MSNBC

By Mark Finkelstein | March 11, 2015 | 6:41 PM EDT

Could you use some "Hill-arity" after a long day? On the Ed Show Barbara Boxer claimed Republicans are going after Hillary "because they know she's exciting the public."  Right.  For good measure, Boxer said that she "unequivocally" trusts Hillary.

David Corn of way-left Mother Jones was surprisingly skeptical, saying that "whether Barbara Boxer trusts her or not," Hillary critics have a point because she "tainted the chain of custody."

By Ken Shepherd | March 11, 2015 | 5:33 PM EDT

Perhaps because it's becoming harder and harder to defend Hillary Clinton on the merits, MSNBC.com has turned to the tried and true "hypocrisy" card to try to undercut Republican complaints about the former secretary of state's lack of transparency.

By Kyle Drennen | March 11, 2015 | 5:01 PM EDT

Appearing on MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports on Wednesday, Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer lectured the liberal journalist for daring to ask about the Hillary Clinton e-mail scandal: "Either you're going to listen to her and believe her that, in fact, she complied with the spirit and the letter of the law or you're not going to trust anything she says....And all of this, I think, is politics. I think it is sad. And most people want to hear what Hillary Clinton has to say about the issues."

By Jeffrey Meyer | March 11, 2015 | 11:05 AM EDT

Speaking to MSNBC's Rachel Maddow on Tuesday night, NBC's Andrea Mitchell blamed the press coverage of Hillary Clinton in the 1990s for why she created a wall of secrecy. Mitchell also complained about having to cover Hillary’s self-inflicted e-mail controversy instead on a women's rights report: “The Clinton Foundation and Gates Foundation report on the no ceilings report was very important and had a lot of data in it, and I wish we had been working on that, frankly.”

By Ken Shepherd | March 10, 2015 | 11:26 PM EDT

Closing a panel segment with three fellow liberals about the open letter to the Islamic Republic of Iran by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and 46 Republican colleagues, MSNBC's Chris Matthews subtly hinted that the president's race was a motivating factor for the missive. 

By Ken Shepherd | March 10, 2015 | 5:32 PM EDT

"Hillary Replies All" enthused the teaser headline at MSNBC.com this afternoon following former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's press conference regarding the email server scandal. "Clinton on emails: 'I fully complied with every rule,'" noted the subheader for the story filed by the Lean Forward network's Beth Fouhy and Alex Seitz-Wald.

By Kyle Drennen | March 10, 2015 | 4:10 PM EDT

On his Tuesday MSNBC show, host Thomas Roberts scolded Republicans for sending a letter to Iran objecting to the ongoing nuclear negotiations: "Certainly there's great politics at play here in dealing with the President's foreign policy....So this is another jab at the President's foreign policy, of trying to undercut it. What's the precedent, though, of a letter like this?" In reality, there have been several instances of Democratic members of Congress openly reaching out to foreign governments in defiance of Republican presidents.

By Mark Finkelstein | March 10, 2015 | 11:35 AM EDT

Let's call this one "technically true, but misleading."  On today's Daily Rundown, discussing the letter sent by Senate Republicans to the Iranian regime, Washington Post reporter Ishaan Tharoor said that "it is the president who ratifies treaties."  

Tharoor is right, but only in a trivial sense. The president does formally ratify treaties in that he exchanges instruments of ratification with the foreign power(s).   But that occurs only if and when the Senate has approved the treaty by a two-thirds majority vote. Tharoor made no mention of that little proviso.  

By Tom Blumer | March 10, 2015 | 10:15 AM EDT

Late Monday morning, reacting to a news Quinnipiac University poll about network trustworthiness, the Washington Post's Hunter Schwarz, at the paper's "The Fix" blog, pointed to Fox News's dominance and declared: "For millions of Americans, Fox News is the mainstream media."

Perhaps more surprising than Fox's dominance, but clearly supporting the statement Schwarz made, is the collective poor showing turned in by the Big 3 broadcast networks, whose combined most-trusted percentages came in just below Fox's.

By Bryan Ballas | March 10, 2015 | 6:17 AM EDT

MSNBC is not known for its showcasing conservative voices. When conservatives are invited, they are ruthlessly grilled and struggle to get a word in edgewise. With this in mind, it was surprising to see Andrew McCarthy of  National Review on MSNBC’s Morning Joe. Even more surprising was his comments on Benghazi and Hillary Clinton’s email scandal.

Willie Geist got to the heart of the discussion by asking McCarthy what his stake was in Clinton email controversy, “Is this about security? Is it about accountability and transparency?”

By Ken Shepherd | March 9, 2015 | 8:53 PM EDT

In a sign that the liberal media is deathly afraid of the American public coming around to Republican criticisms of President Obama vis-a-vis Iran, Hardball host Chris Matthews tonight suggested Republican senators may be guilty of sedition by violating the 1799 Logan Act. 

By Kyle Drennen | March 9, 2015 | 4:26 PM EDT

Appearing on MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports on Monday, longtime Democratic operative and Clinton adviser James Carville bizarrely claimed press coverage of the Hillary Clinton email scandal was just part of some right-wing plot: "All of this is just the same cockamamie stuff that we go through. The [New York] Times gets something from some right-wing talking points, they print the story....It's all about nothing."