NPR

By Matthew Balan | May 29, 2015 | 5:42 PM EDT

Friday's Morning Edition on NPR did its best to try to promote the liberal cause of expanding Medicaid in Texas. Wade Goodwyn lined up six soundbites from pro-expansion talking heads, versus only two from former Texas Governor Rick Perry, an opponent. Goodwyn played up that "in hating the Affordable Care Act, the state is leaving on the table as much as a hundred billion dollars of federal money over ten years – money that would pay for health insurance for more than a million of its working poor."

By Curtis Houck | May 14, 2015 | 10:54 PM EDT

On the heels of the news Thursday that former Clinton aide and ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos gave a previously-undisclosed $75,000 to the Clinton Foundation, the “big three” of ABC, CBS, and NBC joined MSNBC in making no on-air mention of the newest scandal facing the foundation. As of Thursday night at 10:30 p.m. Eastern, the scandal was mentioned on ten different Fox News Channel (FNC) shows and only once on CNN, but not a single mention on MSNBC.

 

By Curtis Houck | May 12, 2015 | 11:20 PM EDT

On Tuesday, ABC’s World News Tonight and the CBS Evening News chose to ignore news that Senate Democrats voted to block debate on a series of trade measures pushed by President Barack Obama as part of a push to eventually approve the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal. NBC Nightly News did cover the story with a news brief by Lester Holt who billed the failed vote as “[a] major setback today for one of President Obama’s top economic priorities” that “was delivered by the President’s own party.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | May 4, 2015 | 11:57 AM EDT

On Saturday’s Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me!, NPR’s Peter Sagal mocked the presidential prospects of Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and joked that during the Democratic primary Hillary might play “for the middle by walking over during a debate and punching the hippie.” 

By Tim Graham | April 27, 2015 | 9:58 AM EDT

Former White House press secretary Dana Perino appeared on The Kelly File on Friday night to lament that she shared a touching story about President Bush visiting wounded soldiers in Washington with National Public Radio, but they edited out a family who was overjoyed to see the president, choosing to focus just on an angry mother who was mad at Bush. "Why are your children okay, but my son is here?"

By Tim Graham | April 19, 2015 | 6:11 PM EDT

Most Americans can see there is a vast difference between a time in America where racist mobs lynched innocent black men, and today. But NPR is full of liberals who like to engage in the slur that nothing has changed in American race relations. Now, apparently, the racist mobs are the police.

On Friday’s Morning Edition, NPR did a story on the revival of anti-lynching plays in the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Walter Scott.

By Tim Graham | April 17, 2015 | 11:30 AM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep interviewed presidential candidate Marco Rubio for Tuesday’s program,and like Jake Tapper on his CNN show Tuesday, threw hardballs at Rubio for being in the wrong side of the polls on gay marriage. (Recent polls are showing about 60 percent in favor, 35 percent opposed).

But Inskeep demonstrated a liberal swagger by suggesting social conservatives no longer had a leg to stand on:

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | April 7, 2015 | 11:04 PM EDT

The Old Media loathes the New Media as unreliable, and have no right to pass judgment. Increasingly they are prone to leap into news stories based on their own liberal networks of social media. Look no further than the new Indiana religious freedom law. They could not get enough of those angry tweets from Hillary Clinton and public-policy geniuses like Miley Cyrus.

Based on Twitter, they touted a "growing outrage" from coast to coast and obsessed over Indiana's "bigotry" for days. Conservative social media also reacted to the Hoosier contretemps forcefully in the opposite direction, but apparently it's too much to expect "objective" journalists to notice too much of that.

By Tim Graham | March 30, 2015 | 3:51 PM EDT

Tim Russert used to say “If it’s Sunday, it’s Meet the Press.” Of David Brooks, we might joke, “If it’s Friday, Brooks is bashing Ted Cruz.” On both NPR and PBS Friday, the purported conservative-leaning balance to public broadcasting’s natural socialist impulses insisted the problem was that Cruz was just too smart.

On NPR’s All Things Considered, the headline for the week-in-politics segment was “Sen. Harry Reid's Retirement, Cruz's Appeal To Far-Right.”

By Clay Waters | March 30, 2015 | 12:07 PM EDT

Adam Davidson of National Public Radio lumped people who oppose illegal immigration with racists and homophobes (like his grandfather) in the New York Times magazine:

When I was growing up in the 1980s, I watched my grandfather -- my dad’s stepdad -- struggle with his own prejudice. He was a blue-collar World War II veteran who loved his family above all things and was constantly afraid for them. He carried a gun and, like many men of his generation, saw threats in people he didn’t understand: African-Americans, independent women, gays. By the time he died, 10 years ago, he had softened. He stopped using racist and homophobic slurs; he even hugged my gay cousin. But there was one view he wasn’t going to change. He had no time for Hispanics, he told us, and he wasn’t backing down. After all, this wasn’t a matter of bigotry. It was plain economics. These immigrants were stealing jobs from “Americans.”

By Tim Graham | March 30, 2015 | 6:58 AM EDT

In exploring the blooming career of Monica Lewinsky as an anti-cyberbullying activist, it’s not only Lewinsky that’s trying to rehabilitate or reinvent hereself. It’s also a chance for the liberal media to revise feminist history. See The New York Times, with an article last week “Monica Lewinsky Is Back, But This Time on Her Terms.” Reporter Jessica Bennett lauded Lewinsky for “a biting cultural critique about humiliation as commodity.”

She even turned to Gloria Steinem for commentary. “It’s a sexual shaming that is far more directed at women than at men,” Steinem wrote in an email, noting that in Lewinsky’s case, she was also targeted by the “ultraright wing.” She thanked Lewinsky “for having the courage to return to the public eye.”

By Bryan Ballas | March 24, 2015 | 4:22 PM EDT

The birther issue is back. No, not the Obama birther crazies; the Ted Cruz birther crazies.

In an interview with National Public Radio (NPR) on Monday's All Things Considered, Sarah Duggin of the Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law claimed that Ted Cruz’s eligibility for the Presidency is not “an open-and-shut case” because “we don’t know precisely what the framers of the Constitution meant when they put into Article II that no person except a natural-born citizen shall be eligible to the office of president.”