By Matthew Balan | May 5, 2016 | 1:18 PM EDT

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough faced off with Rob Reiner on Thursday's Morning Joe, after the liberal Hollywood producer/writer explained Donald Trump's base of support by underlining that "there are a lot of people who are racist in this country." Scarborough shot back, "Could this not be about working-class Americans being left behind by [the] Republican Party?" Reiner acknowledged that "they're not all racist," but contended that "there's racism in this country that has been submerged for a long, long time....He's unearthed a lot of it."

By Mark Finkelstein | May 5, 2016 | 11:35 AM EDT

If it's sauce for the goose, it's sauce for the Hillary . . . Question for MSNBC's Katy Tur: of all the epithets Donald Trump pinned on his primary opponents, which was the first and arguably most effective? Bet you answered "low-energy," with which Trump of course famously jabbed Jeb. It stuck, and helped drive Jeb from the race.

Did people suggest at the time that Trump was hitting below the belt? Nope. So why is it suddenly unfair for Trump to say something very similar about Hillary? On today's Morning Joe, discussing Trump's critique of Hillary, Tur claimed: "there's this veiled sexism they have been accused of, somebody that doesn't have the strength and stamina, somebody who should not be president." 

By Mark Finkelstein | May 5, 2016 | 8:14 AM EDT

Of everyone in the MSM, Joe Scarborough has been widely seen as the most ardent Trump supporter--starting from the day Donald descended that escalator with Melania. Scarborough would argue he was merely offering dispassionate political analysis--saying that Trump's chances should be taken seriously while others were disdainfully dismissing him. But for those of us who watched Joe day in and day out during the primary season, there seemed to be something much more than green-eyeshade analysis going on. Scarborough revelled in every poll and primary result favorable to Trump.

Which makes Scarborough's statement on today's Morning Joe so strange. Joe first expressed disappointment that yesterday, Trump "stuck by the Muslim ban." Scarborough then proclaimed "I'm never going to vote for a guy that is saying he is going to ban somebody just because of the God they worship." Note to Joe: from the beginning, Trump has said the ban would remain in place only until we can "figure out what is going on." Trump is not proposing to ban Muslims because they worship Allah, but because virtually all of the mass terrorists attacks in Europe and the US have been carried out by Muslims. As the San Bernadino slaughter demonstrated, US authorities manifestly have not "figured out" what's going on, since the Muslim murderers were supposedly screened and entered our country legally.

By Curtis Houck | May 3, 2016 | 4:43 PM EDT

In a fantastic piece that it’s highly recommended for news junkies and those interested in the media, National Review senior editor Jonah Goldberg took on MSNBC’s Morning Joe and their infatuation with Donald Trump as “unwatchable” and full of “condescending snootiness” that rivals the cast of Mean Girls

By Mark Finkelstein | May 3, 2016 | 10:24 AM EDT

One of our media bias categories at NewsBusters is Double Standards. There was a classic example of the phenomenon on today's Morning Joe. The show's running theme was relentless mockery and ridicule of Ted Cruz for crossing the street yesterday to calmly debate a group of Trump supporters. 

But later in the show, when a clip was run of Hillary being confronted by a West Virginian over her boast that she would "put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business," the panel reverentially praised Clinton, giving her "credit" for her courage in doing so. The panel had the chutzpah to insist that Hillary's moment was "organic" and wasn't staged. Really? She's sitting around a table with a handful of voters. Is Morning Joe asking us to believe that the former coal company worker wasn't hand picked and that Hillary wasn't fully briefed on what to expect? Please. Earlier, Mika Brzezinski actually introduced the Cruz segment by saying it was an example of someone "choking like a dog." The double standard was glaring and outrageous.

By Mark Finkelstein | May 2, 2016 | 8:21 AM EDT

Mike Barnicle's a guy from the Duke Ellington era, so I suppose it makes sense if he doesn't "get around much anymore." How else to explain his nonsensical statement on today's Morning Joe? When Joe Scarborough asked him why the FBI investigation of Hillary's email is taking so long, Barnicle said "I have not spoken to anyone who believes there is an indictable offense that has occurred."

Responded Scarborough sarcastically: "you're talking to a very tightly focused crowd there," adding that people in the intel community say "anybody else would be in prison right now." The befuddled Barnicle reversed himself moments later, saying "there's a couple of people I've spoken to who, you know, think that there should be sort of a Petraeus ruling on it, at a minimum." Petraeus was indicted and convicted of a misdemeanor for his mishandling of email. So which is it, Mike? 

By Tom Johnson | April 26, 2016 | 5:56 PM EDT

Republican politicians, more than their Democratic counterparts, tend to campaign on anti-Washington themes. That’s kind of odd, suggests Michael Tomasky, given that one of Washington’s quintessential institutions, Congress, helps the GOP by playing a crucial role in obscuring the American people’s fondness for liberal socioeconomic policies.

“If Congress is what you see when you see America,” wrote Tomasky in a Tuesday column, “then you see a place where roughly half—no, more than half—of the people think that raising the minimum wage is radical, or that health care is a privilege you have to earn, or that climate change is a fantasy…Out in the real country, only crackpots think these things…But the crackpot community is dramatically overrepresented in Washington and skews the way all these things are discussed and described on shows like Morning Joe.”

By Mark Finkelstein | April 25, 2016 | 9:27 AM EDT

Joe Scarborough was careful to state for the record that he was "not voting for Hillary Clinton." But everything else he said during a segment on today's Morning Joe was one long love letter to her foreign policy and leadership skills.

Granted, Joe set the bar very low, comparing Hillary's prospective leadership to President Obama's fecklessness. Even so, it was striking to hear Scarborough proclaim "Hillary Clinton does not believe in leading from behind. Hillary Clinton does not believe that you sit back and let the events of the world shape the country. Hillary Clinton does not believe in the type of foreign policy, the don't-do-stupid-stuff foreign policy of Barack Obama." He also claimed that within a week of assuming office, Hillary would build better coaltions around the world and with congress than Obama ever did.

By Mark Finkelstein | April 22, 2016 | 1:58 PM EDT

Mike Barnicle prefaced his remarks on Obamacare by saying his understanding was "meager." He was grossly . . . overstating his knowledge. The subject in the Morning Joe segment today was UnitedHealthCare's decision to quit the Obamacare exchanges. Dr. Dave Campbell explained that UnitedHealthcare was going to lose $1 billion on Obamacare this year, and that all other insurers were also losing money.

That's when Barnicle piped up: "my understanding of it, meager as it is: so it's the profit motive that's going to drive these insurance companies out of the exchanges. They have boards of directors. They can't figure out how to retool their approach to it in order to make [money]?" Brilliant! Absolutely brilliant, Mike! Why didn't UnitedHealthcare think of that? If there's a problem with that profit-motive thingy, just have the board of directors figure out a way to turn a profit. Problem solved! 

By Brad Wilmouth | April 21, 2016 | 9:33 PM EDT

As former ABC This Week co-anchor Cokie Roberts appeared as a guest on Thursday's Morning Joe on MSNBC, she expressed agreement as liberal host Mika Brzezinski declared that GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz "seems like a terrible choice" for Republicans to support to stop Donald Trump from winning. Brzezinski proclaimed: "I'm sure it is a little bit of, for me, my world view, ideology, but it just seems like Ted Cruz seems like a terrible choice to try and use -- am I wrong? Help me out with some objectivity."

By Mark Finkelstein | April 20, 2016 | 11:30 AM EDT

Morning Joe regulars know that Mika Brzezinski has made a virtual art form out of her facial expressions and body language. On today's show, Mika put on a particularly demonstrative display of horror while asserting what she sees as Ted Cruz's lack of appeal to women voters.

The question on the table had been Donald Trump's surprisingly strong showing among women in yesterday's New York Republican primary. The Donald scored 59% of women voters, almost equaling the 63% of men voters he garnered. Gene Robinson was stumped to explain it. When he posited Ted Cruz as the alternative to Trump, someone to whom voters would be expected to "flock," Mika broke in: "I don't think women are going to flock to Ted Cruz." Mika accompanied her comment with animated expressions, looking to the sky, taking a deep breath then sharing a horrified look with someone offstage to her right. You can catch Mika's contortions 40 seconds into the video clip. See also screencap below.

By Mark Finkelstein | April 19, 2016 | 9:22 AM EDT

Barry Goldwater was a conservative hero and pioneer.  But his presidential run was an historic flop. So when Joe Scarborough described Ted Cruz on today's Morning Joe as "Barry Goldwater's ugly stepson," it was a scalding simile. Scarborough in turn scolded the Republican establishment for backing Cruz over John Kasich as the alternative to Donald Trump.

Scarborough's argument focused on electability. Scarborough predicted that in a general election against Hillary, Cruz would lose 40-41 states [actually a bit better than the 44 Goldwater lost]. The screencap shows Scarborough holding up a Boston Red Sox coffee cup while claiming the cup has a better chance of beating Hillary in swing states than Cruz. In contrast, Scarborough says Kasich would "blow her out."