Blogs

By Tom Blumer | April 12, 2015 | 8:41 PM EDT

A Wednesday "Good Morning America" piece gave President Barack Obama an open mic to claim that, in ABC's words, "climate change became a personal issue for him when his older daughter Malia, now 16, was rushed to the emergency room with an asthma attack when she was just a toddler."

Somehow, ABC managed to avoid another possible contributor — besides the obvious possibility that Malia developed asthma independent of external influences — namely the President's 30-year smoking habit. He is said to have quit once and for all in 2011. USA Today columnist James S. Robbins wasn't impressed with the President's "reasoning," and with good cause, as he articulated in a Thursday evening column. He even managed to get a "there's been no warming for a long time" observation past USA Today's editors (links are in original; bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | April 12, 2015 | 2:38 PM EDT

Imagine if a Republican or conservative U.S. president told an audience — on foreign soil, no less — that he didn't properly warn Americans about how long it would take for the economy to recover from a recession. "So-and-so Admits He Lied About the Economy" would be headlined everywhere.

At the University of the West Indies in Jamaica on Thursday, President Barack Obama essentially admitted that the he knew that the economic recovery would take far longer than advertised, but chose not to tell us. There's no other way to interpret the following answer to a student's question seen in the video following the jump. But somehow, this isn't news.

By Tom Blumer | April 12, 2015 | 11:33 AM EDT

A Reuters report published late Saturday evening ("Obama meets Venezuela's Maduro at time of high tensions") is astonishing for what it ignores.

The unbylined report from Panama City opens by referring to how "the United States recently placed sanctions on Venezuela." Indeed, President Barack Obama did just that in an executive order on March 9, stating that he was "declaring a national emergency with respect to the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States posed by the situation in Venezuela." But Reuters completely ignored the fact that Obama told the world this week that he didn't mean it.

By Tom Blumer | April 11, 2015 | 9:38 PM EDT

A Friday editorial at the Second Amendment-despising New York Times thought it had caught blatant hypocrisy at the NRA relating to gun-carrying rules at its national convention in Nashville, Tennessee. What was really blatant was the editorial's ignorance and the writers' failure to fact-check.

After getting caught, the Times should have decided to retract the editorial. Of course, that didn't happen. Then, in a pathetic "correction," the Times threw yet another error into the pile.

By Tom Blumer | April 7, 2015 | 2:49 PM EDT

New Republic staff writer Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig has clearly run out of defenses for the conduct of those involved in the disgraceful, scandalous journalistic malpractice which gave rise to the now-retracted and thoroughly discredited "A Rape on Campus: The Struggle for Justice at UVA" at Rolling Stone.

So here's her last refuge: Conservatism deserves some of the blame, because Sabrina Rubin Erdely and others associated with the story supposedly "Used Rightwing Tactics to Make a Leftist Point" (links are in original; bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tom Blumer | April 4, 2015 | 11:28 PM EDT

UPDATE, April 6: An email sent by "Virginia Commonwealth University News" insists, despite the November 2014 tweet originally found at the link about Bryan's "GoFundMe" effort, that Alix Bryan "has not been employed by Virginia Commonwealth University." Accordingly, the text in this post's final sentence now refers to Bryan's claim in her WTVR bio and at her LinkedIn profile to have received a "Master’s in Multimedia Journalism from Virginia Commonwealth University."

Opening up a new frontier in the left's ongoing effort to intimidate opponents into silence, a Virginia TV reporter tweeted on Wednesday that "I have reported the GoFundMe for Memories Pizza for fraud. Just in case." In doing so, social media reporter Alix Bryan of CBS affiliate WTVR-TV in Richmond, Virginia, effectively admitted that she had no factual basis upon which to file such a report — but did so anyway.

To the surprise of very few, after she was publicly criticized for this disgraceful behavior, Bryan went to a wide variety of failed defenses before she ended up very inadequately "apologizing."

By Tom Blumer | April 2, 2015 | 10:41 PM EDT

Update, April 3: The Indiana man who claims to have been hacked now admits that he wasn't, but says he was "joking" about robbing Memories Pizza, and is threatening to sue those who exposed his (ahem) public comments. 

Those of us following the Memories Pizza story won't have trouble remembering it as the years go by, thanks only partially to the Walkerton, Indiana store's fairly unusual name for a pizzeria.

What will also easy to recall are the "memories" of the unhinged and threatening leftist behavior that accompanied its owner's simple statement that, if the request ever arose, they would have to turn down catering a same-sex "marriage" because participating in or supporting such a ceremony violates their firm Christian religious beliefs — and the press's attempts to cover up what their journalistic malfeasance unleashed.

By Tom Blumer | April 1, 2015 | 11:43 PM EDT

Something hasn't seemed right about the Memories Pizza story from the get-go. Now I know why.

In a Tuesday report, TV Station ABC 57 cited the Walkerton, Indiana business's Crystal O'Connor as saying that, in the station's words, they "don't agree with gay marriages and wouldn't cater them if asked to." In other words, they've never been asked to. The non-story which ignited a national firestorm is the result of a dangerously irresponsible ambush. The reporter involved admitted as much in a tweet late this morning:

By Tom Blumer | March 31, 2015 | 11:24 PM EDT

On March 18, Associated Press Religion Writer Rachel Zoll covered the decision by the Presbyterian Church USA (PCUSA) "recognizing gay marriage as Christian in the church constitution after decades of debate over same-sex relationships."

A search at the AP's national site indicates that the wire service hasn't done a story on the U.S. congregation since then. This means that it has ignored a development going at least back to Friday indicating that there has been significant external blowback:

By Tom Blumer | March 31, 2015 | 8:53 PM EDT

The press won't roast New York Governor Andrew Cuomo for this, but it should — at a very high temperature.

Today, Mr. Self-Righteous, who in the past has suggested that anyone who is pro-life, against same-sex marriage, or for the U.S. Constitution's Second Amendment as written and adjudicated should leave his state, banned all "non-essential" state travel to Indiana, home of a recently enacted religious freedom law similar to that found in roughly 19 states — make that soon to be 20, with Arkansas imminently getting on board:

By Tom Blumer | March 31, 2015 | 1:57 PM EDT

So Harry Reid knew he was lying about Mitt Romney not paying taxes for ten years when he made the claim in 2012 from the lawsuit-free zone known as the floor of the U.S. Senate, but didn't care.

That's what one must conclude from Reid's response to CNN's Dana Bash about that statement. Asked on the network's New Day program if he regrets what he said, Reid responded: "Romney didn't win, did he?" Rather than question Reid's outrageously cynical "end justifies the means" mentality, Bash's edited interview moved on to another topic.

By Tom Blumer | March 30, 2015 | 11:14 PM EDT

On Sunday on CNN's State of the Union, Dana Bash, while interviewing Texas Senator and GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz, attempted to compare his alleged lack of experience to that of Barack Obama when he declared his candidacy in 2007.

It did not go well for her. It's a mystery why Bash might have thought that Cruz wouldn't have an answer for her faux concerns, but he did, and he hit her pitches out of the park. Video and a transcript follow the jump.