Media Scandals

By Tom Blumer | January 12, 2015 | 3:19 PM EST

On Saturday, in a post titled "Political Correctness Kills in Paris, Terrifies Media," Jeffrey Lord at NewsBusters cited how the New York Times, in covering the Charlie Hebdo massacre, deliberately changed a story subject's quote from what it originally reported.

This post will show how the message massagers at the Times subsequently went another step further, attempting to convince readers that the subject's statement quoted elsewhere isn't what she said.

By Tom Blumer | December 28, 2014 | 9:52 AM EST

In St. Louis County, police have arrested 19 year-old Joshua Williams and charged him (HT Gateway Pundit) with committing "1st degree arson, 2nd degree burglary and misdemeanor theft" at the QuikTrip convenience store in Berkeley, Missouri on Christmas Eve. Williams "has confessed to the crimes."

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch gets today's prize for most absurd headline, as seen after the jump (bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Tom Blumer | December 22, 2014 | 10:46 AM EST

Amazon founder and current Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos must be quite relieved that he passed on investing millions in Ezra Klein's pet project.

Klein, the infamous founder and coordinator of the left-driven news-managing and manipulation effort known as JournoList, wanted the Post to invest $10 million in what the New York Times described early this year as "a new website dedicated to explanatory journalism on a wide range of topics beyond political policy." Klein, after instead finding a home at leftist online empire Vox Media, started up Vox.com, which has become an ongoing embarrassment of epic proportions. What follows is the latest example, tweeted by the founder himself (HT Twitchy):

By Ann Coulter | December 18, 2014 | 5:07 PM EST

In response to the total implosion of Rolling Stone's preposterous story about a fraternity gang-rape at the University of Virginia, the media have reverted to their Soviet-style reporting. They're not even saying: We're choosing not to talk about UVA because it's a side show. It's more like: UVA? That's a school? Not only did the UVA gang rape turn out to be a hoax, but then President Obama's own Department of Justice completed a six-year study on college rape, and it turns out that instead of 1-in-5 college coeds being raped, the figure is 0.03-in-5.

By Tom Blumer | December 11, 2014 | 1:09 PM EST

Two recent items in the Washington Post support my contention that the establishment press is currently doing more than anyone besides Lena Dunham and "Jackie," both of whom have been irrefutably exposed as rape story fabulists, to cause victims of sexual assault to be reluctant to come forward (Note: That's not to say that the two women haven't been victims of sexual assault, "only" that the stories they are currently promulgating cannot possibly be true).

As Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted this morning, the Post provided feminist character witnesses supporting Dunham (including one who still "completely believe(s) her") and made pathetic excuses for the "Girls" star, including that she has a "demanding job." Meanwhile — and to be clear, this is appropriate work which Rolling Stone should have done in the first place — the Post has been thoroughly vetting the story of alleged University of Virginia fraternity gang-rape victim "Jackie."

By Ann Coulter | December 10, 2014 | 9:44 PM EST

Sorry this column is late. I got raped again on the way home. Twice. I should clarify -- by "raped," I mean that two seductive Barry White songs came on the radio, which, according to the University of Virginia, constitutes rape.

By Tom Blumer | December 7, 2014 | 10:35 AM EST

In the Rolling Stone-University of Virginia fraternity gang-rape saga, National Review's Jonah Goldberg's journalistic instincts expressed in his December 1 Los Angeles Times column ("Rolling Stone rape story sends shock waves -- and stretches credulity") obviously ran circles around Los Angeles Times op-ed columnist Diana Crandall's.

On December 3, shortly before the story imploded, Crandall went after Goldberg with a vengeance for supposedly "being out of touch with college realities" and for writing the kind of column which "prevents rape victims from coming forward" (bolds and numbereed tags are mine):

By Curtis Houck | December 6, 2014 | 1:40 AM EST

When the now-retracted article by the Rolling Stone magazine was published on November 19 about a brutal gang rape of a first-year student at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia, the major broadcast networks rushed to the story and devoted multiple segments to both the article and reaction on the school’s campus. In doing so, they failed (unlike other outlets) to point out its flaws that brought an apology from the liberal magazine on Friday afternoon after it came to realize that many of the key facts in the story were in serious doubt.

By Matthew Balan | December 5, 2014 | 4:19 PM EST

Rolling Stone managing editor Will Dana issued a statement on Friday about their much-publicized "A Rape on Campus" story, which zeroed in on an allegation of gang rape at the University of Virginia by a woman named "Jackie." Dana acknowledged that "there now appear to be discrepancies in Jackie's account," and continued that "we have come to the conclusion that our trust in her was misplaced....We are taking this seriously and apologize to anyone who was affected by the story."

By Kyle Drennen | December 3, 2014 | 3:24 PM EST

After a two-month leave of absence following her violation of an Ebola quarantine, NBC's chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman returned to the network with an appearance on Wednesday's Today and finally took personal responsibility for her actions: "I'm very sorry for not only scaring my community and the country, but adding to the confusion....I stepped outside the boundaries of what I promised to do and what the public expected of me. And for that, I'm sorry."

By Tom Blumer | November 30, 2014 | 11:56 PM EST

The establishment press's performance in Ferguson has certainly been disgraceful, especially its role in turning one local death into a national obsession.

One element of that buildup involves Shawn Parcells, one of two men hired by the family of Michael Brown, the 18 year-old man who was killed in an altercation with Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in early August, to look into his death. The press, including CNN in a video seen here, has reported much of what Parcells has claimed throughout the case with little if any skepticism, permanently poisoning the well with non-factual and doubt-inducing information feeding the left's insatiable desire for proof of incurable racism in law enforcement and America in general.

By Ken Shepherd | November 18, 2014 | 5:36 PM EST

MSNBC is no stranger to guest panelists from the New York Times, but don't expect Times writer Russ Buettner to appear on the network's air anytime soon as Mr. Buettner gave readers of the November 18 paper a look at how "Questions About [Rev. Al] Sharpton’s Finances Accompany His Rise in Influence."