MSNBC

By Curtis Houck | January 9, 2015 | 4:06 PM EST

In the midst of MSNBC’s coverage on the aftermath of the dual hostage situations in France that resulted in three terrorists being killed, MSNBC terrorism analyst Evan Kohlmann railed against the “openly racist,” “prejudice[d],” and “hateful” National Front party in France as being “as much of the problem as jihadists are” for the country.

Following the airing of a speech by French President François Hollande, MSNBC’s Chris Hayes brought up the plans for a national unity march in Paris on Sunday that would feature all political parties with the exception of the National Front, which is currently led by Marine Le Pen.

By Kyle Drennen | January 9, 2015 | 2:38 PM EST

During her Friday show on MSNBC, amid live coverage of French authorities killing multiple terror suspects following dual hostage standoffs, host Andrea Mitchell lamented the fact that President Obama's political agenda may be setback by the attacks in Paris. Talking to Maine Senator Angus King, she fretted: "Do you think that this terror incident will in any way slow down the President's intention to continue drawing down from Guantanamo and to eventually close that facility, if possible?"

By Kyle Drennen | January 9, 2015 | 10:47 AM EST

One day after a brutal terrorist attack in Paris by Islamic radicals, MSNBC host Andrea Mitchell spent much of her Thursday show wringing her hands over Muslims in France and Europe being "under fire." Talking to Muslim Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison, Mitchell worried: "This is a challenge for France, which has had a lot of negative legal actions and restrictive laws and a large Muslim community....What is the challenge as they approach this manhunt to not begin racial or religious profiling?"

By Mark Finkelstein | January 9, 2015 | 8:27 AM EST

Zbigniew Brzezinski, the man who advised President Obama to shoot down Israeli planes, now argues for the appeasement of radical Islam.

Appearing on today's Morning Joe, Jimmy Carter's former national security adviser criticized some of the satire directed at Islam as "unnecessarily nasty" and "extraordinarily provocative."  He said that it was very important "to avoid becoming the number one enemy of the fanatics." Brzezinski argued that we must not be engaged "in anything that appears to be a struggle against Islam," and he criticized President George W. Bush for speaking of a war against "jihadist terror." According to Brzezinksi, "jihadist terror to Islam, to Muslims, means just war." 

By Mark Finkelstein | January 8, 2015 | 8:36 PM EST

Could the Charlie Hebdo attack be opening the eyes of some in the liberal media?

On his MSNBC show this evening, Ed Schultz surprisingly said "when something like [Charlie Hebdo] comes up, when you start talking about the militarization of police you start understand it a little bit or maybe to view it in a different light."   Welcome to the real world, Ed.

By Ken Shepherd | January 8, 2015 | 8:24 PM EST

Equipped with two liberal journalists and moderate Republican Michael Steele, MSNBC's Chris Matthews set about on his January 8 Hardball program to bash Sen. Lindsey Graham (R), former Amb. John Bolton, and talk-show host Rush Limbaugh for their criticism of President Obama's handling of the war on terrorism in light of the deadly terroristic shooting spree at the Paris headquarters of Charlie Hebdo yesterday.

By Ken Shepherd | January 8, 2015 | 5:34 PM EST

MSNBC host Joy Reid closed her January 8 program with a commentary that explored the question of whether the news media have consistent, objective criteria for labeling violent and destructive acts as terrorism. Reid's commentary was pegged to the difference in news coverage between the Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris and a botched bombing of an NAACP chapter office in Colorado.

By Scott Whitlock | January 8, 2015 | 5:06 PM EST

For the second time in 24 hours, MSNBC featured former Newsweek columnist Christopher Dickey to worry about how the "far-right" will exploit the terrorist shooting in France.

By Kyle Drennen | January 8, 2015 | 3:29 PM EST

Appearing on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Thursday, David Rothkopf, CEO and editor of The FP Group, which publishes Foreign Policy magazine, warned against European authorities being too aggressive in fighting Islamic terrorism following the brutal attack in Paris: "I think we have to be just as worried about the reaction to the attack from nationalists, from right-wingers, from people who have sought to drive this wedge...between the Islamic communities and the mainstream communities in Europe....it's very important that we recognize the value of restraint in response to these things."

By Geoffrey Dickens | January 8, 2015 | 9:56 AM EST

This week the media greeted the new GOP Congress with fears about a conservative “kamikaze caucus,” pushing “confrontation with Obama,” and stressed that if Republicans were to be successful they needed to look less “scary,” as they pointed out the 114th Congress was “80 percent white, 80 percent male and 92 percent of its members are Christian.” But in 2007, when Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats took over the House, the tone from the liberal media was very different.

By Mark Finkelstein | January 8, 2015 | 9:47 AM EST

If 16% of American conservatives supported suicide bombings and other violence against civilian targets, do you think the MSM would characterize that proportion as "minuscule" and fret that other conservatives were being "stained" as a result?

Yet on today's Morning Joe, there was Christopher Dickey, the Daily Beast's foreign editor, describing as "minuscule" the proportion of Muslims in France who support yesterday's kind of violence. Dickey worried that other Muslims in France will suffer a resultant "stain." But is the proportion truly "minuscule?"  A Pew poll from 2007 found that 16% of Muslims in France support suicide attacks and other violence against civilian targets at least sometimes, including 6% supporting such attacks "often."  With about six million Muslims in France, that potentially represents hundreds of thousands of people.

By Curtis Houck | January 8, 2015 | 12:15 AM EST

Following the deadly Islamic terrorist attack in Paris on Wednesday, major broadcast networks ABC and NBC joined other news outlets in not showing any of the controversial cartoons of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad from the Charlie Hebdo magazine during their evening newscasts.

Despite initially telling Buzzfeed that they would not be showing any of the cartoons, CBS News did go forward and displayed three of them on the air during the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley. The three were shown as part of a report by CBS News foreign correspondent Elizabeth Palmer from Paris that led off the broadcast.