MSNBC

By Mark Finkelstein | October 20, 2014 | 9:48 AM EDT

Tart-tongued Tina Brown is at it again. On today's Morning Joe, seeking to explain why Republicans are doing surprisingly well with women voters this year, Brown said: "they had their rabies shots."

By Rich Noyes | October 20, 2014 | 8:40 AM EDT

With the first confirmed cases of Ebola in America, CNN's Van Jones urges Democrats to exploit the issue: "We've got to get our base going....This Ebola thing is the best argument you can make for the kind of government that we believe in." But when Republicans criticize the Obama administration's response, journalists sneer. "This is the politics of fear. It's irresponsible," chastised MSNBC's Craig Melvin.

By Mark Finkelstein | October 17, 2014 | 6:12 PM EDT

The web page for MSNBC's The Cycle has the chutzpah to describe co-host Abby Huntsman as a "conservative."  Whatever happened to truth in advertising?

On today's episode, Huntsman again demonstrated why the conservative tag doesn't fit.  As a guest offered up a laughably lame analogy in arguing against a travel ban on people from Ebola-affected countries, Huntsman was quick to weigh in with an approving comment.

By Curtis Houck | October 17, 2014 | 4:07 PM EDT

On Thursday night, MSNBC host Chris Hayes took to bashing Republicans as the main culprits (and not the media) for causing fear in Americans over the current global Ebola outbreak during the first half of his show All In. Following an interview with Democratic Congresswoman Diane DeGette (Colo.) in which the two stated their oppositions to a ban on travel from West Africa and that DeGette was denied the request to have an Ebola hearing in early September, Hayes turned his attention to alleging Republicans of leading the emergence of “a kind-of Ebola trutherism” while “President Obama continues to resist Republicans’s calls for a travel band.”

By Ken Shepherd | October 17, 2014 | 4:05 PM EDT

MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell gave Republican-turned-independent and former South Dakota Senator Larry Pressler a relatively soft interview on the October 17 edition of her eponymous Andrea Mitchell Reports program. While Mitchell did press him on which party he would caucus with should he win election, the veteran journalist failed to even mention that Pressler, like fellow Midwesterner Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), is the subject of a residency controversy.

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 17, 2014 | 12:22 PM EDT

Charlie Crist, Republican turned Independent turned Democrat, is challenging Governor Rick Scott (R-FL) in the upcoming November election and on Thursday night he was treated to a softball interview with MSNBC’s Chris Matthews following the “Fangate” controversy from a recent gubernatorial debate with his Republican opponent. Appearing on Hardball, Matthews obnoxiously called Scott’s actions during the debate “a clown act” before enthusiastically telling his Democratic guest that he’s “got to beat" Rick Scott in November. 

By Tim Graham | October 17, 2014 | 11:37 AM EDT

Thursday was the annual "Spirit Day" festivities of the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), and no one was more cooperative than MSNBC. Gay activist/anchor Thomas Roberts participated in a Twitter chat on Thursday afternoon with GLAAD president Sarah Kate Ellis (or as he called her, "Madame President SKE.")

In the chat, someone asked about electing candidates to legislate for the gay agenda, which naturally, Roberts tweeted was "Step #1" for "equality and justice" to prevail in Americ

By Mark Finkelstein | October 17, 2014 | 8:18 AM EDT

The last time we looked, Barack Obama was President of the United States, not of some other country.  So if a ban on travel into the United States by people from Ebola-ravaged countries in West Africa would help America, isn't it President Obama's obligation to impose it, even if it might hurt those African countries?

On today's Morning Joe, HuffPo's Sam Stein twice acknowledged that the ban might "help America." Yet he argued against the ban on the grounds that it would hurt West Africa and make it harder to track people fleeing those countries. You sensed Sam's heart wasn't entirely in it, and when he finished Joe Scarborough thanked him, saying he was going to hit Stein's weak offering out of the park, as that SF Giants batter did last night in the ninth.

By Mark Finkelstein | October 16, 2014 | 6:26 PM EDT

Here in the Dallas-Fort Worth area where I live, the Ebola outbreak is very much a local issue. Playing tennis with some buddies this morning, I remarked during a break: "can you imagine what a disaster this Ebola thing must be for Texas Presbyterian?  Who's going to want to go there?  The whole hospital could go out of business!"

Pretty obvious, no?  It would be akin to the financial disaster that would befall a restaurant if someone who dined there died of food poisoning. Well, obvious to you and me, perhaps.  But not to Ed Schultz.  On his MSNBC show this afternoon, Schultz repeatedly blamed the profit motive for the hospital's shortcomings.

By Kyle Drennen | October 16, 2014 | 11:05 AM EDT

After citing numerous Republicans on the campaign trail criticizing the Obama administration's handling of the ebola crisis, on Thursday, MSNBC Daily Rundown host Craig Melvin condemned such criticism as "the politics of fear" and "irresponsible."

By Jeffrey Meyer | October 15, 2014 | 9:30 AM EDT

Veteran NBC News journalist Tom Brokaw appeared on MSNBC’s Morning Joe and mocked President Obama’s so-called coalition of nations fighting ISIS. Speaking on Wednesday morning, Brokaw used air quotes when describing the list of countries helping America fight ISIS before wondering “you see that whole list of people or countries lined up as our coalition partners against ISIS. What are they giving?”

By Mark Finkelstein | October 15, 2014 | 8:19 AM EDT

It was one thing for Joe Scarborough to make the case for Mitt Romney, arguing that these frightening times demand the kind of competence Romney offers.  

But on today's Morning Joe, it was stunning to hear a New York Dem like Donny Deutsch say something very similar. According to the ad man: "There is a psychological reason to go to Mitt Romney, and that is: wow!  We kind of made a mistake four years ago. We get to do a do-over. He was right about Syria, he was right about a lot of things."