Media Scandals

By Tom Blumer | August 18, 2014 | 3:01 PM EDT

Boy, it's a good thing that we don't have any bloggers, Twitter amateurs or Facebook fulminators going off half-cocked and helping people find out where Darren Wilson lives. Wilson is the Ferguson, Missouri police officer who reportedly shot and killed Mike Brown. I mean, if anybody knew that or could figure it out, his safety and that of any family members would be in jeopardy.

Oh, wait a minute. The New Media newbies to (please bow) "journalism" haven't had to lift a finger to do that, because supposedly responsible journalists have done it all for them (bolds are mine; links are in original):

By Tom Blumer | July 13, 2014 | 9:18 PM EDT

Well, this explains a lot.

A Justin Lynch column ("Wartime Press") originally posted at the Weekly Wonk and republished at Time.com with a more foreboding title ("Bloggers, Surveillance and Obama’s Orwellian State") really ends up being an attempted justification by those Lynch quoted for having a close alliance between the government and "journalists" with "professional standards." Thom Shanker, the Pentagon correspondent for the New York Times, gets the award for the most Orwellian quote in the litter, which will come after the jump. Its prelude is his belief that "The government really needs to get its message out to the American people, and it knows that the best way to do that is by using the American news media." Excerpts follow.

By Tom Blumer | February 25, 2014 | 11:57 PM EST

At the Associated Press on Friday, Chris Tomlinson wrote a story of national significance ("State officials investigating Democratic activists") which the wire service appears not to have ever carried at its national site.

It is nationally significant because the establishment press, both in print and over the airwaves, has chosen to make the Lone Star State gubernatorial candidacy of Democrat Wendy Davis a national matter. However, continuing a pattern going back several months (examples here and here), when negative matters relating to her campaign or to those assisting it surface, all of a sudden we're supposed to believe nobody outside of Texas cares.

By Tom Blumer | February 23, 2014 | 11:58 PM EST

In a lengthy item "as told to Joe Hagan" at NYMag.com's The Vulture, actor, commercial pitchman, and brief MSNBC host Alec Baldwin makes it very clear that he is fed up with a lot of things.

There is plenty of material for discussion in his writeup. I want to focus on what he sees as his mistreatment at the hands of MSNBC and the self-described "progressive" community. Unfortunately, after said mistreatment, it's clear that he still doesn't get the difference between legitimate if strident criticism and expressions of over-the-top hatred, as the excerpts which follow will show (bolds are mine):

By Ken Shepherd | December 19, 2013 | 6:23 PM EST

While many in the liberal media are cheering A&E's decision to suspend Phil Robertson from further filming of the network's Duck Dynasty reality show, MSNBC's Thomas Roberts suggested that the move by the network may not be "enough."

In a Facebook post, the openly gay MSNBC Live host posed to his fans the "big question" of the day (screen capture below page break):

By NB Staff | December 5, 2013 | 12:29 PM EST

To date, NBC/Comcast has made absolutely no apology to its viewers or to Gov. Sarah Palin for Martin Bashir’s vile screed on November 15 suggesting that she should be forced to consume excrement. Even following Bashir’s own apology and subsequent resignation, NBC/Comcast’s top executives have remained completely silent.

MSNBC President Phil Griffin offered only public support for Bashir, releasing a statement yesterday that said in part, “I understand his decision and I thank him for three great years with MSNBC. Martin is a good man and respected colleague – we wish him only the best.” Media Research Center President Brent Bozell reacted:

By Kyle Drennen | December 5, 2013 | 11:43 AM EST

After Martin Bashir announced his resignation from MSNBC on Wednesday following his vile attack on Sarah Palin, NBC, ABC, and CBS refused to make any mention of his disgraceful exit. The networks had already skipped any mention of his wildy offensive November 15 rant calling for Palin to be urinated and defecated on.

As Media Research Center deputy research director Geoff Dickens reported early Wednesday – just hours before Bashir's resignation – such a media blackout stood in stark contrast to the two-week period after Rush Limbaugh called left-wing activist Sandra Fluke a "slut" in early 2012, prompting 32 network segments lambasting Limbaugh for the comments and even demanding that advertisers pull their sponsorship of his nationally syndicated radio show.

By NB Staff | December 4, 2013 | 4:36 PM EST

On November 15, NewsBusters posted a video of MSNBC host Martin Bashir’s disgusting remarks that former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin should be the victim of a particularly vile slave-era punishment – specifically that she should be forced to consume excrement. The video went viral, and today a disgraced Bashir announced his resignation from the Comcast-owned cable "news" network.

This afternoon, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell issued the following statement in reaction:

By Kyle Drennen | November 25, 2013 | 2:52 PM EST

In an article for MediaBistro's TVNewser blog on Monday, Gail Shister ripped into NBC News for the lack of punishment of MSNBC host Martin Bashir after his vicious and disgusting attack on Sarah Palin: "It's no surprise that NBC tries to distance itself publicly from its corporate sibling. In this case, however, its silence has been deafening. How low does the bar have to go before Tom Brokaw speaks up, as he has in the past? More to the point, why haven't any NBC women taken a stand?"

Earlier in the piece, Shister looked at "MSNBC's long history of Foot in Mouth disease" involving its hosts making offensive remarks about public figures and observed: "In every case, the commentator was either suspended or fired. In every case, the perps have been men, and in every case but one, the broadcast slurs have been aimed at women."

By Tim Graham | November 5, 2013 | 11:30 AM EST

AP media reporter David Bauder seems shocked that CBS would exclude Dan Rather from their gaudy 50th anniversary coverage of JFK’s assassination, “further proof of the lingering bitterness following Rather's messy exit and subsequent lawsuit against the network.”

The same man who thinks he’s never been wrong about the phony documents he launched against George W. Bush announced "I held off doing anything for anybody else for a while, thinking I may be asked to do something (for CBS)...I can't say I had any reason for that hope.” Rather’s delusional enough to think CBS can’t put a dent in his golden reputation with the American people:

By Tom Blumer | October 4, 2013 | 2:28 PM EDT

(UPDATE: See Chad's response to Washington Post's Sarah Kliff at the end of this post.) If what Reason's Peter Suderman is reporting is correct — and he certainly appears to have done the kind of digging you would expect conscientious journalists to do — the establishment press's lionization of Chad Henderson the Fantabulous Obamacare Enrollee is about to fall apart.

Suderman spoke at length with Chad Henderson's father, Bill Henderson, and uncovered a litany of contradictions, inconsistencies, and what should have been red flags to journalists who apparently decided that the story was too good to check (links are in original; bolds are mine):

By Ken Shepherd | September 11, 2013 | 6:08 PM EDT

"[T]his might be one of the most “epic” fails in recent memory," Mediaite's Andrew Kirell noted as he opened up his noontime post about how a graphics glitch at Esquire's website mashed up a photo of a man falling to his death from the World Trade Center with the headline "Making Your Morning Commute More Stylish."

While, "clearly, Esquire did not mean to do this on purpose," it seems the magazine is not exactly falling over itself with effusive apologies. "The magazine tweeted out that the image was due to a 'stupid technical glitch.' They kinda-sorta 'apologized' for any confusion," Kirell noted, embedding the magazine's apology: