Movies

By Ken Shepherd | June 4, 2013 | 6:09 PM EDT

It's one thing, perhaps, for a major movie critic to grouse about product placement in a major motion picture and deem such an action a "sell out." But when a business writer does so, it kind of makes you scratch your head.

Take TIME magazine's Brad Tuttle, whose beat his profile describes as covering "personal finance, travel and parenting, among other topics." In a June 4 piece headlined "Superman the Sell-Out? 'Man of Steel' Has Over 100 Promotional Partners," Tuttle groused about the various promotional tie-ins to the summer blockbuster:

By Liz Thatcher | May 29, 2013 | 3:32 PM EDT

“We are The East ... We want all those who are guilty to experience the terror of their crimes,” begins the trailer for a new Sundance Film Festival movie, set for limited release on May 31. One of the stars has said she thinks “there is an element of wish fulfillment” in the film, which depicts the group targeting businesspeople.

“The East” is a fictitious film that depicts the efforts of an anarchist environmentalist terrorist group that targets corporations and CEOs. Those terrorists appear to be the protagonists of the movie. In the minute and thirteen second trailer, there are depictions of the CEOs that this group will target with their eyes scratched out, and others with “GUILTY” stamped on their faces.

By Lauren Enk | May 29, 2013 | 2:21 PM EDT

Gay? Yes. Seductive and manipulative? Absolutely.  Narcissistic sex addict? You bet.  But a de facto child molester who had an affair with a minor? Nope, they left out that little detail about Liberace.  

“Behind the Candelabra,” the new HBO film about the famous gay pianist that made waves at Cannes this month, covered all the depressing details about ‘Lee’s’ turbulent homosexual affair with a man 47 years his junior, but conveniently forgot to mention that Scott Thorson, the younger half of the duo, was still a minor at only 16 years old when the two met.

By Tim Graham | May 26, 2013 | 8:39 AM EDT

NPR could stand for Not Pro-Religion. It’s the taxpayer-subsidized network with the Wiccan-priestess reporter. On Friday’s All Things Considered, NPR promoted a new horror movie in which “it’s not the Devil that’s scary.” Instead, “the religious horror is religion itself.”

NPR is pushing an “atheist’s take on Catholic horror.” Those teachings can be “terrifying.” (Disclaimer: NPR reserves the right to spare Muslims all of these criticisms.) The director’s name is Rodrigo Gudino, and reporter Beth Accomando explained the plot:

By Brent Bozell | May 25, 2013 | 8:00 AM EDT

Usually movie makers strive to stay ahead of the cultural curve. It makes them “visionaries,” who are “cutting edge,” because they “push the envelope.” Two years ago, “Occupy Wall Street” was the hot fad, stoking the usual left-wing outrage at bankers and the finance industry, who were portrayed as greedheads never held accountable for their crimes. Businessmen just twirl their mustaches and laugh evil laughs.

But that was two years ago. Time for something fresh – and edgy. A new movie suggests that movement was for sissies. It’s time for someone to start a new campaign: Assassinate Wall Street.

By Liz Thatcher | May 14, 2013 | 1:21 PM EDT

“Assault on Wall Street,” directed by Uwe Boll and starring Dominic Purcell, takes the liberal agenda to a whole new level. Every possible liberal ideal – anti-gun, anti-capitalism, the evils of health insurance companies, crazy gun supporters – is depicted in this 1 hour and 39 minute movie, which was released on May 10 in limited theaters and on Amazon instant video.

Within the first ten minutes, viewers were introduced to evil Wall Street executive Jeremy Stancroft (John Heard) saying, “Our responsibility begins and ends with our partners and shareholders and that is it.”

By Tim Graham | April 20, 2013 | 10:40 AM EDT

Christian Toto at Big Hollywood offered a review of the new Robert Redford movie "The Company You Keep." In short, he felt Redford bashed the profession of journalism, but couldn't quite do the same for violent leftists.

Redford plays a Weather Underground radical who changed his name and took up a new life as a defense attorney. This being Redford's movie, his character isn't really guilty of anything:

 

By Michelle Malkin | April 1, 2013 | 7:03 PM EDT

Bleeding-heart liberal Robert Redford is already the subject of early Oscar buzz. His much-hyped new film glamorizing the lives of Weather Underground domestic terrorists, "The Company You Keep," will be released in the U.S. next week. But peace-loving moviegoers should save their money and take a stand.

Hollywood's romanticizing of murderous radicals is an affront to decency. Redford and Company's rose-colored hagiography of bloodstained killers defiles the memory of all those victimized by leftwing militants on American soil.

By Ken Shepherd | February 27, 2013 | 4:15 PM EST

ESPN Pardon the Interruption co-host  Michael Wilbon is no fan of comedian Seth MacFarlane's performance as emcee of Sunday night's Oscar awards. But rather than leave his criticisms confined to the merits of MacFarlane's performance, the liberal former Washington Post sports columnist whipped out the race card on Washington, D.C.'s ESPN 980, reports WTOP.com:

"They got tired of famous black people, so they've got to go get a white guy? Affirmative action Academy Awards host?" Wilbon said. "Is that what this is about? Really?"

By Clay Waters | February 26, 2013 | 10:51 AM EST

New York Times reporter Jennifer Steinhauer missed the point in her Tuesday take on Michelle Obama's "star turn" on Oscar night to announce the award for best picture at the Academy Awards, "A Tale of Secret Talks and Intrigue Behind Michelle Obama's Oscars Appearance."

She may not have walked the red carpet, but Michelle Obama -- all bangs and biceps and bling -- had her own star turn during Sunday night’s Academy Awards ceremony, when she announced the winner for best picture via satellite from the White House.

By Clay Waters | February 25, 2013 | 1:39 PM EST

In the aftermath of the Oscars, New York Times fashion reporter Eric Wilson bizarrely documented an example of "feminine repression" on the red carpet in Monday's arts section. Almost as silly was a Critics' Notebook from the painfully political movie review duo Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott, who delivered the shocking news that Hollywood movies are less than historically reliable, while comparing Obama to President Lincoln.

By Clay Waters | February 11, 2013 | 3:10 PM EST

Larry Rohter, who was perhaps the New York Times' most biased reporter during the 2008 campaign (beating some stiff competition) now works the foreign arts beat. In a Sunday Arts & Leisure profile of Pablo Larrain, director of the movie "No," about the 1988 vote that ended the long dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, Rohter actually compared Pinochet indirectly to the Tea Party and the libertarian industrialists, the Koch brothers.