Media Scandals

By Tom Blumer | November 18, 2014 | 12:27 PM EST

Two cheers — and two cheers only — for the National Journal's Ron Fournier.

On Fox News's Special Report with Bret Baier last night, the former Associated Press Washington Bureau chief observed that the Jonathan Gruber videos about how the Affordable Care Act was dishonestly written and promoted, as well as President Barack Obama's reaction to those revelations, demonstrate that he (Obama) "has destroyed the credibility of his administration, himself, and government itself." Fine. But then, imitating the naive lover who won't give up despite constant betrayal in the hit song "I Can't Let Go," Fournier stated that he "would like to see this bill work." 

By Tom Blumer | November 12, 2014 | 12:42 AM EST

If Jonathan Gruber, the Obama administration and the establishment press thought that Gruber's faux mea culpa appearance on MSNBC Tuesday afternoon would get them off the hook and avoid the need to deal with and cover the Obamacare architect's exposure of the left's mendacity, they were sadly mistaken.

There's yet another damning "stupid voters" video. Megyn Kelly was all over it Tuesday night, exposing the defiantly silent White House's and others' former financial and emotional love for and dependence on the MIT economist's work.

By Matthew Balan | October 20, 2014 | 12:43 PM EDT

On Monday, the AP's David Bauder spotlighted the ongoing controversy over NBC's Dr. Nancy Snyderman breaking her own quarantine, after she returned from West Africa to cover the Ebola outbreak. Bauder underlined that Synderman's "the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor," and added that "NBC must now decide whether Snyderman's credibility is too damaged for her to continue reporting on Ebola or other medical issues."

By Matthew Balan | October 16, 2014 | 6:14 PM EDT

TVNewser's Chris Ariens spotlighted in a Thursday post how the anchors and crew at CNN's New Day possibly had a little too much fun. Network senior producer John Griffin uploaded a picture of the morning show cast on Twitter sitting at their desk. Two unidentified men in medical scrubs with full face shields stood behind Alisyn Camerota, who is smiling; Chris Cuomo, is who covering his face with both hands; and Michaela Pereira, who appears to be horrified by the suited personnel.

By Matthew Balan | September 24, 2014 | 12:43 PM EDT

CNN President Jeff Zucker is standing by Fareed Zakaria, despite new allegations that the host plagiarized in multiple venues. On Wednesday, Hadas Gold of Politico reported Zucker's Tuesday comments about Zakaria: "We continue to have complete confidence in Fareed." Gold noted that "when pressed further if that meant Zakaria would continue appearing on CNN, Zucker repeated that they have complete confidence in the host."

By Tim Graham | September 20, 2014 | 10:35 PM EDT

The bloggers at Our Bad Media embarrassed CNN host Fareed Zakaria host again with some more obvious examples of Zakaria shamelessly, blatantly borrowing other people’s work – in this case on the airwaves of CNN. They brought 26 examples.

A cable-news blogger said CNN trying to blow this off is "unsustainable."

By Tom Blumer | August 18, 2014 | 3:01 PM EDT

Boy, it's a good thing that we don't have any bloggers, Twitter amateurs or Facebook fulminators going off half-cocked and helping people find out where Darren Wilson lives. Wilson is the Ferguson, Missouri police officer who reportedly shot and killed Mike Brown. I mean, if anybody knew that or could figure it out, his safety and that of any family members would be in jeopardy.

Oh, wait a minute. The New Media newbies to (please bow) "journalism" haven't had to lift a finger to do that, because supposedly responsible journalists have done it all for them (bolds are mine; links are in original):

By Tom Blumer | July 13, 2014 | 9:18 PM EDT

Well, this explains a lot.

A Justin Lynch column ("Wartime Press") originally posted at the Weekly Wonk and republished at Time.com with a more foreboding title ("Bloggers, Surveillance and Obama’s Orwellian State") really ends up being an attempted justification by those Lynch quoted for having a close alliance between the government and "journalists" with "professional standards." Thom Shanker, the Pentagon correspondent for the New York Times, gets the award for the most Orwellian quote in the litter, which will come after the jump. Its prelude is his belief that "The government really needs to get its message out to the American people, and it knows that the best way to do that is by using the American news media." Excerpts follow.

By Tom Blumer | February 25, 2014 | 11:57 PM EST

At the Associated Press on Friday, Chris Tomlinson wrote a story of national significance ("State officials investigating Democratic activists") which the wire service appears not to have ever carried at its national site.

It is nationally significant because the establishment press, both in print and over the airwaves, has chosen to make the Lone Star State gubernatorial candidacy of Democrat Wendy Davis a national matter. However, continuing a pattern going back several months (examples here and here), when negative matters relating to her campaign or to those assisting it surface, all of a sudden we're supposed to believe nobody outside of Texas cares.

By Tom Blumer | February 23, 2014 | 11:58 PM EST

In a lengthy item "as told to Joe Hagan" at NYMag.com's The Vulture, actor, commercial pitchman, and brief MSNBC host Alec Baldwin makes it very clear that he is fed up with a lot of things.

There is plenty of material for discussion in his writeup. I want to focus on what he sees as his mistreatment at the hands of MSNBC and the self-described "progressive" community. Unfortunately, after said mistreatment, it's clear that he still doesn't get the difference between legitimate if strident criticism and expressions of over-the-top hatred, as the excerpts which follow will show (bolds are mine):

By Ken Shepherd | December 19, 2013 | 6:23 PM EST

While many in the liberal media are cheering A&E's decision to suspend Phil Robertson from further filming of the network's Duck Dynasty reality show, MSNBC's Thomas Roberts suggested that the move by the network may not be "enough."

In a Facebook post, the openly gay MSNBC Live host posed to his fans the "big question" of the day (screen capture below page break):

By NB Staff | December 5, 2013 | 12:29 PM EST

To date, NBC/Comcast has made absolutely no apology to its viewers or to Gov. Sarah Palin for Martin Bashir’s vile screed on November 15 suggesting that she should be forced to consume excrement. Even following Bashir’s own apology and subsequent resignation, NBC/Comcast’s top executives have remained completely silent.

MSNBC President Phil Griffin offered only public support for Bashir, releasing a statement yesterday that said in part, “I understand his decision and I thank him for three great years with MSNBC. Martin is a good man and respected colleague – we wish him only the best.” Media Research Center President Brent Bozell reacted: