By Clay Waters | June 18, 2016 | 12:18 PM EDT

Showing the continuing conflation of big-time sports journalism and liberal activism, Howard Bryant's “Ali Everlasting” tribute for ESPN Magazine used the boxing legend as a tool to condemn American racism and inequality Meanwhile at Sports Illustrated, lefty journalist Charles Pierce bashed the former Cuban embargo for "shredding" the Cuban economy:

By Tom Johnson | May 30, 2016 | 10:13 PM EDT

Like almost everyone who has the sense God gave geese, Deadspin founder Leitch thinks O.J. Simpson is an unconvicted murderer. Unlike most of those people, Leitch also thinks Simpson’s acquittal “may have been one of the biggest civil-rights victories” of the 1990s. In a New York magazine review of the seven-hour, 43-minute documentary O.J.: Made in America, which airs in five parts next month on ABC and ESPN, Leitch remarked, “The verdict was just cause for all that national celebration from African-Americans, even if [Simpson] was guilty. Shit, especially if he was.”

To Leitch, the acquittal amounted to partial recompense for the black community of Los Angeles, given “the city’s [history of] scabrous racial politics, from the southern blacks who came to Los Angeles expecting acceptance and discovering something far different, to the Watts riots…to former LAPD chief Daryl Gates’s horrific racial attitudes…It all exploded with the Rodney King riots, which were less about King and more about the seeming impossibility that a black man could ever win anything in a court of law in the city of Los Angeles.”

By Clay Waters | May 28, 2016 | 7:07 PM EDT

ESPN Magazine comes with a bonus dose of dubious liberal piety from “The Truth” columnist Howard Bryant, the mag’s moral authority/scold on social issues, especially what he sees as systemic American racism. His latest column is on a familiar topic: the scourge of “authoritarian” patriotism and militarism infecting the ballpark. The subhead: “Why don’t more athletes speak out on behalf of their communities? Perhaps more of them would if there wasn’t a chilling force looming over them.” A chilling force preventing multi-millionaires from speaking their minds?

By Clay Waters | May 15, 2016 | 1:43 PM EDT

The WNBA marks its 20th anniversary this year, and ESPN’s May 23 issue was devoted to wondering why people weren’t watching the games (that the network just happens to air). Magazine columnist (and social justice keyboard warrior) Howard Bryant blamed sexism and racism for the game’s failure to achieve popularity, even roping in the civil rights movement and the history of American inequality: "Six-foot-10 John Isner serves 143 mph. Five-foot-9 Serena does not and never will, which is proof of nothing, another false equivalent in a country built on inequalities."

By Clay Waters | May 5, 2016 | 9:42 AM EDT

ESPN, not content to cover sports, wants in on the burgeoning social-justice market as well. In “Waiting for LeBron," an ESPN magazine essay, Washington Post reporter Eli Saslow pondered why Cleveland Cavaliers basketball legend LeBron James backed off his brief anti-gun activism. Saslow’s histrionic analysis of James “the athlete and the activist” makes it clear that LeBron has (somehow) let both a grieving father and his home city down, by only going halfway in fighting racism and police shootings and gun violence in general, while noting in a single sentence that James, who lives in a gated mansion surrounded by bodyguards, likes to fire guns himself.

By Kyle Drennen | April 21, 2016 | 4:11 PM EDT

On Thursday, both NBC’s Today and ABC’s Good Morning America reveled in ESPN firing baseball analyst Curt Schilling after the former all-star pitcher objected on social media to liberal demands that transgender people be allowed to use whichever bathroom they choose. At the top of Today, co-host Savannah Guthrie announced: “He's out. Former all-star pitcher Curt Schilling fired by ESPN after another controversial post to social media. What he said this time that could cost him his job.”

By Tom Blumer | April 13, 2016 | 10:45 PM EDT

Two writers at the Five Thirty-Eight blog, purchased by ABC's ESPN network two years ago, have done something the crime increase causation deniers will surely detest: demonstrate, based on statistical evidence, and despite their tentative language, that "real changes in the process of policing in Chicago" have led to "spike in gun violence in Chicago since the end of November."

Translating the work of writers Rob Arthur and Jeff Asher into plain English: There has been a clear "Ferguson effect" crime wave in the Second City since the release of the Laquan McDonald video in late November; now the criminals are literally getting away with murder with horrifying frequency (HT Powerline; links are in original; bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Tom Blumer | March 24, 2016 | 1:27 AM EDT

Bob Ley, ESPN's longest-serving commentator, was in Cuba yesterday after the Tampa Bay Rays defeated the island nation's national team 4-1 in an exhibition baseball game.

Shortly after the conclusion of that game, ESPN had Ley report from a rather nice-looking streetscape in Havana (not your typical avenue in the workers' paradise). As he did, a demonstrator interrupted him. ESPN, acting as if it believes it's a sovereign nation unto itself, headlined the incident: "Protester invades SportsCenter in Cuba."

By Bruce Bookter | March 21, 2016 | 11:30 PM EDT

ESPN has had a hoot playing the role of sports Pravda during Barack Obama’s trip to Cuba.

By Bruce Bookter | February 15, 2016 | 10:05 PM EST

The apparent attempt to smear Peyton Manning on his way out the door continued unabated on ESPN’s Around the Horn, Monday afternoon.

By Bruce Bookter | February 14, 2016 | 8:18 AM EST

This year when ESPN decides who should receive their Courage Award, they might want to consider giving it to one of their own.

By Bruce Bookter | February 8, 2016 | 1:26 PM EST

The politically correct, pearl-clutching, metrosexual hot-take machine went full supernova in the aftermath of Sunday’s Super Bowl game as Peyton Manning, deluged with the inevitable questions about whether or not he was going to retire after winning the game, responded with a to-do list that pretty much any normal, red-blooded American male would endorse.