Movies

By Tim Graham | September 6, 2014 | 6:33 AM EDT

The Hollywood Reporter announced that Jon Stewart’s new film “Rosewater” debuted at the Telluride Film Festival in Colorado. Their headline was “'Rosewater' Director Jon Stewart Receives Hero's Welcome.”

Apparently, Stewart is a hero when he shows up at film festivals where liberals cluster. Or he’s a hero for regularly banging away at Fox News on “The Daily Show.” Or he’s a hero for having a sense of nuance about the “greatly differing worldviews” in Iran. Writer Scott Feinberg does proclaim he’s a “fan of @BarackObama” on his Twitter bio.

By Tim Graham | August 29, 2014 | 9:46 AM EDT

Embodying the old Hollywood joke “I’ve always wanted to direct,” Comedy Central star Jon Stewart took an entire summer off last year to direct a film called “Rosewater” about Newsweek reporter Maziar Bahiri being abducted in Iran. In an early review in The Hollywood Reporter, film critic Todd McCarthy implies it’s a direct-to-video dud.

Only Stewart’s adoring liberal fans make this film worth any notice, he wrote. The atrocities of ISIS make the idea of being held hostage in Tehran lack a sense of compelling urgency and feels like a “sideshow” on the current scene in the Middle East (trailer below):

By Cal Thomas | July 29, 2014 | 9:45 PM EDT

With his approval numbers sinking to 39 percent a week ago, according to the Gallup tracking poll, President Obama isn't alone in having a bad summer. So isHollywood.

Entertainment Weekly calls gross receipts for what should have been a blockbuster July 4-6 weekend "downright terrifying." Writes EW, "Not only were grosses down 45 percent from last year's holiday, according to Boxofficemojo.com, but it was Hollywood's worst July 4weekend since 1999. (And that's not taking into account inflation. In fact, this was the worst July-holiday weekend for ticket sales since the summer of Dragnet in 1987.)"

By Tim Graham | July 27, 2014 | 12:56 PM EDT

Dinesh D’Souza’s new movie was finally noticed in The New York Times Friday – on the front page. The news story was “Heady Summer, Fateful Fall for a Conservative Firebrand.” Notice how “fall” had two meanings?

The Times has failed to notice Michael Moore’s nasty divorce and how his hypocrisy about wealth has been revealed. But D’Souza is front-page fodder mostly for his admitted violation of campaign-finance laws:

By Ken Shepherd | July 24, 2014 | 8:35 PM EDT

Hardball host Chris Matthews is quite the cinemaphile, frequently working movie references into his banter on the MSNBC program. So it was rather surprising when the MSNBC anchor made a whopper of a gaffe on his July 24 program regarding an iconic moment in the climactic lightsaber duel in the middle chapter of the original Star Wars trilogy, The Empire Strikes Back. It seems Matthews remembers Luke Skywalker losing the duel when Darth Vader cut of his arm, not merely his right hand.

The botched movie reference was made by Matthews as he relayed how the fictional villain has a higher favorability rating (58 percent) than any real-life 2016 presidential prospect, including Hillary Clinton (55 percent). Here's the relevant transcript (video follows page break):

By Tim Graham | July 20, 2014 | 11:34 PM EDT

Fred Thompson, a former senator and presidential candidate who returned to an acting career,  granted an interview to The Hollywood Reporter to promote his new movie “Persecuted,” the story of a televangelist framed for murder by powerful government officials.

Thompson acknowledges that conservatives in Hollywood have “a tougher road to travel” and try not to advertise their political views:

By Kristine Marsh | July 18, 2014 | 4:51 PM EDT

“This is no longer a Christian nation. In fact, it never has been,” says the Democrat senator in the Christian indie film “Persecuted,” opening in theaters July 18. It attempts to address the question of what the U.S. would look like if religious pluralism would have its way forced in by the federal government.

Sen. Harrison (played by Bruce Davidson) was explaining to televangelist John Luther (James Remar) as to why a religious equality bill should be passed. The movie is quite timely, fresh on the heels of the Hobby Lobby ruling.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | July 12, 2014 | 8:03 AM EDT

Dinesh D’Souza shocked the movie world in 2012 with his anti-Obama documentary "2016," which became the second highest-grossing documentary in U.S. movie history. On July 2, he unveiled his new documentary called "America: Imagine the World Without Her." It has already grossed $5 million in its first week.. One fictional competitor, the abortion-promoting comedy “Obvious Child,” barely grossed $2 million in its first month.

But there’s a more dramatic contrast. Film critics are supposed to judge art, but their liberal politics are smeared all over their reviews. Metacritic.com collects and analyzes movie reviews. “Obvious Child” drew a high Metacritic.com score of 75 (out of 100). For D’Souza’s “America,” it was a ridiculously low score of 14.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | July 12, 2014 | 8:03 AM EDT

Dinesh D’Souza shocked the movie world in 2012 with his anti-Obama documentary "2016," which became the second highest-grossing documentary in U.S. movie history. On July 2, he unveiled his new documentary called "America: Imagine the World Without Her." It has already grossed $5 million in its first week.. One fictional competitor, the abortion-promoting comedy “Obvious Child,” barely grossed $2 million in its first month.

But there’s a more dramatic contrast. Film critics are supposed to judge art, but their liberal politics are smeared all over their reviews. Metacritic.com collects and analyzes movie reviews. “Obvious Child” drew a high Metacritic.com score of 75 (out of 100). For D’Souza’s “America,” it was a ridiculously low score of 14.

By Jill Stanek | July 8, 2014 | 7:20 AM EDT

The abortion industry did its best to pitch the movie Obvious Child as an “unapologetic” but “hilarious” romantic comedy about abortion, even as the director and star eschewed such a depiction. And therein lies the irony.

Abortion proponents want desperately to remove the stigma surrounding abortion, and they desperately hoped Obvious Child would be a “game-changing” vehicle to entice and persuade pop culture.

By Tom Johnson | July 6, 2014 | 10:14 PM EDT

Would right-wingers like a larger presence in mainstream news and entertainment media, or would they rather grumble about the MSM’s liberal bias while patronizing conservative media outlets? To American Prospect blogger Paul Waldman, it’s clear that the second is correct.

Waldman’s peg for his Wednesday post was a National Review piece by editor and publisher Adam Bellow on the need for a conservative counterculture that would produce novels, movies, music, and so on. Apropos of Bellow’s comment that it’s too bad righties have “hived ourselves off into our own politicized media bubble,” Waldman snipes that conservatives want very much to stay inside said bubble, even though it leaves them prone to “all kinds of pathological beliefs and behaviors.”

By Tim Graham | June 24, 2014 | 8:36 PM EDT

It would have been shocking if the abortion comedy Obvious Child hadn’t been celebrated on Melissa Harris-Perry’s weekend show on MSNBC. But the spin on Sunday morning’s program could not have been expected.

“MHP” wanted to know if abortion opponents just couldn’t handle the uncomfortable truth about women’s sexuality and how women’s bodies operate. She asked Obvious filmmaker Gillian Robespierre if her abortion comedy could be a good educational “tool” for mothers to share with their daughters as they mature, and the answer led to the term “laminated uterus.” (Video below)