By Tom Johnson | June 19, 2016 | 2:20 PM EDT

A few days ago, Vanity Fair reported that Donald Trump is “considering creating his own media business, built on the audience that has supported him thus far in his bid to become the next president of the United States.” Jonathan Chait thinks such a venture “makes sense” since there’d be a “numerically large” ready-made audience for its fare. “Perhaps [Trump] grasps a truth the official Republican Party has refused to acknowledge: The conservative base is a subculture,” wrote Chait in a Thursday post. “It is a numerically large subculture, but a subculture nonetheless. It rejects the moral values of the larger society and wallows within its own imaginary world."

By Jorge Bonilla | April 28, 2016 | 11:45 PM EDT

No les cae el 20.

By Jorge Bonilla | April 22, 2016 | 5:11 PM EDT

Four things to watch for.

By Curtis Houck | April 11, 2016 | 8:16 PM EDT

Syndicated conservative columnist and Fox News contributor Charles Krauthammer took Donald Trump to task during Monday’s Special Report panel for his long-winded complaints about the delegate selection process with Krauthammer noting that if Trump can’t handle the selection of convention delegates in Colorado, then he might not be able to take on the Chinese.

By Jorge Bonilla | March 17, 2016 | 4:42 PM EDT

Univision's María Elena Salinas gives us some more bellicose rhetoric and CNN rehashes an old narrative.

By Tom Blumer | March 6, 2016 | 12:15 PM EST

Columbia Journalism professor Dale Maharidge has produced a lengthy lament about the state of print and newsroom journalism, and how hard it's been on those forced out of their jobs. It's present online at The Nation, one of the far-left's flagships, and at BillMoyers.com, the web site of the former Johnson administration press secretary. The delusional Moyers believes that "We have an ideological press that's interested in the election of Republicans."

The title of Maharidge's mournful missive at Moyers' site asks a question: "What Happens to Journalists When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore?" The answer, Mr. Maharidge, is that when all of you had the chance, you failed to be reporters, and did so in the name of agenda-driven "journalism." You failed to give the public the basic information it had every right to expect, and in the process frequently demonstrated contempt for your audience. As a result, the public has largely tuned newspapers out, and they're not coming back.

By Jorge Bonilla | February 29, 2016 | 11:53 PM EST

The relationship between Univision and Donald Trump, far from being adversarial, is symbiotic.

By Jorge Bonilla | February 25, 2016 | 3:08 PM EST

Telemundo's María Celeste Arrarás, in an interview with Politico's Hadas Gold, confirms our pre-debate analysis and concerns.

By Cal Thomas | February 10, 2016 | 5:24 PM EST

In a day when the most innocuous thing can quickly become political, a Doritos Super Bowl commercial has upset some people who want abortion to be an unrestricted right.

By Katie Yoder | February 8, 2016 | 2:46 PM EST

Note to NARAL: It’s bad when even the liberal media stop seeing eye-to-eye with you on abortion.

During their Monday broadcast morning news shows, ABC, CBS and NBC reviewed the Super Bowl 50 commercials from the night before. While a pro-choice group erupted over a Doritos “Ultrasound” ad that “humanized fetuses,” the networks heralded it as a “favorite” and online stories found it “hilarious.”

By Ken Shepherd | January 27, 2016 | 7:50 PM EST

"Politics makes strange bedfellows" goes the old saying. In that case, Chris Matthews and Ann Coulter snuggled up under the sheets on tonight's Hardball. After a six-minute roll in the hay – Chris, you stallion! – Matthews thanked Coulter for being on her "best behavior" and gushed that she should come back on air sometime soon.

By Tom Johnson | January 17, 2016 | 11:14 AM EST

Five years ago this month, a great many Tea Party Republicans took office in Congress. For some on the left, however, that may not have been the worst political development of January, 2011. This coming Thursday, notes The Washington Monthly's D.R. Tucker, “marks the fifth anniversary of the bitter night…when progressive Americans, and indeed Americans of all political persuasions who value honor, truth, respect, intelligence and decency, were shocked to learn that MSNBC had decided to end Countdown with Keith Olbermann.”

“What Keith Olbermann did for this country was profound,” declared Tucker in a post last Sunday. “He told the truth…He did more than just live up to the highest standards of American journalism. He did more than just stand up when so many around him stood down. Keith Olbermann kept our democracy safe.”