Morning Edition

By Jeffrey Meyer | July 8, 2015 | 3:42 PM EDT

During Hillary Clinton’s first national interview on CNN Tuesday, the Democratic presidential candidate was pressed about her use of a private e-mail server during her time as Secretary of State, but both PBS and NPR ignored the topic during their post-interview coverage on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.

By Tom Blumer | June 24, 2015 | 10:56 PM EDT

The politically correct speech police are everywhere these days. Many members of the leftist establishment have taken it upon themselves to aid in their enforcement efforts. No one is safe — not even the person they want us to believe is destined to be the Democrats' 2016 presidential nominee.

Yesterday, at a Florissant, Missouri church only five miles from Ferguson, Hillary Clinton uttered the following words in succession: "All lives matter." NPR's Tamara Keith and Amita Kelly devoted much of their four-minute "Morning Edition" report on her appearance to what was described as a "3-Word Misstep."

By Matthew Balan | June 12, 2015 | 9:45 PM EDT

Friday's Morning Edition on NPR spotlighted the author of children's books who asserted that the push for the legalization of same-sex "marriage" is "the same struggle" as the fight against bans on interracial marriage during the 1960s. Karen Grigsby Bates marked the anniversary of the 1967 Loving v. Virginia case, which struck down anti-miscegenation laws in the United States, by featuring writer/artist Selina Alko, who stated that "while the Loving case is long settled, it's still deeply relevant in the current fight for marriage equality."

By Matthew Balan | June 5, 2015 | 6:21 PM EDT

NPR's Morning Edition on Friday actually covered the EPA's new report that found that fracking for oil and natural gas "has not caused widespread pollution in drinking water," as host Renee Montagne put it. The liberal public radio network's report came as ABC and NBC maintained their blackout on the study on their morning and evening newscasts.

By Matthew Balan | May 29, 2015 | 5:42 PM EDT

Friday's Morning Edition on NPR did its best to try to promote the liberal cause of expanding Medicaid in Texas. Wade Goodwyn lined up six soundbites from pro-expansion talking heads, versus only two from former Texas Governor Rick Perry, an opponent. Goodwyn played up that "in hating the Affordable Care Act, the state is leaving on the table as much as a hundred billion dollars of federal money over ten years – money that would pay for health insurance for more than a million of its working poor."

By Tim Graham | April 27, 2015 | 9:58 AM EDT

Former White House press secretary Dana Perino appeared on The Kelly File on Friday night to lament that she shared a touching story about President Bush visiting wounded soldiers in Washington with National Public Radio, but they edited out a family who was overjoyed to see the president, choosing to focus just on an angry mother who was mad at Bush. "Why are your children okay, but my son is here?"

By Tim Graham | April 19, 2015 | 6:11 PM EDT

Most Americans can see there is a vast difference between a time in America where racist mobs lynched innocent black men, and today. But NPR is full of liberals who like to engage in the slur that nothing has changed in American race relations. Now, apparently, the racist mobs are the police.

On Friday’s Morning Edition, NPR did a story on the revival of anti-lynching plays in the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Walter Scott.

By Tim Graham | April 17, 2015 | 11:30 AM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep interviewed presidential candidate Marco Rubio for Tuesday’s program,and like Jake Tapper on his CNN show Tuesday, threw hardballs at Rubio for being in the wrong side of the polls on gay marriage. (Recent polls are showing about 60 percent in favor, 35 percent opposed).

But Inskeep demonstrated a liberal swagger by suggesting social conservatives no longer had a leg to stand on:

By Tim Graham | February 18, 2015 | 10:59 PM EST

Although a Texas judge issuing an injunction against Obama’s “executive action” on illegal immigrants came late Monday, national newspapers all put that ruling on the front page on Wednesday. Some headlines buried the judge. USA Today had “Obama immigration plan blocked.” The Wall Street Journal ran with “Obama Dealt Setback on Immigration.” None of the headlines mentioned “illegal” immigrants.

USA Today’s entire nine-paragraph story avoided the “I-word,” using “undocumented immigrants” four times, and “migrants” once. NPR scrubbed the word "illegal" in favor of "unauthorized" immigrants.

By Tim Graham | January 28, 2015 | 2:11 PM EST

The liberals at NPR weren't sugar-coating their view of  how conservative Republicans will lead their party into a "disastrous" end if they do well in Iowa. On Monday's Morning Edition, NPR analyst Cokie Roberts insisted Iowa Republicans seem to favor social conservatives who push the GOP too far to the right in a general election. They oppose gay marriage and "turn off young voters in droves" and oppose amnesty for immigrants, which has made Rep. Steve King's name "toxic" among Hispanics.

By Tim Graham | January 22, 2015 | 11:34 AM EST

There wasn’t a lot of fact-checking of Obama’s State of the Union address, but NPR promised they would be eyeing the factual claims. In a ten-minute segment on Wednesday's Morning Edition, they investigated claims they insisted what Obama said was “true,” if a matter of political dispute.

But in "fact-checking" Sen. Joni Ernst's GOP response, NPR's Scott Horsley played a slippery game with the estimates of jobs created by the Keystone pipeline proposal.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | December 30, 2014 | 10:26 PM EST

In the fall of 2007, President Bush offered an interview on race relations to National Public Radio correspondent Juan Williams, but NPR declined the invitation. Ellen Weiss, the news boss at the time (who was deposed in the controversy after she fired Williams three years later), demanded that an NPR anchor do the interview. The Williams interview with the president aired on Fox News, and not on NPR.

That sense of feisty independence does not extend to President Obama. When he grants an interview to an NPR anchor, it has all the dramatic tension and hostility of a cappuccino klatch with the D.C. Young Democrats.