Movies

By Tim Graham | June 16, 2014 | 6:18 AM EDT

Gillian Robespierre, the feminist director of the abortion comedy Obvious Child, is not a fan of Fox News, as she revealed in an interview with Matt Juul Wednesday in the Boston Globe.

Asked about sexism and feminist hashtags on Twitter, she said "like, I’m watching a lot of CNBC and Fox News in these [expletive] hotel rooms and it’s just making my head spin. It just makes me really sad. It doesn’t feel like we’ve come too far, but then it feels like we have come far because we’re talking about it right now." It makes her have violent thoughts about the people on Fox:

By Tim Graham | June 15, 2014 | 8:38 AM EDT

After several tantrums about how movies with keep-the-baby messages spread “consoling fictions,” Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday was duty-bound to adore the “abortion comedy” Obvious Child, but did she have to embarrass herself by insisting it “may be the most pro-life movie of the year”?

Somehow, the movie Juno presented abortion as a “non-option,” but Hornaday loves a movie where keeping the baby is never an option. Depicting an abortion as the center of a “romantic comedy” is “cultural watershed territory," she oozed at review's end:

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | June 6, 2014 | 10:37 AM EDT

The feminist film critics can exhale now. Someone has finally concocted their dream movie: an “abortion comedy.” Because apparently nothing sounds funnier than an unplanned one-night stand and a courageous destruction of God's most beautiful and most innocent creation.

It's called "Obvious Child." Feminist lingo sells this monstrosity. Former “Saturday Night Live” cast member Jenny Slate plays Donna Stern, a standup comedian who “is forced to face the uncomfortable realities of independent womanhood for the first time.” A “drunken hookup – and epic lapse in prophylactic judgment – turns out to be the beginning of a hilarious and totally unplanned journey of self-discovery and empowerment.”

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | June 6, 2014 | 10:37 AM EDT

The feminist film critics can exhale now. Someone has finally concocted their dream movie: an “abortion comedy.” Because apparently nothing sounds funnier than an unplanned one-night stand and a courageous destruction of God's most beautiful and most innocent creation.

It's called "Obvious Child." Feminist lingo sells this monstrosity. Former “Saturday Night Live” cast member Jenny Slate plays Donna Stern, a standup comedian who “is forced to face the uncomfortable realities of independent womanhood for the first time.” A “drunken hookup – and epic lapse in prophylactic judgment – turns out to be the beginning of a hilarious and totally unplanned journey of self-discovery and empowerment.”

By Tim Graham | June 3, 2014 | 8:18 AM EDT

How radical is Hollywood? There are two competing movie projects sure to lionize Edward Snowden betraying America’s secrets. Naturally, one of them is helmed by Oliver Stone, who bows to no one in casting America as a global supervillain. See his Untold History of the United States bilge on Showtime.

"This is one of the greatest stories of our time," said the leftist director. "A real challenge." Stone has repeatedly called Snowden a "hero" and slammed President Obama as a "disgrace" for his "Bush-style eavesdropping techniques." A rival Snowden movie based on Glenn Greenwald's Snowden book No Place to Hide is also in the works from Michael Wilson and Barbara Broccoli,  producers of the James Bond movies. Alongside the Brian Williams softball special on NBC, there’s a “Snowden business” emerging:

By Jeffrey Lord | May 31, 2014 | 7:16 AM EDT

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Correction appended. Seth Rogen did not send the tweet mentioned below.)

Lights, action - cue the Leftists! Or, what comes around, goes around.

Seth Rogen, a Hollywood favorite as star or a supporting player in such gems as Knocked Up, The Green Hornet,The 40 Year Old Virgin and more, is having  what one might call a Martin Niemoller moment. Niemoller was the German Lutheran pastor who had the nerve to publicly oppose Hitler, being rewarded with seven years in a concentration camp. Niemoller famously wrote of the experience:

By Tim Graham | May 26, 2014 | 10:30 PM EDT

Feminist Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday was the first one to see Hollywood sexism in the stabbings and shootings of one sick young man at the University of California-Santa Barbara who killed six. Hornaday tweeted out her article: “In a shooter's videotaped diatribe, reflections of the sexism, insecurity and entitlement that plague Hollywood.”

Hornaday wrote that as Elliot Rodger bemoaned his life of “loneliness, rejection and unfulfilled desire” and “arrogantly announced that he would now prove his own status as ‘the true alpha male,’ he unwittingly expressed the toxic double helix of insecurity and entitlement that comprises Hollywood’s DNA.”

By Tim Graham | May 6, 2014 | 12:12 PM EDT

A new biopic about Ronald Reagan is in pre-production, and Paul Bond at The Hollywood Reporter relayed that Manifest Film Sales has picked up international sales rights and will introduce the project to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival.

The producers of the $25 million film, simply called Reagan, "inked a deal for a U.S. release on 3,000 screens and $35 million in prints and advertising." It doesn’t sound like a Oliver Stone hatchet job, but is based on his historic role in bringing down the Soviet empire.

By Tim Graham | May 5, 2014 | 8:41 AM EDT

In Saturday’s Washington Post, they published a letter to the editor from a Paul Whittemore in Spotsylvania, Virginia, who noticed the Post’s movie critics never attempted a movie review of God’s Not Dead, which has so far grossed $55.5 million at the box office and tiptoed back into the top ten this weekend.

On March 21, the Post could only report “This movie did not screen in time for critic review in Weekend.” As if the Posties couldn’t buy tickets at the cineplex? Whittemore also noticed the naughty, porny movies they did not skip:

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | April 26, 2014 | 8:03 AM EDT

The accountants in Hollywood don’t have to believe in Heaven to notice the box-office numbers on recent movies with religious themes. “Heaven Is For Real” opened in the days before Easter and grossed more than $22 million, coming in second for the weekend, just $3 million behind the latest “Captain America” blockbuster (in its third week). The movie‘s per-screen average — $8,895 — was far above the rest of the top five.

“Heaven Is For Real,” like many movies, is based on a best-selling book. It’s a real-life story about four-year-old Colton Burpo and his visions of Heaven after an emergency surgery in 2003. Within three weeks of its November 2010 release, the book debuted at number three on the New York Times bestseller list. Eventually it made its way to number one.

By Tim Graham | April 18, 2014 | 1:26 PM EDT

Ten years ago, Mel Gibson unveiled his massively successful movie The Passion of The Christ. It came out on Ash Wednesday (February 25, 2004), but is often re-viewed on Good Friday. It had a worldwide box-office gross of over $611 million.

In our Special Report on religion coverage that year, we explored how the TV networks attacked Gibson's movie as extreme, divisive, and potentially harmful  -- one CBS reporter even called it an "ecumenical suicide bomb" -- and how that differed from their fascination with theories in The DaVinci Code:

By Tim Graham | March 23, 2014 | 9:03 AM EDT

In the world of Hollywood politics, U.S. News & World Report is hyping "Peter Pan's Lily-White Tiger Lily Problem."  Warner Brothers is making a movie called "Pan" (due in July 2015), and the Indian princess Tiger Lily is being played by white actress Rooney Mara.

“This casting choice is particularly shameful for a children’s movie,” an outraged petition said. “Telling children their role models must all be white is unacceptable.” Tierney Sneed at U.S. News highlighted how this "stings" for the Native American actors: