By Curtis Houck | May 24, 2016 | 3:33 PM EDT

After a network blackout on Monday night of news the FBI has been investigating Democratic Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe for possible illegal campaign donations, ABC and CBS kept the streak alive on Tuesday morning as Good Morning America and CBS This Morning made no mention of the probe. In contrast, NBC’s Today provided a full report from Justice correspondent Pete Williams.

By Brad Wilmouth | May 17, 2016 | 2:13 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Monday's CNN Newsroom with Brooke Baldwin to promote her book, Capital Dames, ABC News veteran Cokie Roberts -- also of NPR -- complained that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump "created a lot of hatred and hostility" after "a half century of us trying to bring people together" as she invoked the Jim Crow South and blamed reports of children making racist insults on Trump's presidential campaign: "Having this whole two generations trying to bring America together and be one country, and to suddenly have a leader come in and try to break that all apart and pit groups against each other is very discouraging."

By Rich Noyes | May 16, 2016 | 8:57 AM EDT

This issue: Journalists laugh about the supposed death of the Republican Party, now that Donald Trump will be the presidential nominee, while the New York Times wishes Jon Stewart were still on TV to bash the GOP during this year's campaign. Plus, the media insist Hillary Clinton is honest, and her scandals are nothing more than “garbage” and “crud,” while Newsweek tweets: “Has there been any President cooler than Obama?”

By Matthew Balan | May 10, 2016 | 4:24 PM EDT

MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski gushed over Hillary Clinton on Tuesday's Morning Joe, and lamented how her campaign staff and the press are distracting her from showing her true self: "My gut is Hillary Clinton needs to be Hillary Clinton — the one that you meet one on one....She's going to have to just be herself — because herself has always been the best thing for her." Brzezinski later contended that "if she gets everybody out of her own way and just, kind of, speaks from the heart, I bet you it would be incredibly moving."

By Matthew Balan | May 9, 2016 | 1:35 PM EDT

MSNBC's Mark Halperin trumpeted the apparent power of the media on Monday's Morning Joe during a discussion about Donald Trump attacking the morning show: "The only way a Republican can win for president, I believe, is if the press favors them in coverage." Halperin then oddly claimed that Trump "had a chance to have better press coverage than Hillary Clinton. He's missing that chance. He's alienating a lot of people in the media." When Mika Brzezinski responded, "I don't think we're that important," the journalist retorted, "Oh, we are — the media overall....The press is really powerful."

By Matthew Balan | May 5, 2016 | 1:18 PM EDT

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough faced off with Rob Reiner on Thursday's Morning Joe, after the liberal Hollywood producer/writer explained Donald Trump's base of support by underlining that "there are a lot of people who are racist in this country." Scarborough shot back, "Could this not be about working-class Americans being left behind by [the] Republican Party?" Reiner acknowledged that "they're not all racist," but contended that "there's racism in this country that has been submerged for a long, long time....He's unearthed a lot of it."

By Mark Finkelstein | May 5, 2016 | 11:35 AM EDT

If it's sauce for the goose, it's sauce for the Hillary . . . Question for MSNBC's Katy Tur: of all the epithets Donald Trump pinned on his primary opponents, which was the first and arguably most effective? Bet you answered "low-energy," with which Trump of course famously jabbed Jeb. It stuck, and helped drive Jeb from the race.

Did people suggest at the time that Trump was hitting below the belt? Nope. So why is it suddenly unfair for Trump to say something very similar about Hillary? On today's Morning Joe, discussing Trump's critique of Hillary, Tur claimed: "there's this veiled sexism they have been accused of, somebody that doesn't have the strength and stamina, somebody who should not be president." 

By Mark Finkelstein | May 5, 2016 | 8:14 AM EDT

Of everyone in the MSM, Joe Scarborough has been widely seen as the most ardent Trump supporter--starting from the day Donald descended that escalator with Melania. Scarborough would argue he was merely offering dispassionate political analysis--saying that Trump's chances should be taken seriously while others were disdainfully dismissing him. But for those of us who watched Joe day in and day out during the primary season, there seemed to be something much more than green-eyeshade analysis going on. Scarborough revelled in every poll and primary result favorable to Trump.

Which makes Scarborough's statement on today's Morning Joe so strange. Joe first expressed disappointment that yesterday, Trump "stuck by the Muslim ban." Scarborough then proclaimed "I'm never going to vote for a guy that is saying he is going to ban somebody just because of the God they worship." Note to Joe: from the beginning, Trump has said the ban would remain in place only until we can "figure out what is going on." Trump is not proposing to ban Muslims because they worship Allah, but because virtually all of the mass terrorists attacks in Europe and the US have been carried out by Muslims. As the San Bernadino slaughter demonstrated, US authorities manifestly have not "figured out" what's going on, since the Muslim murderers were supposedly screened and entered our country legally.

By Curtis Houck | May 3, 2016 | 4:43 PM EDT

In a fantastic piece that it’s highly recommended for news junkies and those interested in the media, National Review senior editor Jonah Goldberg took on MSNBC’s Morning Joe and their infatuation with Donald Trump as “unwatchable” and full of “condescending snootiness” that rivals the cast of Mean Girls

By Mark Finkelstein | May 3, 2016 | 10:24 AM EDT

One of our media bias categories at NewsBusters is Double Standards. There was a classic example of the phenomenon on today's Morning Joe. The show's running theme was relentless mockery and ridicule of Ted Cruz for crossing the street yesterday to calmly debate a group of Trump supporters. 

But later in the show, when a clip was run of Hillary being confronted by a West Virginian over her boast that she would "put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business," the panel reverentially praised Clinton, giving her "credit" for her courage in doing so. The panel had the chutzpah to insist that Hillary's moment was "organic" and wasn't staged. Really? She's sitting around a table with a handful of voters. Is Morning Joe asking us to believe that the former coal company worker wasn't hand picked and that Hillary wasn't fully briefed on what to expect? Please. Earlier, Mika Brzezinski actually introduced the Cruz segment by saying it was an example of someone "choking like a dog." The double standard was glaring and outrageous.

By Mark Finkelstein | May 2, 2016 | 8:21 AM EDT

Mike Barnicle's a guy from the Duke Ellington era, so I suppose it makes sense if he doesn't "get around much anymore." How else to explain his nonsensical statement on today's Morning Joe? When Joe Scarborough asked him why the FBI investigation of Hillary's email is taking so long, Barnicle said "I have not spoken to anyone who believes there is an indictable offense that has occurred."

Responded Scarborough sarcastically: "you're talking to a very tightly focused crowd there," adding that people in the intel community say "anybody else would be in prison right now." The befuddled Barnicle reversed himself moments later, saying "there's a couple of people I've spoken to who, you know, think that there should be sort of a Petraeus ruling on it, at a minimum." Petraeus was indicted and convicted of a misdemeanor for his mishandling of email. So which is it, Mike? 

By Tom Johnson | April 26, 2016 | 5:56 PM EDT

Republican politicians, more than their Democratic counterparts, tend to campaign on anti-Washington themes. That’s kind of odd, suggests Michael Tomasky, given that one of Washington’s quintessential institutions, Congress, helps the GOP by playing a crucial role in obscuring the American people’s fondness for liberal socioeconomic policies.

“If Congress is what you see when you see America,” wrote Tomasky in a Tuesday column, “then you see a place where roughly half—no, more than half—of the people think that raising the minimum wage is radical, or that health care is a privilege you have to earn, or that climate change is a fantasy…Out in the real country, only crackpots think these things…But the crackpot community is dramatically overrepresented in Washington and skews the way all these things are discussed and described on shows like Morning Joe.”