Media Scandals

By Kyle Drennen | November 25, 2013 | 2:52 PM EST

In an article for MediaBistro's TVNewser blog on Monday, Gail Shister ripped into NBC News for the lack of punishment of MSNBC host Martin Bashir after his vicious and disgusting attack on Sarah Palin: "It's no surprise that NBC tries to distance itself publicly from its corporate sibling. In this case, however, its silence has been deafening. How low does the bar have to go before Tom Brokaw speaks up, as he has in the past? More to the point, why haven't any NBC women taken a stand?"

Earlier in the piece, Shister looked at "MSNBC's long history of Foot in Mouth disease" involving its hosts making offensive remarks about public figures and observed: "In every case, the commentator was either suspended or fired. In every case, the perps have been men, and in every case but one, the broadcast slurs have been aimed at women."

By Tim Graham | November 5, 2013 | 11:30 AM EST

AP media reporter David Bauder seems shocked that CBS would exclude Dan Rather from their gaudy 50th anniversary coverage of JFK’s assassination, “further proof of the lingering bitterness following Rather's messy exit and subsequent lawsuit against the network.”

The same man who thinks he’s never been wrong about the phony documents he launched against George W. Bush announced "I held off doing anything for anybody else for a while, thinking I may be asked to do something (for CBS)...I can't say I had any reason for that hope.” Rather’s delusional enough to think CBS can’t put a dent in his golden reputation with the American people:

By Tom Blumer | October 4, 2013 | 2:28 PM EDT

(UPDATE: See Chad's response to Washington Post's Sarah Kliff at the end of this post.) If what Reason's Peter Suderman is reporting is correct — and he certainly appears to have done the kind of digging you would expect conscientious journalists to do — the establishment press's lionization of Chad Henderson the Fantabulous Obamacare Enrollee is about to fall apart.

Suderman spoke at length with Chad Henderson's father, Bill Henderson, and uncovered a litany of contradictions, inconsistencies, and what should have been red flags to journalists who apparently decided that the story was too good to check (links are in original; bolds are mine):

By Ken Shepherd | September 11, 2013 | 6:08 PM EDT

"[T]his might be one of the most “epic” fails in recent memory," Mediaite's Andrew Kirell noted as he opened up his noontime post about how a graphics glitch at Esquire's website mashed up a photo of a man falling to his death from the World Trade Center with the headline "Making Your Morning Commute More Stylish."

While, "clearly, Esquire did not mean to do this on purpose," it seems the magazine is not exactly falling over itself with effusive apologies. "The magazine tweeted out that the image was due to a 'stupid technical glitch.' They kinda-sorta 'apologized' for any confusion," Kirell noted, embedding the magazine's apology:

By Tom Blumer | August 27, 2013 | 4:02 PM EDT

Based on a review of the archive at Media Bistro's Evening News Category, NBC's Nightly News has just turned in its lowest consecutive two weeks of ratings in over six years. You'd never know that from reading Chris Ariens's narrative at today's ratings post there.

The Big 3 networks combined also failed to break 20 million during both the week of August 12 (19,859,000) and August 19 (19,994,000). That's probably not unprecedented, but it's definitely a rarity.

By Tom Blumer | August 11, 2013 | 2:06 PM EDT

Just before Christmas last year, the Journal News in New York's Westchester County north of New York City published maps containing "the addresses (and names) of all pistol permit holders in Westchester and Rockland counties," and announced their intention to add Putnam County. A firestorm of outrage ensued, but the stubborn paper's operators held out for almost four weeks before finally pulling the maps — but "somehow" allowed the raw data to get out (more on that later). In the interim, there were reports that criminals had begun using the maps to target homes to rob, and that prison inmates were threatening prison guards identified as gun owners.

On Wednesday, Journal News competitor the Rockland County Times reported that an editor involved in the story and over two dozen others had been laid off as part of a nationwide cost-cutting move by Journal News parent Gannett (bolds are mine; HT to BearingArms.com via Instapundit, Doug Powers at Michelle Malkin's place, and Ace):

By Tim Graham | June 17, 2013 | 4:01 PM EDT

It’s official: the Hollywood elite has zero moral authority in attacking sexual abuse of minors that occurred decades ago in the Catholic Church. This weekend, the voters of the Daytime Emmy awards granted three Emmys to Clash, including the trophy for Outstanding Performer In a Children’s Series to Kevin Clash, recently accused of serial sexual pursuit of teenaged boys.

AP reported it, and recycled the claim: “Clash's lawyer has said that related lawsuits filed against the entertainer are without merit.” They quoted no one attacking the Emmy voters or Clash for their lack of morality.

By Tim Graham | June 17, 2013 | 10:41 AM EDT

Apparently, it’s lucrative work to be “entrusted to safeguard the president’s image and legacy.” The Washington Post “Reliable Source” gossips Monday reported that White House spinner Dan Pfeiffer has bought an almost-million-dollar penthouse condo.

Of course, in another cozy exchange between liberal elites, Pfieffer is buying the swanky condo from a senior correspondent and associate editor at the Post:

By Noel Sheppard | May 22, 2013 | 4:19 PM EDT

The perilously liberal Huffington Post just can't stand the idea that it could possibly agree with Fox News.

On Wednesday, the Post published the following headline at its front page: "OH NO: Fox News Is RIGHT!"

By Ken Shepherd | May 21, 2013 | 6:27 PM EDT

When a major journalist breaks a gun law in the nation's capital on national TV in front of hundreds of thousands of viewers at home, you'd think it would be pretty much an open-and-shut case to prosecute. But when Meet the Press host David Gregory did just that last December -- displaying on-air an empty 30-round magazine during an interview segment with the NRA's Wayne LaPierre -- he got off scot-free when the District of Columbia failed to prosecute. The relevant law on the books in the nation's capital calls for a $1,000 fine and a year in prison for any civilian who possesses a ammunition magazine that can hold more than 10 rounds.

Two months later, annoyed with the District of Columbia for failing to answer her questions pertaining to the case, pro-gun rights opinion columnist Emily Miller of the Washington Times filed a freedom of information request. On Friday, Miller updated readers by noting how the District has been stringing her and other conservative bloggers along when it came to producing documents related to the Gregory investigation (emphasis mine):

By Tom Blumer | May 13, 2013 | 11:00 AM EDT

It says something about the seriousness of the rest of the news during the past several days when a story about unethical spying by reporters working for a company founded and built by the current mayor of New York City barely makes a ripple.

It has been alleged, and now admitted, that Bloomberg reporters monitored terminal login activity to develop stories about possible Wall Street executive departures before anyone else outside the entities involved knew and for other news-gathering purposes. The practice appears to go back to when Gotham Mayor Michael Bloomberg was still at the helm of Bloomberg LP, as seen in the bolded sections in the excerpt from a Saturday CNBC news story which follows the jump:

By NB Staff | April 18, 2013 | 12:57 PM EDT

Yesterday 72 congressmen sent letters to the executives at the news divisions of ABC, CBS, and NBC expressing that they were "profoundly appalled" at the broadcast networks censoring the Kermit Gosnell murder trial and the official testimony by a Planned Parenthood representative in Florida opposing a law to stiffen criminal penalties on abortionists who fail to provide medical care to babies who survive abortion attempts.