MSNBC

By Kyle Drennen | November 4, 2014 | 1:05 PM EST

Appearing on MSNBC's Morning Joe Tuesday morning, Politico's Jim VandeHei absurdly claimed that Republicans would be in big trouble if they took control of the Senate in the midterm election: "...even if Republicans win, I think they're going to be in a hell of a jam. In that they're not going to be able to get anything done."
 

By Ken Shepherd | November 3, 2014 | 8:54 PM EST

On his final Hardball before polls open for the 2014 midterm elections, MSNBC Chris Matthews groused about how an anti-Bruce Braley ad by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce was "dangerous."

By Scott Whitlock | November 3, 2014 | 5:42 PM EST

The liberals on MSNBC have already begun to pre-spin the reasons behind a possible Democratic disaster in Tuesday's midterms: It's because the party didn't tout Barack Obama's "accomplishments." Host Ronan Farrow complained: "But, if these Democratic candidates are just flouting the President and at a time when he faces a tough environment on the hill already, sort of adding to his woes, do they risk alienating Democratic voters with that kind of divisiveness?" 

By Kyle Drennen | November 3, 2014 | 4:15 PM EST

Appearing on MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports on Monday, NBC News special correspondent Tom Brokaw was already urging Republicans support liberal agenda items if they win control of the Senate in Tuesday's midterm election: "The question then is, what are they prepared to give to the Democrats to meet them in the middle ground? What are they going to do about immigration? What are they going to do about the minimum wage?"

By Rich Noyes | November 3, 2014 | 8:55 AM EST

This week, CBS's Norah O'Donnell invites ultra-left Senator Elizabeth Warren to explain "what's going to happen if Republicans take control," even as the ultra-partisan Chris Matthews sneers: "What's worse, [North Carolina GOP Senate candidate] Thom Tillis or Ebola?"

By Rich Noyes | November 1, 2014 | 2:25 PM EDT

Looking back at 2006, the media weren’t wagging their fingers at Democrats warning that, if they won Congress, it was their job to become responsible partners for then-President George W. Bush. Instead, the media were rejoicing at the idea that an all-Democratic Congress could tie up the Bush administration with subpoenas, and even impeachment.

By Mark Finkelstein | October 31, 2014 | 3:35 PM EDT

Comedy gold! As the co-founder of the Daily Show, Lizz Winstead might be a funny lady. But what she came up with today was surely an unintentional laugh line. Appearing on Joy Reid's MSNBC show this afternoon, Winstead blamed Wendy Davis' impending thrashing in her race for Governor of Texas on . . . "redistricting."  

Lizz, last time we looked, there is no districting—"re" or otherwise—when it comes to statewide races. The entire state is one big district that gets to vote for Governor. Oh, and for good measure, Lizz laid the rest of the blame on "the media." Right.  In a state where the major newspaper in three of the four largest cities have endorsed Davis.

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 31, 2014 | 11:07 AM EDT

MSNBC loves to run ads promoting its liberal “Lean Forward” programs but its latest celebratory commercial championing Morning Joe’s ratings “success” seems a bit odd. Over the last few days a new MSNBC ad hilariously has been running proclaiming that “2014 marks the fifth straight year Morning Joe continues to beat CNN. Since 2010 Morning Joe has out-delivered CNN as the place to get the top news headlines, comprehensive analysis, and election coverage.” 

By Mark Finkelstein | October 30, 2014 | 5:26 PM EDT

Could this be the most cynical statement of the campaign season?  The woman whose recent wedding President Obama attended is okay with stoking the racial fears of black Americans—if that's what it takes to drive them to the polls and secure Dem victories. Alex Wagner devoted a segment of her MSNBC show today to the naked appeals to the racial fears of black Americans that Democrats are making in campaign ads.  Wagner discussed Dem ads that seek to stoke black fear toward Republicans by invoking Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown.

You might think Wagner would have condemned these ugly tactics, explicitly aimed at driving Americans apart based on their race.  Think again. To the contrary, Wagner concluded the segment by saying that it shouldn't have to be the kind of threats contained in these ads that get people to vote, "but if it does, so much stronger the party is for it."

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 30, 2014 | 12:06 PM EDT

On Tuesday night, Hardball host Chris Matthews decided to use Senator Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) latest campaign ad as the perfect opportunity to mock the Republican’s attempt to add some humor into the Kentucky Senate race. After showing the McConnell ad, which featured the GOPer playing with several bloodhounds, a reference to his famous ad from the 1980s, Matthews disgustingly asked his audience if they “remember the picture of Saddam Hussein patting the kid’s head? Anyways you saw that.” 

By Mark Finkelstein | October 30, 2014 | 9:12 AM EDT

You really have to watch the clip of President Obama strutting his self-righteous anger at states that are imposing Ebola quarantines.  I, Barack thunders that such quarantines reflect a lack of leadership, and "that's not who I am."  Thank you, sir, for letting us know what a strong leader you are.  

On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough scalded President Obama's self-righteous hypocrisy.  Mockingly quoting the President, Scarborough said "'This is America. And we do things differently'—unless it's in Barack Obama's own government, the military." Where of course a quarantine is being imposed on soldiers returning from Ebola hot zones. In the unkindest cut, Scarborough cast Obama's hypocrisy as "a Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker moment."  Ouch.

By Matthew Balan | October 28, 2014 | 5:37 PM EDT

MSNBC's Daniel Berger trumpeted on Tuesday that "Pope Francis broke with Catholic tradition Monday by declaring that the theories of evolution and the Big Bang are real." Berger later asserted that Pope Francis's "language was a significant departure from Benedict XVI and his close advisers, who had voiced support for the idea that intelligent design underpins evolution."