a cloying Midwestern folksiness.

So, if you’re not one of Keillor’s 4 million listeners worldwide, count yourself lucky, and enjoy these top five ridiculous quotes from the man himself.

By Tim Graham | July 12, 2015 | 8:59 AM EDT

National Public Radio is being hailed for its commitment to diversity in its latest promotion of anchors and producers. With NPR evening anchor Melissa Block departing, they promoted Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro to work alongside Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish on the nightly newscast All Things Considered. Michel Martin will take over hosting the show on weekends.

Cornish and Martin are black, and Shapiro is gay. “That leaves Siegel as the only straight white dude delivering the news on ATC,” explained Andrew Beaujon at Washingtonian magazine.

By Jeffrey Meyer | July 8, 2015 | 3:42 PM EDT

During Hillary Clinton’s first national interview on CNN Tuesday, the Democratic presidential candidate was pressed about her use of a private e-mail server during her time as Secretary of State, but both PBS and NPR ignored the topic during their post-interview coverage on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.

By Tim Graham | June 26, 2015 | 8:00 PM EDT

The latest in a long line of one-sided stories mocking the title of NPR’s evening newscast – All Things Considered – came in a Thursday night story on gay activism in Poland. “Homophobia” was apparently too ugly to deserve any air time.

NPR reporter Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson was in Poland to promote the “hope and change” on the Left, and only the Left. Activists compared the gay activists to the anti-communist stalwarts of Solidarity:

By Tom Blumer | June 24, 2015 | 10:56 PM EDT

The politically correct speech police are everywhere these days. Many members of the leftist establishment have taken it upon themselves to aid in their enforcement efforts. No one is safe — not even the person they want us to believe is destined to be the Democrats' 2016 presidential nominee.

Yesterday, at a Florissant, Missouri church only five miles from Ferguson, Hillary Clinton uttered the following words in succession: "All lives matter." NPR's Tamara Keith and Amita Kelly devoted much of their four-minute "Morning Edition" report on her appearance to what was described as a "3-Word Misstep."

By Curtis Houck | June 22, 2015 | 10:33 PM EDT

In their coverage on Monday night of the calls by South Carolina officials to remove the Confederate flag from the State Capitol’s grounds, the major broadcast networks failed to note the full context of the flag’s history in the Palmetto State and how it was a Democratic Governor who first hoisted it above the Capitol dome in 1962. Meanwhile, Fox News’s Special Report noted this fact during one of the show’s “All-Star Panel” segments with host Bret Baier reporting how a Republican was in office when the flag was taken down from the dome and moved to the Capitol’s grounds as a compromise in 1998. 

By Jeffrey Meyer | June 15, 2015 | 2:54 PM EDT

On Saturday, NPR’s Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me! brought on Kim Kardashian to play “Not my job” but the show’s liberal audience blasted NPR for inviting the reality TV star onto public radio and supposedly ruining their airwaves.