Blogs

By Tom Blumer | December 24, 2014 | 10:42 AM EST

When I first read about this, I thought that it had to be some kind of weird spoof. But it's not.

Over the course of almost two excruciatingly tedious minutes complete with ominous piano-dominated background music, a recently created video intended to become a public service announcement (PSA) shows a teenage boy taking a gun out of a drawer in his parents' bedroom and bringing it to school. At the end of a class period, he puts it on the desk of his shocked teacher and asks her, "Can you take this away? I don’t feel safe with a gun in my house."

By Tom Blumer | December 23, 2014 | 10:43 AM EST

Establishment press reporting has all too often been about perpetuating a narrative, even long after it has been proven false, than conveying facts and truth. Anyone arguing that 2014 has been one of the worst years ever for this growing trend won't get an argument here.

An Associated Press poll about the top stories of the year got responses from 85 editors at subscribing AP outlets. Although the top story named wasn't a surprise (disappointing, yes; surprise, no), the way the AP's David Crary wrote it up to support the proven-false "Hands up, don't shoot!" narrative on Monday was absolutely outrageous (bolds and numbered tags):

By Tom Blumer | December 22, 2014 | 10:46 AM EST

Amazon founder and current Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos must be quite relieved that he passed on investing millions in Ezra Klein's pet project.

Klein, the infamous founder and coordinator of the left-driven news-managing and manipulation effort known as JournoList, wanted the Post to invest $10 million in what the New York Times described early this year as "a new website dedicated to explanatory journalism on a wide range of topics beyond political policy." Klein, after instead finding a home at leftist online empire Vox Media, started up Vox.com, which has become an ongoing embarrassment of epic proportions. What follows is the latest example, tweeted by the founder himself (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Blumer | December 20, 2014 | 9:59 AM EST

In discussing a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing announced Wednesday, the New York Daily News carried comments made by Howard Zucker, the state's Health Commissioner, about fracking's impact on public health.

Zucker asked two rhetorical questions: "Would I live in a community with (fracking) based on the facts I have now?" and “Would I let my child play in a school field nearby or my family drink the water from the tap or grow their vegetables in the soil?” His answer: “After looking at the plethora of reports ... no." Cuomo reportedly described Zucker's remarks as “very sobering ... because if the state health commissioner doesn’t want his kids living there, I don’t want my kids living there and I don’t want any New Yorkers’ kids living there." Too bad for the truth that Zucker has no children, and is unmarried. Too bad for New Yorkers unaware of what the Daily News found that the rest of the press will pretend that Zucker's false pose as a family man is unimportant, and won't report it.

By Tom Blumer | December 20, 2014 | 7:49 AM EST

The establishment press is virtually giddy over New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's cowardly, self-serving decision to ban fracking in New York. It's cowardly because Cuomo is publicly pretending that he's only deferring to his environmental and health commissioners, when everyone with an ounce of sense knows that he's getting the recommendations he wanted. It's self-serving because it enhances his political cachet with environmental zealots while disregarding the frightening plight, with the exception of Metro New York City, of the Empire State's seriously decaying economy.

Examples of pathetic press coverage, plus a depressing look at the state's non-New York City job market, follow the jump.

By Tom Blumer | December 18, 2014 | 2:03 PM EST

Those who rail at Fox News for allegedly being a haven of unbridled, uninterrupted conservatism usually and conveniently fail to remember that Shepard Smith is there.

Smith's take yesterday on the potential pitfalls of a thaw in U.S.-Cuba relations, particularly on the commercial front, was nothing short of astonishing. His primary fear, expressed in an interview with Gerri Willis of the Fox Business Network, is that the new arrangements might "ruin the place." It would be "the last thing they need" to see "Taco Bell and Lowes" locations there. Smith also posed as a market analyst, wondering if the Dow was up 300 points because of President Obama's related announcement. Video (HT Mediaite and PJ Media's Ed Driscoll) and a transcript follow the jump:

By Tom Blumer | December 16, 2014 | 11:55 PM EST

Earlier tonight, Curtis Houck at NewsBusters observed that the Tuesday evening network news shows failed to report on an opinion issued today by a federal judge in Western Pennsylvania in connection with President Obama's illegal immigration-related executive actions last month.

Several blogs and center-right outlets noted Judge Arthur Schwab's 38-page "Memorandum Opinion" this afternoon. Not that this excuses the networks, but a search at the Associated Press's national site just before 8 p.m. on Schwab's last name (unfortunately not saved) returned nothing relevant. But shortly after 8 p.m. a story with a time stamp of 5:08 p.m. with Schwab's name finally showed up in the same search. Only the AP can explain how this could have happened.

By Tom Blumer | December 16, 2014 | 5:37 PM EST

In a December 9 article at Politico Magazine, Erica Peterson went after Louisville's "urban heat island" problem, where "a city’s center experiences significantly hotter temperatures than its less-developed surroundings."

In doing so, Peterson rolled out some very questionable statistics. But it's her contention that "As pollution and stagnant air bake in the sun" in the city's heat island, "air quality worsens" that was really over the top. If that statement were true, Louisville's air quality should have deteriorated as its heat island problem has grown. The truth is, as Powerline's Steven Hayward demonstrated yesterday, that the Derby City's air quality has significantly improved.

By Tom Blumer | December 16, 2014 | 1:51 PM EST

Today, the world has learned that terrorists with the Taliban, the group of Islamic fundamentalist jihadists who have rained terror on Afghanistan and Pakistan for nearly two decades, "attacked a school in Peshawar, killing 141 people, 132 of them children." The death toll will almost certainly rise as some of the 114 children the BBC has reported are injured fail to survive.

But don't ask Muslims to condemn this cowardly attack on innocents. If you do, you'll upset Max Fisher at Vox, who just yesterday (HT Twitchy), in exquisite timing, insisted that it's "bigoted and Islamophobic" to expect anything of the sort:

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2014 | 2:33 PM EST

One of the more amusing aspects of observing today's left-biased establishment media environment is seeing agenda-driven journalists directly or indirectly convey a clearly inflated sense of their outlets' self-importance.

A recent example of this came Friday from Jacob Silverman at Politico Magazine. In his writeup on conservative firebrand Charles Johnson, Silverman employed the comparative version of a word - "fringy" - rarely used in the political realm. Silverman described Breitbart and The Blaze as "even fringier" than ... well, let's try to figure that one out.

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2014 | 2:11 AM EST

It's a good thing that establishment press publications like the New York Times have those layers of editors and fact-checkers. They're able to prevent embarrassing things like misstatements of commonly known facts, misidentifications of key parties involved in recent events, and misspellings those sloppy bloggers and new media types routinely publish.

Oh, wait a minute. All three types of errors just occurred in just one New York Times item this weekend. After publishing its original story by Jennifer Steinhauer and Elena Schneider on this Saturday's so-called "Justice For All" March in Washington, which also included coverage of New York's related event, the Times issued a correction which has to be seen to be believed (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Blumer | December 14, 2014 | 10:31 AM EST

Here's a small window into a journalist's mindset.

In a report on how lower gas prices are affecting the companies operating retail gas stations, Associated Press reporter John Fahey revealed his apparent believes that there are millions of us walking around, perhaps including him, obsessed with getting back at gas station owners for charging us so much at fill-up time for years: