Blogs

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2014 | 2:07 AM EDT

In another development most of the establishment press, with the usual exception of Fox News and the unusual exception of Reuters, has thus far predictably ignored, Santa Barbara County District Attorney Joyce Dudley announced on Friday the indictment of University of California-Santa Barbara Associate Professor Mireille Miller-Young on charges of "theft from a person, battery, and vandalism." The case's first hearing is scheduled for April 4.

To bring those who didn't see your truly's Monday post up to speed: "As seen in a video at the YouTube site of the Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust (warning: profanity), a UCSB assistant professor (MIller-Young) took a sign away from a participant in a campus pro-life outreach effort. Flanked by two students, she took the sign back to her office and destroyed it." Excerpts from the Reuters report by Laila Kearney follow the jump (bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tom Blumer | March 20, 2014 | 5:14 PM EDT

It wouldn't be Saint Patrick's Day in the 21st century U.S. without a parade controversy. As has been the case in Boston for well over 20 years, even after a unanimous Supreme Court decision affirmed the parade sponsors' position in a 1995 ruling, it concerns the exclusion of what the conservative, social values-oriented group Mass Resistance charitably describes as the "gay pride parade" element.

Apparently, the "gay pride" element thought that the arrival of new Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, who replaced Tom Menino after Menino's 21 years at the helm in January, would be their opportunity to intimidate their way into the parade. It didn't work. Of particular note is how aggressive and hostile reporters at both local newspapers, the ultraliberal Globe and the supposedly center-right Herald, were towards the parade's organizers and sponsors (links are in original; some bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | March 19, 2014 | 11:59 PM EDT

Sometimes the saying "better late than never" applies. This isn't one of them.

In a report originally time-stamped on March 18 (HT Sweetness and Light) and revised this afternoon at its national web site, the Associated Press's Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and seven other AP reporters found out that Obamacare is putting the screws to many cancer patients. Of course, they didn't phrase it that way, but that's the primary takeaway from their report. The story's headline was so weak that many readers who saw it on their computers, tablets and smartphones likely blew right past it without clicking through. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds are mine):

By Tom Johnson | March 19, 2014 | 9:05 PM EDT

In a Tuesday post, Daily Kos founder and publisher Markos Moulitsas celebrated the "genuine progress" American liberalism has made over the past ten years, but warned that it still must battle plenty of countervailing forces, including -- yes, NewsBusters readers -- a pro-conservative media.

Kos notes that Democrats now control the Senate, which wasn't the case in 2004, and observes that since then, the party's caucus in the upper chamber "has shifted significantly to the left," given the departure of supposed squishes like Evan Bayh and Tom Daschle as well as the arrival of progressives such as Al Franken and Elizabeth Warren. He also exults that fewer than two dozen Blue Dog Democrats remain in the House of Representatives, making today's House Dems as a group distinctly more liberal than a decade ago.

By Tom Blumer | March 19, 2014 | 11:00 AM EDT

On Wednesday, the Politico's Dylan Byers, imitating the president his web site so loves and adores, unilaterally decided ("new rule") that those of us who are making the self-evident observation that President Barack Obama's foreign policy performance has been weak can't do so unless we articulate what he should be doing.

How quaint. I don't recall seeing, hearing or reading of anyone at Politico or in the rest of the establishment press trying to place such firm conditions on those who opposed the Iraq War or how it was being conducted, the Bush 43 tax cuts, or any other performance, initiative, or idea during the previous presidential administration. Byers' tweet and several choice responses to it follow the jump (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Blumer | March 18, 2014 | 4:16 PM EDT

One of the more annoying aspects of establishment press coverage of many controversial issues is the outlets' tendency to act as if opposition to many things (really almost anything) which advance the left's agenda springs exclusively from Republicans. One obvious example is abortion, as if you can't be pro-life and libertarian or liberal (see: Nat Hentoff).

Another budding example has to do with governance of the Internet. Late Friday afternoon, the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA) announced its "intent to transition key Internet domain name functions" to "the global multistakeholder community." Obviously, there is Republican opposition to this move, but you don't have to be either to be opposed. Predictably, though, Jessica Meyers and Erin Mershon at the Politico headlined ("Defenders of Net transition: GOP off base") and framed their writeup as if that's the case. Excerpts from their report and an an excerpt from a blog post at the nonpartisan Information and Technology Innovation Foundation follow the jump.

By Jeffrey Meyer | March 18, 2014 | 3:24 PM EDT

Irin Carmon, MSNBC.com’s resident abortion reporter penned a misleading piece on March 18 arguing that nuns are split over the contraception mandate in ObamaCare. Carmon, who doesn’t hide her support for “reproductive rights” chose to deceive her readers about a supposed divide within the Catholic Church.

Carmon began her piece by declaring that “What do nuns have to do with birth control? Plenty, if you’re following the battle over the Affordable Care Act’s coverage provisions and the claim that requiring employers to pay for contraceptive coverage violates their religious freedom.”

By Tom Blumer | March 17, 2014 | 7:32 PM EDT

Did you catch the story about the pro-abortion demonstration at the religious college where a pro-life professor grabbed a protester's sign and destroyed it? Of course not, because there's no such story. If it had happened, it would be news, and garner significant attention.

The same thing happened earlier this month at the University of California-Santa Barbara — if you switch the players. As seen in a video at the YouTube site of the Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust (warning: profanity), a UCSB associate professor took a sign away from a participant in a campus pro-life outreach effort. Flanked by two students, she took the sign back to her office and destroyed it. Now feminist studies Associate Professor Mireille Miller-Young "is facing vandalism, battery, and robbery charges." The UCSB incident has, as far as I can tell, despite the prof's utter lack of contrition, has gone virtually uncovered by the establishment press. The related police report follows the jump:

By Jeffrey Meyer | March 17, 2014 | 2:25 PM EDT

MSNBC’s anti-gun agenda has made its way to its online site MSNBC.com when Krystal Ball, co-host of “The Cycle” penned a piece on Monday March 17 bemoaning how the NRA supposedly “shoots down a qualified Obama nominee.”

The nominee in question is Dr. Vivek Murthy, President Obama’s pick to be the nation’s next surgeon general, and far from just a doctor. Despite his questionable credentials , Ball lamented how Obama’s nominee “was in danger because Murthy has advocated gun safety and linked public health to gun violence."

By Tim Graham | March 15, 2014 | 9:01 PM EDT

This week, Politico media reporter Mackenzie Weinger revealed a powerful new tool in the Left’s social-media sandbox: the website Upworthy.com, founded in March 2012 by former MoveOn executive director Eli Pariser and former Onion managing editor Chris Koechley (also a MoveOn veteran).

Touting itself as “social media with a mission,” Upworthy has “drawn big traffic – about 53 million visitors in February — with sharing-friendly content. And it does its news aggregation with a point of view that is decidedly progressive and left-wing.”

By Tom Blumer | March 14, 2014 | 8:12 PM EDT

In a late Friday afternoon release, the U.S. Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced its intent "to transition key Internet domain name functions to the global multistakeholder community." The statement is full of the kind of dense bureaucratic language one tends to see when the agency is doing something really important but controversial.

Stating the situation more clearly, TheDomains.com calls it "the Offical Statement Of The US Giving Up Control Over ICANN" (The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers). Americans for Limited Government has issued a press release "blasting the Obama Commerce Department for turning over control of the Internet to United Nations International Telecommunication Union." The one story in the press as of 7:30 p.m. was at the Politico, whose Erin Mershon appears to have caught wind of the news ahead of NTIA's release. Mershon takes eight paragraphs to tell readers to whom the functions are to be transitioned — and I don't think her dallying is mere sloppiness (bolds are mine):

By Tom Blumer | March 14, 2014 | 4:13 PM EDT

Washington Post "Fact Checker" blogger Glenn Kessler has given "Four Pinocchios" ("a whopper") to a pro-Democratic group's political ad opposing the U.S. Senate candidacy of Louisiana Republican Bill Cassidy. The claim: The Koch Brothers, who are prominent financial supporters of the pro-GOP group Americans for Prosperity, want to protect, in the ad's words, “tax cuts for companies that ship our jobs overseas.”

Unfortunately, I have been told that Kessler's post did not make the paper's print edition; to no one's surprise, the Post has a tendency to give Kessler posts which fact-check Republicans greater print edition visibility. Additionally, at least one other Post writer and career race-baiter Al Sharpton have praised the anti-Koch ad and the strategy behind it. The likelihood that either will acknowledge Kessler's debunking is extremely low. Here are the key paragraphs from Kessler's work (bolds are mine throughout this post):