By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2016 | 11:59 PM EDT

On Fox News shortly after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's foreign policy speech today, former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton evaluated what the GOP frontrunner had to say about Iran's efforts to develop nuclear weapons.

He also stated the inconvenient truth about the Obama administration's nuclear "deal" with Iran, namely that it puts the jihad-driven, terrorist-funding, death-to-America nation "on a highway to nuclear weapons" — a reality that the Barack Obama-defending press simply won't admit, at least partially because elements of the press, particularly alleged "journalists" at the Associated Press, helped clear the route for that highway:

By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2016 | 12:08 PM EDT

Just in time for tomorrow's first-quarter economic growth announcement from the government, Bloomberg Businessweek's Economics Editor is telling readers: "Don't Sweat America's Upcoming Microscopic GDP Growth."

Besides, Peter Coy writes, people need to get used to the supposedly inescapable fact that "Normal growth for the U.S. economy is just a lot lower than it used to be." Americans shouldn't worry, even if tomorrow's GDP figure shows a small contraction (perhaps indicating that Mr. Coy has been tipped to the fact that it will be). The key, the glib Mr. Coy contends, is to understand that "Happiness is all a matter of lowering expectations."

By Tom Blumer | April 25, 2016 | 11:24 PM EDT

State Department spokesman John Kirby did a fist-pounding imitation of Baghdad Bob at a press conference today on the Obama administration's decision "to send 250 more troops to Syria."

Note that the Associated Press report by Kathleen Hennessey linked in the first paragraph refers to "troops," not "advisers" or "trainers." This is important, because that AP report acknowledges that in everyday parlance, the additional forces involved are "boots on the ground." The AP's Matt Lee, one of the few genuine journalists at the wire service, had to endure hearing Kirby say that the administration wasn't changing course or breaking a previous promise. Lee didn't take it well, nor should he have (HT Washington Free Beacon):

By Tom Blumer | April 25, 2016 | 6:25 PM EDT

If what Barack Obama contended in London, England on Saturday was obviously true, I suspect that the establishment press would be broadly proclaiming it and looking back at the President's wonderful work.

What Obama is claiming — that his presidency is responsible for "saving the world economy from a Great Depression" — is nonsense, but he's clearly beginning to lobby for it to become the historical narrative. This may explain why the Associated Press, while running a story on what Obama said, has made it pretty difficult to find. But it will be there for agenda-driven hacks to locate when it becomes time to spin the history. If a Republican or conservative president made such a claim, the fact checkers would already have been out in force.

By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2016 | 11:54 PM EDT

In a Fox News Sunday interview so painful to watch readers are advised to consider taking headache medicine before viewing, Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz tried to make the case that the FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton's handling of emails containing sensitive and classified national security information and her use of an undisclosed private email server is a "distraction," and that the idea of even raising it as a campaign issue is "ludicrous."

Show host Chris Wallace was particularly perturbed when the DNC chair claimed that Mrs. Clinton was "using private e-mail in the same way that previous secretaries of state have," and forced her to admit, "Other than the private server":

By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2016 | 10:02 PM EDT

On Meet the Press today, host Chuck Todd asked Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders what he thought of the idea of a consumption tax on soda. Sanders' answer, laded with his standard "massive wealthy inequality" argument, led Todd to believe that Sanders might also be against cigarette taxes.

No, those taxes are fine, Sanders said, but given that "cigarettes are causing cancer ... and other diseases ... there's almost a question as to why it remains a legal product."

By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2016 | 4:44 PM EDT

Things must be getting grim on the Obamacare front if the Obama administration feels it must send "Zeke the Bleak" Emanuel out to defend it.

Though he was on relatively good behavior compared to previous interviews he has given, Emanuel, rather than visibly losing his cool, kept on using Stuart Varney's first name in his responses during a Fox Business interview this week to the point where it nearly came off as an attempt at parent-child condescension.

By Tom Blumer | April 23, 2016 | 11:56 PM EDT

In an utterly amazing and totally unexpected coincidence, Verizon is reporting that there has been a spike in vandalism and sabotage against its facilities since workers went on strike on April 13. (That's sarcasm, folks.) Paul J. Gough at the Pittsburgh Business Times has reported the company's claim that "there have been more than two dozen cases of what it called sabotage to cables and its facilities in the week since tens of thousands of its employees went on strike."

Some other local TV stations and outlets have also covered the matter, but it's not national news at the Associated Press or other national outlets, even though the wire service has done several stories on the strike, and even though its scope — 39,000 union members in nine states and DC — is hardly inconsequential.

By Tom Blumer | April 23, 2016 | 9:21 PM EDT

On Friday, the New York Daily News broke the news that "The head investigator for the state Board of Elections probed the 2014 fundraising efforts by (New York City) Mayor de Blasio and his team on behalf of the (New York State) Senate Democrats and found enough 'willful and flagrant' violations to warrant a criminal referral to the Manhattan DA’s office."

The story has attracted virtually no national establishment press attention. The New York Times, which seems to have sensed the gravity of the matter in the nick of time, ran an excuse-making pre-emptive Thursday story which appeared on the front page of Friday's print edition. After the Daily News reported the criminal referral recommendation, the Times returned to the matter on Friday evening — and placed their coverage on Page A17 of its Saturday print edition.

By Tom Blumer | April 22, 2016 | 11:59 PM EDT

Americans For Prosperity won a huge court victory in California Thursday against that state's hard-left vindictive attorney general, Kamala Harris. Naturally, the national press is doing what it does when it doesn't want to cover a story: letting the Politico cover it and then pretending that this suffices.

Harris demanded that AFP provides the section of its not-for-profit Federal Form 990 identifying its donors. Anyone with an ounce of sense knows, despite Harris's lip service to confidentiality, that her motivation is to have the names leak out so that donors are subject to the kind of public intimidation to which those who supported the pro-traditional marriage Proposition 8 in California were subjected in 2008. Judge Manuel L. Real in the California District Federal Court forcefully denied that demand (HT Powerline). Deceptive headlines at two of the state's largest newspapers betrayed clear displeasure with the result.

By Tom Blumer | April 22, 2016 | 9:50 PM EDT

Solary energy company SunEdison filed for bankruptcy on Thursday. According to Reuters, the company's stock traded as high as $33.44 in July 2015. The stock closed at 22 cents today. Nine years ago, the company's market value was over $17 billion. According to the Associated Press, in July of last year it was still worth $10 billion.

The losses aren't limited to investors, however, a fact that the establishment press has ignored in its SunEdison bankruptcy reports. As Roberty Bryce detailed at National Review on April 4 when the company's bankruptcy began to appear unavoidable, taxpayers have also seen lots of money go down the drain at SunEdison and another bankrupt renewables company — ten times what was lost in the $500 million Solyndra bankruptcy (bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | April 21, 2016 | 9:18 PM EDT

As the Washington Free Beacon reported today (confirmed here in a chart published two weeks ago), the number of Americans enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), traditionally known as Food Stamps, dropped below 45 million for the first time in almost five years (actually, 57 months) in January.

This is hardly cause for cheer, and does nothing to change the fact that in the vast majority of states, the Food Stamp program has been fundamentally transformed during the past eight years into a guaranteed income program. But to former longtime Washington Post reporter Eric Pianin, who has toiled at The Fiscal Times web site during the past six years, it was cause to go after House-led budget "cuts" and efforts at structural reform in an April 14 report riddled with laziness, errors and bias.