GQ

By Curtis Houck | December 17, 2014 | 1:21 AM EST

The magazine GQ released its list of the “20 craziest politicians” in the U.S. on Tuesday and, not surprisingly, the liberal publication selected 17 Republicans for the list compared to only three Democrats. 

Among the more prominent Republicans included Senators and possible presidential candidates Rand Paul (Ky.) and Ted Cruz (Texas) as well as incoming Senator Joni Ernst (Iowa). The only three Democrats named to the list were Congressman Hank Johnson (Ga.), Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee (Texas), and Vice President Joe Biden.

By Randy Hall | November 24, 2014 | 7:09 PM EST

It came as no surprise when the occupant of the White House was near the top of GQ magazine's list of “Least Influential People” for the third time in four years. After all, most of the Democratic candidates in the midterm elections pleaded with him not to campaign for them, and the party still lost control of the Senate while Republicans solidified their hold on the House.

“Another year, another round of people who took up vast clouds of oxygen, gave us back nothing of use, and probably helped accelerate the death of our planet,” columnist Drew Magary stated while introducing this year's list. “Here they are, in no particular order, although you'll probably assume we ranked them anyway.”

By Matthew Philbin | November 19, 2014 | 12:29 PM EST

Cut from two NFL teams? Want to be Man of the Year?

By Tim Graham | September 28, 2014 | 9:15 AM EDT

Leftists have an extreme difficulty in differentiating between conservative Christians in the United States and Islamo-fascists in the Middle East. Somehow, letting your traditional religious views affect (infect?) our democracy is akin to beheadings and terrorism.

It's not surprising that this view would come stumbling out of GQ Washington correspondent Ana Marie Cox, one of the flightiest pundits on the left. There it came on Saturday morning's Up With Steve Kornacki on MSNBC. Somehow, the politicians and activists at the Value Voters Summit in Washington sound a lot like ISIS in Syria:

By Tim Graham | March 26, 2014 | 2:59 PM EDT

The Washington Post gossips were "Happy" on Wednesday to report that hot pop star Pharrell can see into the future in an interview with GQ: “And by the way: We're about to have a female president. Hillary's gonna win.”

The Post did not include Pharrell’s trippy pop-star reasoning, including the thought that no female, “no matter how staunch a supporter you are of no-abortion,” will vote against Hillary Clinton or for abortion limits. Try and parse this assault on reason:

By Noel Sheppard | November 24, 2013 | 1:26 PM EST

The news got worse for Barack Obama Sunday: for the second time in three years he made GQ's "Least Influential List."

This time the magazine referred to him as "a very eloquent hat stand":

By Brad Wilmouth | July 2, 2013 | 7:34 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Monday's The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell, Guardian columnist Ana Marie Cox -- formerly of Time.com -- asserted that "a lot of Republican women out there" are upset over the abortion issue because the GOP "is really taking a step backwards when it comes to women's rights."

Below is a transcript of the relevant portion of the Monday, July 1, The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell on MSNBC:

By Ryan Robertson | November 30, 2012 | 6:21 PM EST

How can someone who garnered nearly 60 million votes in a recent presidential election not be considered the least bit influential? As inexplicable as it sounds, that's what GQ Magazine declared when it selected Mitt Romney to headline its annual list of the 25 most uninspiring and insignificant people of the year. According to the author however, they were ranked in no particular order, "because all zeros are created equal."

Seeing a perfect opportunity to have a little fun at the expense of others, the hosts of MSNBC's The Cycle compiled their own list on Thursday. Token conservative S.E. Cupp appeared to have taken the assignment literally with a clip that introduced the world to a mild-mannered man from Indiana. Krystal Ball and Touré Neblett followed, and having some inkling of where their heads were at -- Cupp pleaded with them not to pick her. Instead they chose Karl Rove and Rush Limbaugh respectively, gloating about how wrong they both were about Romney's legitimate chance to emerge victorious.

By Paul Wilson | September 6, 2012 | 3:39 PM EDT

During the first centuries of Christianity, Christians were thrown to lions in arenas to be jeered by mocking crowds. Today, Christian athletes face the taunts of a media strongly opposed to their faith.

No Christian athlete draws more media catcalls than New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow. CBSChicago.com writer Dan Bernstein dismissed Tebow as “little more than an affable simpleton” and slammed his fans as “lunatic-fringe cultists.” Columnist Rabbi Joshua Hammerman of The Jewish Week expressed his desire that Tebow’s Broncos would lose a playoff game because a Broncos victory would “buoy his faithful, and emboldened faithful can do insane things, like burning mosques, bashing gays and indiscriminately banishing immigrants.” Radio host Craig Carton was the latest to jump on the anti-Tebow bandwagon, calling him a “fraud” and complaining that he “clearly thinks he is Jesus” on his August 14 radio show.

By Kelly McGarey | July 25, 2012 | 3:08 PM EDT

If there has ever been any suspicion about which way GQ magazine leans, a new article by Wells Tower puts that to rest. By publishing "Desperately Seeking Mitt," a tear-down piece about the presumptive Republican nominee, the magazine proves that it is solidly Team Obama. Tower, who was assigned to cover Romney on the campaign trail for five months, made his intentions clear: to "follow Governor Mitt "Tin Man" Romney to search for signs of genuine life" and "to spy out those remnants of the candidate's humanity not yet blown to smithereens in the psyops war between the campaign and the press."

Apparently, he was unimpressed with his welcome, and soon concluded that "trying to penetrate the veneer of the Romney brand is like trying to split a billiard ball with a butter knife." In fact, Tower's cynical view of Romney permeates the entire eight-page article. While there are literally dozens of jabs throughout the piece, there are a few glaring instances of bias that cannot be ignored. One particular example is a scathing criticism of Mormonism, saying that its founder Joseph Smith, "despite having some forty wives, still endeavored to f*** everything in sight." 

By Tim Graham | May 31, 2012 | 5:49 PM EDT

The gang at Politico is under fire from liberal friends for a piece by Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei alleging major newspapers have a pro-Obama, anti-Romney bias. For example, Devin Gordon, a former Newsweek writer who's now a "senior editor" at GQ, lamented "The house position of Politico, as evidenced by this piece, is that they are fair and their chief competition is not. It's a thinly disguised, fundamentally craven argument for Politico's superiority in the world of political coverage."

Unsurprisingly, the newspapers claimed they were fair and balanced in the Dylan Byers followup:

By Brent Baker | November 16, 2010 | 2:56 AM EST

Two noteworthy tidbits in a November GQ magazine profile of Obama White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs, an article I stumbled upon while reading the magazine’s look at Washington Capitals hockey star Alex Ovechkin’s summer in Moscow:

While Obama has disdain for the news media, GQ’s Robert Draper discovered the few journalists for whom “Obama does reserve a certain respect,” are liberal columnists Tom Friedman, E.J. Dionne and Joe Klein, as well as David Brooks, the pseudo “conservative” columnist for the New York Times; and ABC’s George Stephanopoulos was amongst those who stepped up to advise Gibbs against taking the roles of both senior adviser and press secretary.