Blogs

By Tom Blumer | April 18, 2015 | 4:59 PM EDT

Time.com's Zeke Miller tweeted yesterday that a "reporter" asked recently declared presidential candidate Marco Rubio of Florida the following question: "Is 43 old enough to be president?" Meanwhile, two weeks ago, a column at Time.com claimed that Hillary Clinton is "biologically primed to be a leader." Seriously.

Since he either can't or won't tell us who asked the question, we're unable to determine if the "reporter" to whom Miller referred was asking the question because he or she doesn't know the Constitution or was trying to bait Rubio into giving an answer implicitly or explicitly criticizing other candidates. It would be worth knowing, because the first answer betrays ignorance, while the second reveals bias and a likely double standard in interviewing. Miller's tweet, which includes Rubio's priceless answer, is after the jump:

By Tom Blumer | April 15, 2015 | 12:19 AM EDT

Hillary Clinton's campaign rollout has been the gaffe machine that keeps on giving. One gaffe in particular was so obvious that it masked an even more ludicrous one.

On Sunday, several people, including yours truly, the Twitter curators at Twitchy, David Knowles at Bloomberg, but almost no one else in the establishment press, noticed that Mrs. Clinton's campaign announcement press release told America that "she's fought children and their families all her career." That gaffe was so glaring that a far worse one which would have led readers to believe that she has fought for them even longer than she has been alive has, from what I can tell, been completely ignored.

By Tom Blumer | April 14, 2015 | 4:13 PM EDT

Journalists' and leftists' (but I repeat myself) misguided love for Cuba goes back decades. Y'know, free healthcare (cough), yada-yada.

Now that President Obama is unilaterally changing the relationship between the two nations, and as usual getting nothing in return, you'd think that they'd be happy. Heck no. It started several months ago when Fox News's Shepard Smith fretted about how a thaw in U.S.-Cuban relations might "ruin the place," and has been echoed in many quarters since then. Early today, CNN International went over the top, essentially communicating in one picture their concern that the changed situation will "ruin" what has already been ruined:

By Tom Blumer | April 13, 2015 | 4:07 PM EDT

Well, this is awkward.

Undermining most of what the business press has done to try to portray the post-recession U.S. economy as performing adequately under President Barack Obama, Bill Daley, Obama’s former chief of staff, told CNBC today that Hillary Clinton "can’t run as the third term of Barack Obama economically," because the recovery has been "uneven" and has only benefited "a small slice" of U.S. households.

By Tom Blumer | April 13, 2015 | 11:36 AM EDT

On Saturday evening (published in print on Sunday), the editorial board at the New York Times had an epic meltdown over the Republican Party's allegedly shabby treatment of President Barack Obama.

Although its title claimed that the GOP had entered "A New Phase in Anti-Obama Attacks," nothing truly new seemed to prompt this rant. Its primary focus was the letter 47 GOP Senators led by Tom Cotton of Arkansas sent to Iran's leaders. But that was a month ago, on March 9. The Times's take on that letter was so embarrassing that it tried to keep curious readers from actually seeing it, forcing them to click through to two other items before deigning to expose them to its almost bland but legally and constitutionally accurate text.

By Tom Blumer | April 13, 2015 | 1:33 AM EDT

With months (really years) to prepare, the allegedly well-oiled Hillary Clinton for President machine still managed to produce a howler of a mistake in her campaign bio's debut. Since corrected, it originally stated that "she's fought children and families all her career."

This and other obvious gaffes are likely destined to go unreported by the Hillary-worshipping establishment press, while the slighest of real or imagined mistakes — up to and including supposedly taking an untimely drink of water — will become media obsessions for the next 19 months.

By Tom Blumer | April 12, 2015 | 8:41 PM EDT

A Wednesday "Good Morning America" piece gave President Barack Obama an open mic to claim that, in ABC's words, "climate change became a personal issue for him when his older daughter Malia, now 16, was rushed to the emergency room with an asthma attack when she was just a toddler."

Somehow, ABC managed to avoid another possible contributor — besides the obvious possibility that Malia developed asthma independent of external influences — namely the President's 30-year smoking habit. He is said to have quit once and for all in 2011. USA Today columnist James S. Robbins wasn't impressed with the President's "reasoning," and with good cause, as he articulated in a Thursday evening column. He even managed to get a "there's been no warming for a long time" observation past USA Today's editors (links are in original; bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | April 12, 2015 | 2:38 PM EDT

Imagine if a Republican or conservative U.S. president told an audience — on foreign soil, no less — that he didn't properly warn Americans about how long it would take for the economy to recover from a recession. "So-and-so Admits He Lied About the Economy" would be headlined everywhere.

At the University of the West Indies in Jamaica on Thursday, President Barack Obama essentially admitted that the he knew that the economic recovery would take far longer than advertised, but chose not to tell us. There's no other way to interpret the following answer to a student's question seen in the video following the jump. But somehow, this isn't news.

By Tom Blumer | April 12, 2015 | 11:33 AM EDT

A Reuters report published late Saturday evening ("Obama meets Venezuela's Maduro at time of high tensions") is astonishing for what it ignores.

The unbylined report from Panama City opens by referring to how "the United States recently placed sanctions on Venezuela." Indeed, President Barack Obama did just that in an executive order on March 9, stating that he was "declaring a national emergency with respect to the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States posed by the situation in Venezuela." But Reuters completely ignored the fact that Obama told the world this week that he didn't mean it.

By Tom Blumer | April 11, 2015 | 9:38 PM EDT

A Friday editorial at the Second Amendment-despising New York Times thought it had caught blatant hypocrisy at the NRA relating to gun-carrying rules at its national convention in Nashville, Tennessee. What was really blatant was the editorial's ignorance and the writers' failure to fact-check.

After getting caught, the Times should have decided to retract the editorial. Of course, that didn't happen. Then, in a pathetic "correction," the Times threw yet another error into the pile.

By Tom Blumer | April 7, 2015 | 2:49 PM EDT

New Republic staff writer Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig has clearly run out of defenses for the conduct of those involved in the disgraceful, scandalous journalistic malpractice which gave rise to the now-retracted and thoroughly discredited "A Rape on Campus: The Struggle for Justice at UVA" at Rolling Stone.

So here's her last refuge: Conservatism deserves some of the blame, because Sabrina Rubin Erdely and others associated with the story supposedly "Used Rightwing Tactics to Make a Leftist Point" (links are in original; bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tom Blumer | April 4, 2015 | 11:28 PM EDT

UPDATE, April 6: An email sent by "Virginia Commonwealth University News" insists, despite the November 2014 tweet originally found at the link about Bryan's "GoFundMe" effort, that Alix Bryan "has not been employed by Virginia Commonwealth University." Accordingly, the text in this post's final sentence now refers to Bryan's claim in her WTVR bio and at her LinkedIn profile to have received a "Master’s in Multimedia Journalism from Virginia Commonwealth University."

Opening up a new frontier in the left's ongoing effort to intimidate opponents into silence, a Virginia TV reporter tweeted on Wednesday that "I have reported the GoFundMe for Memories Pizza for fraud. Just in case." In doing so, social media reporter Alix Bryan of CBS affiliate WTVR-TV in Richmond, Virginia, effectively admitted that she had no factual basis upon which to file such a report — but did so anyway.

To the surprise of very few, after she was publicly criticized for this disgraceful behavior, Bryan went to a wide variety of failed defenses before she ended up very inadequately "apologizing."