By Curtis Houck | February 2, 2016 | 7:22 PM EST

After FNC’s Outnumbered offered near unanimous condemnation of National Review’s anti-Donald Trump issue and editor-in-chief Rich Lowry a few weeks ago, Lowry responded as a guest host on Tuesday’s show and not surprisingly was bombarded with criticism and accused of being “elitist,” “really, really rude,” and part of “the establishment” for having “insulted” voters by opposing Trump.

By Tom Johnson | February 1, 2016 | 10:10 AM EST

The kids in The Family Circus blame their misbehavior on gremlins with names like Ida Know and Not Me. The Week’s Damon Linker believes grown-up conservatives do something similar when they deny what Linker sees as the plain truth: that they run the Republican party.

In a Tuesday column, Linker contended that the right-wing “counter-establishment” that first gained a share of power in 1981 now “simply is the conservative and Republican establishment…[But] because its ideological outlook was formed when it was out of power, this establishment seems incapable of thinking about itself as an establishment.” He charged that "by thinking of themselves as perennially outside the Republican power-structure, members of the counter-establishment conveniently exempt themselves from the need to admit and learn from their own mistakes. It's always someone else's fault.”

By Curtis Houck | January 24, 2016 | 4:09 PM EST

Near the tail end of a debate on Sunday during ABC’s This Week over the anti-Donald Trump issue of National Review, National Review editor in chief Rich Lowry blasted Republican strategist Alex Castellanos for coming out as someone who’d accept Trump as the GOP nominee after his attempts to seek alternatives (i.e. a moderate, establishment candidate) failed and “your donors wouldn't go with you.”

By Tom Johnson | January 23, 2016 | 3:14 PM EST

Commenting Friday on National Review’s anti-Donald Trump editorial and symposium, The New Republic’s Jeet Heer and New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait agreed that conservatives are responsible for Trump’s Republican frontrunner status, but differed on which unpleasant right-wing trait, “white identity politics” or anti-intellectualism, was the prime mover.

By Tim Graham | January 23, 2016 | 2:57 PM EST

On Friday night’s Hardball, host Chris Matthews unleashed a harangue on National Review writer Eliana Johnson, theorizing that the “Against Trump” symposium was pretty much all about Trump’s opposition to the Iraq war.

When Johnson insisted this isn’t single-issue thing, Matthews kept berating her: “Can you answer me? Which is not a hawk in that group?” Johnson didn’t offer a name, but could have: David Boaz, co-founder of the libertarian Cato Institute.

By Tim Graham | January 22, 2016 | 4:24 PM EST

National Review was clearly outnumbered on the Fox News show Outnumbered today. The entire panel lit into NR for daring to assemble a symposium titled “Against Trump.” The Fox panel was unanimous that this was “offensive,” would have “zippo” effect, and only underlined that conservatives in “tassel loafers and bow ties” are “defunct” and “worthless.”

They professed their “love” for NR editor Rich Lowry, a Fox regular, but their words clearly said exactly the opposite. Aside from an 18-second soundbite from Lowry from Thursday night’s Kelly File, it was a rhetorical firing squad.

By Mark Finkelstein | January 22, 2016 | 8:28 AM EST

National Review was created by the great William F. Buckley, Jr., the brilliant pioneer of the modern conservative movement. Throughout the current presidential campaign season, NR has been a consistent critic of Donald Trump, whose conservatism it views with, to say the least, skepticism. And so it was entirely consistent for NR to publish "Against Trump," a special edition appearing today that assembles essays by an array of leading conservatives, including our own L. Brent Bozell.

That said, "Against Trump" came in for a barrage of criticism on today's Morning Joe. John Heilemann called it an "in-kind contribution" to Trump, by depicting him in precisely the way he prefers: as pitted against the Establishment. And Nicolle Wallace said it was a "stupid move and a stupid piece" that risks splitting the conservative media from the conservative base.

By Tom Blumer | December 13, 2015 | 11:24 PM EST

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Thursday that Joshua Williams "was sentenced ... to eight years in prison for starting a fire at a QuikTrip in Berkeley (a St. Louis suburb) after an officer-involved shooting there." The Dispatch apparently didn't think it important to tell readers that the crime spree which occurred after that shooting took place despite the fact that the suspect had pulled a gun on that officer.

I noted in a NewsBusters post a year ago that Williams' arrest on charges of "1st degree arson, 2nd degree burglary and misdemeanor theft," and his confession "to setting fires at the store in a videotaped interview" constituted a major establishment press embarrassment. You see, until then, outfits like the New York Times, MSNBC and others had, in the words of Ryan Lovelace at National Review, "depicted him as a hero of the summer protests" in Ferguson, Missouri.

By Curtis Houck | December 5, 2015 | 11:03 PM EST

On Saturday, the “big three” networks of ABC, CBS, and NBC continued to prove why the liberal media loves congratulating itself for their so-called accomplishments as the morning and evening newscasts spent nearly four minutes (without teases) cheering the “historic” decision by The New York Times to publish a “dramatic” front-page editorial chiding gun rights advocates and pushing for massive gun control/confiscation.

By Curtis Houck | December 1, 2015 | 8:07 AM EST

In a thorough takedown of the left and the liberal media over their double standard in selectively assigning blame after mass shootings, the Fox News Channel’s Megyn Kelly dismantled on Monday night the arguments of abortion activists who have rushed to blame conservatives and the pro-life movement for supposedly causing the deadly shooting Friday at a Planned Parenthood facility in Colorado.

By Tom Blumer | November 30, 2015 | 11:57 PM EST

If you think journalists' ignorance of American history and economic fundamentals is bad now, give it a few more years.

The University of North Carolina's School of Media and Journalism "has updated its curriculum requirements to give students more choice and flexibility in meeting the school’s graduation requirements. The change is in response to consistent feedback the school has received from students in its annual senior survey." You already know there's trouble if students who haven't been out in the real world yet are influencing the curriculum. Here's how much trouble:

By Tom Blumer | November 18, 2015 | 1:29 AM EST

Michael Weiss and Justin Miller at the Daily Beast are apparently really proud of themselves. They're claiming that because a passport found on one of the terrorists involved in last Friday's terrorist murder spree was a fake, it "means the (U.S.) governors’ freakout over refugees was based, at least in part, on a lie." Based on their headline ("GOP Guvs Rely on ISIS Lies to Reject Syrian Refugees"), their attack was only directed at Republican governors.

There are at least four problems with their assertion. The funniest one is that these two apparently have no business ever being trusted around a calclulator or a spreadsheet. It's either that, or Weiss and Miller really believe that 475 million Syrian refugess are spreading themselves throughout Europe and much of the rest of the world.