Movies

By Brent Bozell | January 18, 2014 | 8:14 AM EST

A few years back, during the Media Research Center's annual gala I was honored to pay tribute to the family of a real American hero, Michael Murphy, the Navy SEAL posthumously awarded the first Congressional Medal of Honor for service in Afghanistan, and the first since the Vietnam War. Few in the room knew the story because only Fox and a handful of other outlets told it.

When the medal was announced in 2007, William Kristol noted on “Fox News Sunday” that the news received a tiny fraction of the coverage given to the Nobel Peace Prize. The Nobel that year was awarded to Al Gore and the UN “climate change” alarmists. That award received endless accolades from the sycophantic press.  Kristol joked about the fans oozing over “what sacrifices he made” to make a scary documentary (while making fortunes of money off the issue as well).

By Matthew Philbin | January 13, 2014 | 5:01 PM EST

CNN’s Jake Tapper would have done well to read “Lone Survivor,” rather than just seeing the new movie, before interviewing former Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell last week. If he had, Tapper might have been more careful than to describe the deaths of Luttrell’s SEAL comrades in Afghanistan as “senseless.” And he would have been wary of Luttrell’s contempt for the liberal media.

The film “Lone Survivor, which ” took in $38.5 million at the box office its opening weekend is based on a 2010 book by Luttrell that tells the tragic story of a 2005 operation in which the three other members of Luttrell’s SEAL team, along with 17 other special ops warriors, were killed. The story turned on the team’s agonized decision to turn lose some Afghan goat herders who had stumbled onto its concealed position. As the SEALs had feared, the freed civilians went straight to the Taliban, precipitating the battle.

By Brent Bozell | January 11, 2014 | 8:06 AM EST

Inside twisted Tinseltown, Martin Scorsese has marked a new career achievement. His new film "The Wolf of Wall Street" includes a mighty 506 uses of the F-bomb in its three-hour running time. That's almost three curse words a minute.

Someone has proclaimed this the new record for F-bombs. Another Hollywood high mark. Scorsese often has hundreds of F-bombs in his films about crooks. But this takes the cake.

By Tim Graham | December 31, 2013 | 6:49 PM EST

New York Times entertainment reporters Brooks Barnes and Michael Cieply reviewed the year at the box office on Monday, another record year of almost $11 billion spent on movie tickets.

The top five grossing movies were all sequels (or in the case of “Monsters University,” a prequel), but the article got a little weird when they called it a “tough year for the good-behavior watchdogs of popular culture,” but only talked about scenes with smoking and guns!

By Brent Bozell | December 28, 2013 | 8:11 AM EST

Let's assess the winners in losers in American culture for 2013. Our first obvious winner is "Duck Dynasty" and its Phil Robertson. He's a winner for standing by his Christian principles after some inartful remarks about homosexuality.

A&E suspended him and put the usual statement that they are "champions" of the gay agenda -- and proceeded to start running "Duck Dynasty" marathons. Mark Steyn put it just right: the gay-left blacklisters insist "espousing conventional Christian morality, even off-air, is incompatible with American celebrity." Robertson has successfully shattered intolerance of the anti-Christian left.

By Christian Toto | December 13, 2013 | 6:59 AM EST

Quality movies routinely get snubbed this time of year as organizations release their "best of the year" proclamations.

It's still interesting to note that Philomena, a movie that accuses the Catholic Church of cruel adoption policies, and much worse, received several key nominations from the Golden Globes while Lone Survivor got shut out.

By Mark Finkelstein | December 2, 2013 | 8:29 AM EST

Potemkin Village, anyone?  Joe Scarborough has offered a scathing simile for the new-'n-improved Obamacare website.  On today's Morning Joe, he likened the site to the set of a Hollywood Western--pushing back the facade reveals that there's nothing behind it.

Even former Obama spox Robert Gibbs—proudly sporting an Auburn jersey—acknowledged that big chunks of the system, including the payment mechanism for subsidies, haven't even been built.  So people can go to the site, receive the illusion that they have obtained coverage, only to find that there is no follow-through.  View the video after the jump.

By Brent Bozell | November 16, 2013 | 8:08 AM EST

The modern movie ratings system was put in place by the Motion Picture Association of America in 1968 for parents to protect children under 18 from ultraviolent or sexually explicit material. Since 1968, avant-garde leftists have been trying to knock this voluntary system down.

The most recent example came with the raging ten-minute lesbian-sex scene that wowed the Cannes Film Festival (and won their Golden Palm) in "Blue Is the Warmest Color." The IFC Center in New York's Greenwich Village decided to shred the NC-17 rating for this movie because "it is our judgment that it is appropriate for mature, inquiring teenagers who are looking ahead to the emotional challenges and opportunities that adulthood holds."

By Tim Graham | November 16, 2013 | 7:33 AM EST

The “Newseum” in Washington is, like it sounds, a museum about journalism. Unlike most DC museums, it’s not free (or taxpayer-funded). It costs $21.95 for an adult to see exhibits like a reconstruction of the late NBC host Tim Russert’s office.

Since this doesn’t sound like a hot tourist destination, they’re now putting on the shamelessly Will-Ferrell- movie-promoting “Anchorman: The Exhibit” in a deal with Paramount Pictures. Get a load of the rationalizations in the Washington Post’s Express tabloid:

By Tim Graham | November 6, 2013 | 2:10 PM EST

Even as American movie theatres rebel against abiding by the NC-17 rating to keep high-school kids away from sex-drenched French movies, AP's Malin Rising reports (positively) that the Left would love to impose its own cultural standards on the movie industry: "movie theaters in equality-minded Sweden are introducing a new rating to highlight gender bias, or rather the absence of it."

To get an “A” rating, a movie must pass the so-called Bechdel test – named for American lesbian cartoonist Alison Bechdel, who created a new standard in her comic strip "Dykes to Watch Out For" in 1985 – that a movie “must have at least two named female characters who talk to each other about something other than a man.” So many movie classics fail this politically correct measurement:

By Tim Graham | November 3, 2013 | 8:11 AM EST

Do movie critics ever watch the trailers of their movies? Do they think their readers can’t Google search for the trailers? On Friday, Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday hailed a pro-abortionist propaganda film. "'After Tiller,' a lucid, even-tempered portrait of physicians who perform late-term abortions, exemplifies the crucial role documentaries have come to play in civic discourse, which is so often whipped into partisan fury and emotionalism.”

That's so dishonest it should earn four Pinocchios from Post fact checker Glenn Kessler. As anyone can see in the trailer, "After Tiller" has all the partisan fury and emotionalism you would expect from people who think the right to abort a baby is a righteous act. In their view, late-term abortionists are heroes and saints, and the pro-life activists are terrorists:

By Tim Graham | October 22, 2013 | 2:03 PM EDT

For anyone who thought WikiLeaks was a fascinating cinematic subject, The Hollywood Reporter is already offering an obituary: “The Fifth Estate quickly died, grossing a paltry $1.7 million from 1,769 theaters -- the worst opening of the year so far for a movie opening in more than 1,500 theaters.”

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has repeatedly criticized Bill Condon's film for Disney’s Touchstone label for a slanted presentation of himself and WikiLeaks. At one point, he even wrote a note to actor Benedict Cumberbatch asking the actor to drop out of the movie.