By Nicholas Fondacaro | May 12, 2016 | 9:04 PM EDT

Thursday evening saw the failure of all three of the network news outlets to report on the massive legal blow to ObamaCare. In her decision, U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer ruled that the Obama administration’s unilateral funding of $175 billion to insurance subsidies was unconstitutional. The ruling was a major win for House Republicans, a victory that was a long time coming. With a lack of funding through the subsidies, and large insurance companies fleeing the exchanges, ObamaCare might be on its last leg. 

By Curtis Houck | May 3, 2016 | 4:43 PM EDT

In a fantastic piece that it’s highly recommended for news junkies and those interested in the media, National Review senior editor Jonah Goldberg took on MSNBC’s Morning Joe and their infatuation with Donald Trump as “unwatchable” and full of “condescending snootiness” that rivals the cast of Mean Girls

By Tom Blumer | April 22, 2016 | 9:50 PM EDT

Solary energy company SunEdison filed for bankruptcy on Thursday. According to Reuters, the company's stock traded as high as $33.44 in July 2015. The stock closed at 22 cents today. Nine years ago, the company's market value was over $17 billion. According to the Associated Press, in July of last year it was still worth $10 billion.

The losses aren't limited to investors, however, a fact that the establishment press has ignored in its SunEdison bankruptcy reports. As Roberty Bryce detailed at National Review on April 4 when the company's bankruptcy began to appear unavoidable, taxpayers have also seen lots of money go down the drain at SunEdison and another bankrupt renewables company — ten times what was lost in the $500 million Solyndra bankruptcy (bolds are mine):

By Curtis Houck | April 21, 2016 | 4:06 PM EDT

In his Politico column posted on Wednesday, National Review editor-in-chief Rich Lowry mounted a thorough trouncing of the liberal media for their universal gushing over Donald Trump’s win in the New York primary despite the fact that a landslide had long been predicted as a possibility.

By Tom Johnson | February 20, 2016 | 12:55 PM EST

From a flawed premise, it’s easy to reach a silly conclusion. TNR’s Jeet Heer proved that in a Thursday piece in which he argued that “racism [is now] integral to right-wing ideology” and that therefore Donald Trump is authentically conservative -- a “natural evolutionary product” of long-term trends in movement conservatism.

“If Republican voters were anywhere near as diverse as the Democrats’, a candidate like Trump would have been marginalized quickly,” contended Heer. “Conservative elites can denounce Trump all they want as a ‘cancer’ or an impostor. In truth, he is their true heir, the beneficiary of the policies the party has pursued for more than half a century.”

By Curtis Houck | February 2, 2016 | 7:22 PM EST

After FNC’s Outnumbered offered near unanimous condemnation of National Review’s anti-Donald Trump issue and editor-in-chief Rich Lowry a few weeks ago, Lowry responded as a guest host on Tuesday’s show and not surprisingly was bombarded with criticism and accused of being “elitist,” “really, really rude,” and part of “the establishment” for having “insulted” voters by opposing Trump.

By Tom Johnson | February 1, 2016 | 10:10 AM EST

The kids in The Family Circus blame their misbehavior on gremlins with names like Ida Know and Not Me. The Week’s Damon Linker believes grown-up conservatives do something similar when they deny what Linker sees as the plain truth: that they run the Republican party.

In a Tuesday column, Linker contended that the right-wing “counter-establishment” that first gained a share of power in 1981 now “simply is the conservative and Republican establishment…[But] because its ideological outlook was formed when it was out of power, this establishment seems incapable of thinking about itself as an establishment.” He charged that "by thinking of themselves as perennially outside the Republican power-structure, members of the counter-establishment conveniently exempt themselves from the need to admit and learn from their own mistakes. It's always someone else's fault.”

By Curtis Houck | January 24, 2016 | 4:09 PM EST

Near the tail end of a debate on Sunday during ABC’s This Week over the anti-Donald Trump issue of National Review, National Review editor in chief Rich Lowry blasted Republican strategist Alex Castellanos for coming out as someone who’d accept Trump as the GOP nominee after his attempts to seek alternatives (i.e. a moderate, establishment candidate) failed and “your donors wouldn't go with you.”

By Tom Johnson | January 23, 2016 | 3:14 PM EST

Commenting Friday on National Review’s anti-Donald Trump editorial and symposium, The New Republic’s Jeet Heer and New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait agreed that conservatives are responsible for Trump’s Republican frontrunner status, but differed on which unpleasant right-wing trait, “white identity politics” or anti-intellectualism, was the prime mover.

By Tim Graham | January 23, 2016 | 2:57 PM EST

On Friday night’s Hardball, host Chris Matthews unleashed a harangue on National Review writer Eliana Johnson, theorizing that the “Against Trump” symposium was pretty much all about Trump’s opposition to the Iraq war.

When Johnson insisted this isn’t single-issue thing, Matthews kept berating her: “Can you answer me? Which is not a hawk in that group?” Johnson didn’t offer a name, but could have: David Boaz, co-founder of the libertarian Cato Institute.

By Tim Graham | January 22, 2016 | 4:24 PM EST

National Review was clearly outnumbered on the Fox News show Outnumbered today. The entire panel lit into NR for daring to assemble a symposium titled “Against Trump.” The Fox panel was unanimous that this was “offensive,” would have “zippo” effect, and only underlined that conservatives in “tassel loafers and bow ties” are “defunct” and “worthless.”

They professed their “love” for NR editor Rich Lowry, a Fox regular, but their words clearly said exactly the opposite. Aside from an 18-second soundbite from Lowry from Thursday night’s Kelly File, it was a rhetorical firing squad.

By Mark Finkelstein | January 22, 2016 | 8:28 AM EST

National Review was created by the great William F. Buckley, Jr., the brilliant pioneer of the modern conservative movement. Throughout the current presidential campaign season, NR has been a consistent critic of Donald Trump, whose conservatism it views with, to say the least, skepticism. And so it was entirely consistent for NR to publish "Against Trump," a special edition appearing today that assembles essays by an array of leading conservatives, including our own L. Brent Bozell.

That said, "Against Trump" came in for a barrage of criticism on today's Morning Joe. John Heilemann called it an "in-kind contribution" to Trump, by depicting him in precisely the way he prefers: as pitted against the Establishment. And Nicolle Wallace said it was a "stupid move and a stupid piece" that risks splitting the conservative media from the conservative base.