Media Business

By Kristine Marsh | October 22, 2013 | 2:17 PM EDT

Pepsi and pop stars don’t mix, according to one food police group.

The D.C.-based Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) ran a full page “open letter” in Variety, telling pop singer Katy Perry to stop her work with Pepsi, on account of her influencing young fans. CSPI warned Perry that, “Soda companies are using you and other celebrities.” The letter then bashed her for not caring about her fans. ‘‘Drink Pepsi and you can be cool like Katy Perry’ is the takeaway message for your young fans. ‘Live for now’ – and worry about the health consequences later.” The letter ended by urging her not to “exploit that popularity by marketing a product that causes disease in your fans.”

By Tim Graham | October 19, 2013 | 4:11 PM EDT

CBS This Morning brought on New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson on Friday with all the honors, with Charlie Rose lauding her for leading her paper to four Pulitzer Prizes this year as “the first female” in the top job, and asking her how she’d put an “Abramson imprint” on the paper. But the interesting part came later.

Abramson agreed with her reporter David Sanger that the Obama administration is worse than the much-criticized Bush administration when it comes to cracking down on reporters seeking interviews with government sources. It was almost funny, as three different CBS hosts asked the question, like they could not accept the answer:         

By Noel Sheppard | October 12, 2013 | 11:14 AM EDT

"With magazines, with movies, it’s always weird when things are targeted for young people yet they’re driven by people that are like 40 years too old. It can’t be like this 70 year old Jewish man that doesn’t leave his desk all day, telling me what the clubs want to hear."

So oddly said Miley Cyrus in an interview with Hunger TV Wednesday:

By Noel Sheppard | October 11, 2013 | 6:14 PM EDT

Faithful NewsBusters readers know that Piers Morgan's ratings at CNN are lousy with him typically getting trounced by Sean Hannity on Fox News and Rachel Maddow on MSNBC.

As such, a report by Mediaite's Andrew Kirell Friday regarding the possibility of Morgan losing his 9PM time slot is not at all surprising:

By Tim Graham | October 10, 2013 | 7:02 AM EDT

Two items by Andrew Beaujon at Poynter are interesting when put side by side. At a conference in Cannes, the Guardian reports, BuzzFeed President Jon Steinberg said that “We feel strongly that traditional media have given up on young people” and that news organizations should focus on sharing throughout their processes. They need to stop the old model of "very boring news" geared for Google searches and focus on shares in social media.

So what is the new news that the youngsters under 40 want? Beaujon has the details right below. Joe Veix of Death and Taxes says BuzzFeed "posted essentially the same article" he did without crediting him prominently enough.   His October 2 story was about people tweeting photos of themselves falling down stairs.  

By Noel Sheppard | October 9, 2013 | 4:36 PM EDT

One of the things many conservatives admire about CNN's Jake Tapper is his willingness to speak truths typically too inconvenient for most in his industry.

During an "Ask Me Anything" discussion on Reddit Wednesday, Tapper not only acknowledged the existence of media bias, he also said "White House press briefings are quite often useless":

By Matthew Sheffield | October 7, 2013 | 6:43 PM EDT

Ted Leonsis, the owner of the NBA Washington Wizards as well as the NHL's Washington Capitals took a swipe at the newspaper industry in general and the Washington Post in particular today saying that the Post was "not that important anymore" and that newspapers were based on antiquated business strategies.

Leonsis made those comments in an interview at George Washington University in DC when asked about his thoughts on the newspaper selling out to Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos, as Politico reports:

By Erick Erickson | September 16, 2013 | 11:04 AM EDT

Cross-posted from RedState | Poor Greg Sargent. If it isn’t enough that the DNC has its hand up his posterior controlling him muppet style, he’s all sore over this post of mine pointing out the collaborative nexus between Democrats, liberal groups, and the supposed objective media.

Sargent is convinced —  CONVINCED I tell you — that this is some sort of definitive take down of my post.

By Ken Shepherd | September 13, 2013 | 11:44 AM EDT

"These days, journalists don’t retire, they just join the Obama administration," quipped Ben Jacobs of the Daily Beast in his September 13 post, "From Rick Stengel to David Axelrod, All of the President’s Journalists."

But rather than see a problem with the liberal media-Democratic administration revolving door, Jacobs's story was decidedly matter-of-fact. Indeed, he portrayed it more as the president "reaching out to journalists" rather than servile liberal scribes clamoring to jump aboard the Obama train and being received happily by the administration. What's more, as an excuse that "both sides do it," Jacobs closed by noting that the late Tony Snow is an example of the politics-journalism revolving door being a centuries-old bipartisan tradition:

By Ken Shepherd | September 12, 2013 | 3:34 PM EDT

Updated below page break | Shepard Smith is losing his 7 p.m. Eastern Fox Report slot, but will gain the post of managing editor of the network's breaking news division, Mediaite is reporting. Presumably this opens that time slot for Sean Hannity, who is losing his 9 p.m. slot to Megyn Kelly.

Smith will still retain his 3 p..m. Eastern Studio B program. The Mississippi native is no stranger to NewsBusters criticism. Last August, for example, we criticized Smith for a thinly-veiled swipe at fast-food chain Chick-Fil-A, which was being supported by fans with an "appreciation day" to show support in light of protests by pro-gay marriage groups.

By Ken Shepherd | September 11, 2013 | 6:08 PM EDT

"[T]his might be one of the most “epic” fails in recent memory," Mediaite's Andrew Kirell noted as he opened up his noontime post about how a graphics glitch at Esquire's website mashed up a photo of a man falling to his death from the World Trade Center with the headline "Making Your Morning Commute More Stylish."

While, "clearly, Esquire did not mean to do this on purpose," it seems the magazine is not exactly falling over itself with effusive apologies. "The magazine tweeted out that the image was due to a 'stupid technical glitch.' They kinda-sorta 'apologized' for any confusion," Kirell noted, embedding the magazine's apology:

By Ken Shepherd | September 10, 2013 | 6:08 PM EDT

The liberal website Talking Points Memo [see screen capture below] is accepting and running advertisements for a company called Freak Flags, a California outfit which creates flags designed like the U.S. flag but with the stars in the canton pushed off the side of the blue field, while symbols like the Star of David, Christian cross, or the U.S. dollar sign are emblazoned in the center. The idea of each is a left-wing critique of those who "put Israel first" or "put Jesus first" or "put Wall St. first," respectively.

But a review of the company's website's blog reveals some anti-Semitic rantings regarding the president's call for airstrikes in Syria.