By Tom Blumer | September 26, 2016 | 7:36 PM EDT

Never let it be said that the folks at the Associated Press aren't on top of the news, making sure that readers as well as subscribers who use AP copy in their radio and TV broadcasts learn the most important developments of the day.

That's sarcasm, folks. Friday evening, in a story primarily about the FBI's grant of immunity to longtime Hillary Clinton assistant Cheryl Mills, the AP's Michael Biesecker blandly informed readers — in Paragraph 22 of 25 — that, in regards to her illegal and improperly secured private server, "The new FBI documents (released Friday) also reveal that Clinton occasionally exchanged messages with President Barack Obama, who used a pseudonymous email address." That's it. Nothing unusual here. Now move along.

By Tom Johnson | August 1, 2016 | 8:45 PM EDT

Kevin Drum has been blogging for a long time, so it’s not surprising that he’s got a flair for clickbait. You have to admit that the Monday headline “Hillary Clinton Is One of America’s Most Honest Politicians” is quite an attention-grabber. Of course, whether or not it’s true is another matter. Drum commented, “All politicians lie sometimes. That includes Hillary Clinton. But...Hillary is one of the most honest politicians on the national stage...I know it's in their partisan self interest for conservatives to insist that Hillary is the world's biggest liar. But she isn't. Not by a long, long way. Republicans need to get the beam out of their own eye before they keep banging on about the mote in Hillary's.”

By Sam Dorman | July 8, 2016 | 2:43 PM EDT

Hillary Clinton’s proposal to spend $350 billion on “affordable” tuition may have been outrageous, but at least it provoked some poignant comments on the pitfalls of big government.

By Tom Blumer | July 1, 2016 | 11:33 PM EDT

On Thursday, CNN's Michelle Kosinski delivered the latest pity-party installment of "Darn Those Terrorists Getting in Obama's Way."

Moaning about "distractions" and the like has been a staple of media reporting since Barack Obama first took office in 2009. In recent years, as the number and severity of terrorist attacks has grown, largely as a result of feckless U.S. foreign policy, the press has taken to complaining on the White House's behalf that those attacks are overshadowing its agenda and distracting the President and his minions from talking about allegedly more important things, like ... climate change.

By Tom Blumer | June 13, 2016 | 6:05 PM EDT

In his second speech on Sunday morning's terrorist massacre in Orlando, Florida, President Barack Obama said on Monday that "the shooter was inspired by various extremist information that was disseminated over the Internet," that "we see no clear evidence that he was directed externally," and that "this is certainly an example of the kind of homegrown extremism that all of us have been so concerned about for a very long time."

The press, led as usual by the Associated Press, is certainly cooperating with those characterizations. Presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has clearly made up her mind that Omar Mateen committed a "lone wolf" attack, and that banning "assault weapons" would somehow prevent future such attacks. The problem, of course, is what one means by "homegrown" and "directed."

By Nicholas Fondacaro | May 12, 2016 | 9:04 PM EDT

Thursday evening saw the failure of all three of the network news outlets to report on the massive legal blow to ObamaCare. In her decision, U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer ruled that the Obama administration’s unilateral funding of $175 billion to insurance subsidies was unconstitutional. The ruling was a major win for House Republicans, a victory that was a long time coming. With a lack of funding through the subsidies, and large insurance companies fleeing the exchanges, ObamaCare might be on its last leg. 

By Curtis Houck | May 3, 2016 | 4:43 PM EDT

In a fantastic piece that it’s highly recommended for news junkies and those interested in the media, National Review senior editor Jonah Goldberg took on MSNBC’s Morning Joe and their infatuation with Donald Trump as “unwatchable” and full of “condescending snootiness” that rivals the cast of Mean Girls

By Tom Blumer | April 22, 2016 | 9:50 PM EDT

Solary energy company SunEdison filed for bankruptcy on Thursday. According to Reuters, the company's stock traded as high as $33.44 in July 2015. The stock closed at 22 cents today. Nine years ago, the company's market value was over $17 billion. According to the Associated Press, in July of last year it was still worth $10 billion.

The losses aren't limited to investors, however, a fact that the establishment press has ignored in its SunEdison bankruptcy reports. As Roberty Bryce detailed at National Review on April 4 when the company's bankruptcy began to appear unavoidable, taxpayers have also seen lots of money go down the drain at SunEdison and another bankrupt renewables company — ten times what was lost in the $500 million Solyndra bankruptcy (bolds are mine):

By Curtis Houck | April 21, 2016 | 4:06 PM EDT

In his Politico column posted on Wednesday, National Review editor-in-chief Rich Lowry mounted a thorough trouncing of the liberal media for their universal gushing over Donald Trump’s win in the New York primary despite the fact that a landslide had long been predicted as a possibility.

By Tom Johnson | February 20, 2016 | 12:55 PM EST

From a flawed premise, it’s easy to reach a silly conclusion. TNR’s Jeet Heer proved that in a Thursday piece in which he argued that “racism [is now] integral to right-wing ideology” and that therefore Donald Trump is authentically conservative -- a “natural evolutionary product” of long-term trends in movement conservatism.

“If Republican voters were anywhere near as diverse as the Democrats’, a candidate like Trump would have been marginalized quickly,” contended Heer. “Conservative elites can denounce Trump all they want as a ‘cancer’ or an impostor. In truth, he is their true heir, the beneficiary of the policies the party has pursued for more than half a century.”

By Curtis Houck | February 2, 2016 | 7:22 PM EST

After FNC’s Outnumbered offered near unanimous condemnation of National Review’s anti-Donald Trump issue and editor-in-chief Rich Lowry a few weeks ago, Lowry responded as a guest host on Tuesday’s show and not surprisingly was bombarded with criticism and accused of being “elitist,” “really, really rude,” and part of “the establishment” for having “insulted” voters by opposing Trump.

By Tom Johnson | February 1, 2016 | 10:10 AM EST

The kids in The Family Circus blame their misbehavior on gremlins with names like Ida Know and Not Me. The Week’s Damon Linker believes grown-up conservatives do something similar when they deny what Linker sees as the plain truth: that they run the Republican party.

In a Tuesday column, Linker contended that the right-wing “counter-establishment” that first gained a share of power in 1981 now “simply is the conservative and Republican establishment…[But] because its ideological outlook was formed when it was out of power, this establishment seems incapable of thinking about itself as an establishment.” He charged that "by thinking of themselves as perennially outside the Republican power-structure, members of the counter-establishment conveniently exempt themselves from the need to admit and learn from their own mistakes. It's always someone else's fault.”