Morning Edition

By Jeffrey Meyer | December 1, 2014 | 2:45 PM EST

On December 11, the continuing resolution currently funding the federal government will expire and that seemed like the perfect opportunity for the folks at National Public Radio to speculate about a possible GOP-caused government shutdown. Appearing on NPR’s Morning Edition on Monday, December 1, Steve Inskeep and Cokie Roberts went to great lengths discussing how the Republican Party could shut down the federal government. Even though Roberts conceded that a shutdown was unlikely, the NPR correspondent did her best to repeatedly play up how the GOP wants to “to keep the option open all the time.” 

By Tim Graham | November 18, 2014 | 12:02 PM EST

NPR and PBS have finally touched the Gruber brouhaha, but neither showed any enthusiasm for it. On Sunday morning’s Weekend Edition, anchor Rachel Martin and reporter Mara Liasson dismissed it in 59 seconds. 

On the PBS NewsHour Monday, anchor Judy Woodruff brought in two liberal journalists to discuss Gruber, but first Woodruff asked six questions about how open enrollment was going. 

By Tim Graham | November 2, 2014 | 8:40 PM EST

In the October 13 edition of Time, they asked radical-left black professor Cornel West if he voted for Obama in 2012, and he said he couldn’t vote for a “war criminal.” NPR promoted this radical leftist on Saturday morning’s Weekend Edition, but in six minutes and 22 seconds, never mentioned the president or the 2014 elections.

This syrupy interview promoting West’s book Black Prophetic Fire ended with anchor Scott Simon utterly failing to notice (again) that the leftist Ferguson narrative of Evil Cop Shoots Gentle Giant is facing a serious clash with facts.

By Tim Graham | October 26, 2014 | 7:26 AM EDT

Count NPR as one of those national media outlets that just can’t really grasp the notion that the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and The Washington Post have ruined the narrative that “gentle giant” Michael Brown never wrestled police officer Darren Wilson for his gun. The finding of burns on the thumb “supports the fact that this guy is reaching for the gun, if he has gunpowder particulate material in the wound.” But NPR blurred over the inconvienent news.

By Jeffrey Meyer | September 19, 2014 | 12:35 PM EDT

Talk about tone deaf at National Public Radio. On Thursday’s All Things Considered, NPR reporter Don Gonyea ran a segment on Governor Chris Christie (R-N.J.) traveling to New Hampshire to campaign with Scott Brown as he seeks to become the next senator from there. 

Unsurprisingly, the NPR reporter did his best to play up the “Bridgegate” controversy despite the Department of Justice clearing Christie of any wrongdoing in the 2013 George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal. The accompanying story on the NPR website blared “Will bridge scandal jam Gov. Christie’s road show?” 

By Tim Graham | August 25, 2014 | 8:57 AM EDT

On Sunday morning’s Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR interviewed Mehdi Hasan, the political director of the Huffington Post’s U.K. edition. Online, the headline was “Journalist: It's Not Islam That Inspires U.K.'s Young Jihadis.” NPR never mentioned that Hasan is also a “presenter” for al-Jazeera with his own program “Head to Head.”     

As it became plain that the murderer of American journalist James Foley was British, NPR guest host Linda Wertheimer asked Hasan about his latest article, titled  "What The Jihadists Who Bought 'Islam For Dummies' On Amazon Tell Us About Radicalization." He insisted ISIS was an outgrowth of U.S. and U.K. foreign policy under George W. Bush and Tony Blair:

By Tim Graham | August 22, 2014 | 8:06 AM EDT

NPR again defined the abuse of its taxpayer subsidy to promote the Obama administration on Thursday’s Morning Edition. Online, they began their report on Attorney General Eric Holder this way: “The nation's top law enforcement officer traveled to Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday to wrap his arms around a community in pain.”

On air, reporter Carrie Johnson began: “From the moment he walked into a soul food restaurant in Ferguson, the attorney general found friends.” There was absolutely zero difference between the way a Holder press aide would have promoted Holder’s visit and the NPR version. It was all super-cozy:

By Matthew Balan | July 16, 2014 | 11:33 PM EDT

Anthony Mason spotlighted the death of comic book character Archie Andrews on Wednesday's CBS Evening News, and pointed out that "it all ends...when an adult Archie takes a bullet aimed by a stalker at a gay friend." Mason turned to the comics' publisher, Jon Goldwater, and wondered if he was "trying to make a political statement with this comic book" [MP3 audio available here; video below the jump].

Goldwater denied that he was doing so, even though he underlined that "gun violence is too prevalent in this country, and we should do everything we can to prevent it." However, just hours earlier on NPR's Morning Edition, he hinted that he was indeed making a political statement:

By Tim Graham | July 12, 2014 | 3:25 PM EDT

The very same National Public Radio that highlighted the fringy "extremism" of the 1964 Republican convention on Thursday night spent Thursday morning boosting the idea of a socialist President of the United States. Their online headline was "Could a Socialist Senator Become a National Brand?"

Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep introduced a promotional story on Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont by noting "this socialist barely got two percent of the vote when he first ran for office in the 1970s. Now he's thinking of running for president." Reporter Ailsa Chang boosted the mainstream appeal of Sanders-style socialism:

By Tim Graham | July 9, 2014 | 10:52 PM EDT

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik arrived late to the story of former CBS reporter Sharyl Attkisson on Monday’s Morning Edition. He found former NBC reporter Lisa Myers to agree with Attkisson’s point about TV news in the Obama years: “Overall, the mainstream media has been less eager to hold this administration accountable than it was to hold the Bush administration accountable.”

But Folkenflik also turned to how "Detractors say she sees conspiracies too readily." Washington Post media blogger Erik Wemple lashed out at Attkisson’s “act” of leaving CBS News:

By Matthew Balan | July 9, 2014 | 5:46 PM EDT

Adam Ragusea provided little balance on Wednesday's Morning Edition on NPR, as he covered a homosexual man's lawsuit against his former employer – a Catholic school – who let him go after he announced his planned same-sex "marriage" on Facebook. Ragusea played just one soundbite from a conservative legal scholar, and failed to include any from the local Catholic diocese or the school.

The Georgia Public Broadcasting correspondent touted how the supposedly "beloved" music teacher "has hope that he may be among the last generation of people who risk losing their job because they're gay." He also zeroed in on an ongoing lawsuit in Washington, DC that may give the educator ammo in his own litigation:

By Tim Graham | June 28, 2014 | 10:08 PM EDT

On NPR’s Morning Edition, anchor Steve Inskeep announced “It's Friday morning, which is when we hear from StoryCorps, which is marking the anniversary of a pivotal moment for gay rights -- the 1969 Stonewall riots – 45 years ago tomorrow, gay protesters clashed with police in New York. Now StoryCorps is launching an initiative to preserve the stories of LGBT people, which is called OutLoud.”

Inskeep turned to the testimony of a seventy-year old homosexual named Patrick Haggerty, who told a story about how he went to high school in rural Washington state with glitter on his face, and his father came to school in dirty farmer clothes. The father was hailed by the son: “I had the patron saint of dads for sissies.”