NPR

By Tim Graham | December 24, 2014 | 9:23 AM EST

The season of Christmas and Hanukkah is just another season for National Public Radio to describe religion as a negative force for judgmental people massaging their own ego by being self-righteous. On the December 19 TED Radio Hour -- a spinoff of the TED Talks enterprise -- host Guy Raz asked author Karen Armstrong about how divisive religion is.

By Tim Graham | December 8, 2014 | 2:04 PM EST

The Catholic Church’s Diocese of Brooklyn is marketing its Christmas celebrations to millennial “hipsters” with an ad campaign focusing on concepts like nightclubs and selfies. One shows a church door with the slogan “Everyone’s on the list,” in contrast to an exclusive nightclub. Another shows an attractive brunette in glasses taking a selfie with the slogan “It’s Never Just a  Selfie,” and behind the woman is an image of Jesus Christ.

This marketing campaign became grist for secular-progressive mockery on Saturday on National Public Radio. The host of their game show “”Wait! Wait! Don’t Tell Me” suggested Jesus couldn’t take the selfie with the young lady because “his hands were occupied.”

By Tim Graham | December 7, 2014 | 9:24 AM EST

Liberal reporters cannot believe conservatives see Jeb Bush as a Republican establishment figure, a moderate squish. Mark Levin calls him a “very good moderate Democrat.” In Politico magazine, NPR’s S.V. Date couldn’t believe it; neither could Adam C. Smith of the Tampa Bay Times.

Both journalists thought conservatives were just misunderstanding reality.

By Jeffrey Meyer | December 1, 2014 | 2:45 PM EST

On December 11, the continuing resolution currently funding the federal government will expire and that seemed like the perfect opportunity for the folks at National Public Radio to speculate about a possible GOP-caused government shutdown. Appearing on NPR’s Morning Edition on Monday, December 1, Steve Inskeep and Cokie Roberts went to great lengths discussing how the Republican Party could shut down the federal government. Even though Roberts conceded that a shutdown was unlikely, the NPR correspondent did her best to repeatedly play up how the GOP wants to “to keep the option open all the time.” 

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | November 22, 2014 | 7:58 AM EST

The liberal myth surrounding the hypercompetent Barack Obama faded long ago, but the liberal myth of “cultural icon” Jon Stewart is only getting stronger. Stewart’s tour of interviews for the new movie he directed, “Rosewater,” has created a parade of flatterers, sycophants, and every other synonym in the thesaurus for “obsequious.”

Roy Sekoff at The Huffington Post stands out by insisting the movie only polishes this walking statue: “In finding this format, in this form, you have become obviously a cultural icon, maybe one of the dominant figures in the political discourse.”

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | November 22, 2014 | 7:58 AM EST

The liberal myth surrounding the hypercompetent Barack Obama faded long ago, but the liberal myth of “cultural icon” Jon Stewart is only getting stronger. Stewart’s tour of interviews for the new movie he directed, “Rosewater,” has created a parade of flatterers, sycophants, and every other synonym in the thesaurus for “obsequious.”

Roy Sekoff at The Huffington Post stands out by insisting the movie only polishes this walking statue: “In finding this format, in this form, you have become obviously a cultural icon, maybe one of the dominant figures in the political discourse.”

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 10:49 PM EST

After the 2012 campaign, liberal journalists swarmed around Republican Party chair Reince Priebus offering what was called an “autopsy” on every way Republicans failed, with a special emphasis on more outreach to minority voters. Democrats and their media enablers painted a picture of demographic doom for an aging white Republican base.

Two years later, Republicans made dramatic gains among minority voters. In House races across America, Republicans won 50 percent of the Asian vote to 49 percent for Democrats. Republicans won 38 percent of the Hispanic vote in House races. Gov. Sam Brownback drew 47 percent of Hispanics in Kansas, and Gov-elect Greg Abbott pulled in 44 percent of Hispanics in Texas.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 10:49 PM EST

After the 2012 campaign, liberal journalists swarmed around Republican Party chair Reince Priebus offering what was called an “autopsy” on every way Republicans failed, with a special emphasis on more outreach to minority voters. Democrats and their media enablers painted a picture of demographic doom for an aging white Republican base.

Two years later, Republicans made dramatic gains among minority voters. In House races across America, Republicans won 50 percent of the Asian vote to 49 percent for Democrats. Republicans won 38 percent of the Hispanic vote in House races. Gov. Sam Brownback drew 47 percent of Hispanics in Kansas, and Gov-elect Greg Abbott pulled in 44 percent of Hispanics in Texas.

By Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 12:02 PM EST

NPR and PBS have finally touched the Gruber brouhaha, but neither showed any enthusiasm for it. On Sunday morning’s Weekend Edition, anchor Rachel Martin and reporter Mara Liasson dismissed it in 59 seconds. 

On the PBS NewsHour Monday, anchor Judy Woodruff brought in two liberal journalists to discuss Gruber, but first Woodruff asked six questions about how open enrollment was going. 

By Tim Graham | November 16, 2014 | 8:18 AM EST

Pseudo-conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks -- appointed by both NPR and PBS to agree with liberals from the "Republican" side of the political divide on Friday-night "week in review" panels -- is back to bashing Ted Cruz, even though after the election, he admitted Republicans weren't too extreme to win all over the place.

Brooks was bashing Obama with the worst cudgel he could imagine: Mr. President, don't pull a "total Ted Cruz manuever" and force amnesty by executive order. He said the same thing on PBS.

By Geoffrey Dickens | November 13, 2014 | 10:37 AM EST

Just imagine the reaction of the liberal media if a video had surfaced of a George W. Bush administration official admitting that “lack of transparency” was “a huge political advantage” in selling the Iraq war and that they relied on the “stupidity of the American voter” to launch an attack on Iraq? That video would be everywhere. However, the clip of ObamaCare architect Jonathan Gruber using those exact phrases in talking about the passage of the Affordable Care Act has yet to be reported on ABC or NBC’s evening or morning shows.

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 12, 2014 | 3:05 PM EST

Chuck Todd, NBC News Political Director and moderator of Meet the Press, appeared on NPR’s The Diane Rehm Show on Tuesday November 11, to promote his new book "The Stranger: Barack Obama in the White House." During his appearance, the NBC host defended Obama’s 2008 speech in which then-candidate Obama claimed “bitter Americans” “cling to guns or religion.” Todd argued that Obama’s “just observing the way an anthropologist would observe a society.”