Blogs

By Tom Blumer | November 11, 2014 | 8:50 PM EST

Far be it from me to talk a leftist columnist out of an ignorant, self-satisfied position which might, if anything, cause his fellow travelers to hit the accelerator a little less aggressively in future political campaigns.

At the Atlantic on Monday afternoon, Richard Reeves, policy director of the Center on Children and Families at the Brookings Institution, claimed that the left shouldn't be so glum after Tuesday's election results, because "progressive policies are working." His very first graph makes a mockery of his claim:

By Tom Blumer | November 11, 2014 | 4:31 PM EST

David Weigel's writeup this afternoon at Bloomberg Politics ("Meet the Mild-Mannered Investment Advisor Who's Humiliating the Administration Over Obamacare") is about the guy who has found at least two incriminating videos of Jonathan Gruber revealing the true intentions behind the Affordable Care Act. In some respects, it's well done and interesting.

What's not well done is Bloomberg's choice of the pull quote to highlight:

By Jeffrey Meyer | November 11, 2014 | 1:38 PM EST

With the GOP set to officially take control of the United States Senate in January, Politico decided it was the perfect time to play up Democrats’ criticism of Senator Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.), incoming Chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, for being “the Hill’s most flamboyant critic of climate research.” In a piece published on November 10, authors Elana Schor and Alexander Burns promoted how “Democrats aspire to make Inhofe the face of GOP knownothingism, while at least one Republican consultant says his style of skepticism could create headaches for candidates up and down the ticket in 2016.” 

By Tom Blumer | November 11, 2014 | 10:26 AM EST

A Sunday Associated Press item carried at its national news site informs readers that the town of Westminster in north central Massachusetts is seriously considering a ban on tobacco products. The Boston Globe covered the story in a lengthy report on October 28, and the Washington Post carried a brief item at its GovBeat blog that same day.

None of those three items addressed an obvious question: If it's okay to ban the sale of a product primarily on the basis of the harm it causes when smoked, what is the justification for legalizing marijuana throughout Massachusetts and elsewhere? Many Bay State observers believe, based on the number of nonbinding referenda passed and the changing public mood, that pot legalization is perhaps two years away.

By Tom Blumer | November 10, 2014 | 10:49 PM EST

When I saw this item, I thought to myself: "Imagine the ridicule which would shower down on a Republican or conservative presidential administration if they did something so obviously childish and clumsy." But since a Democratic administration is involved, it will more than likely get scant attention or be totally ignored.

What I'm referring to is the White House's inclusion of an artifical "buffering" clip during the first three or so seconds before President Obama's two-minute message advocating regulating the Internet as if it's a public utility. Video follows the jump:

By Tom Blumer | November 9, 2014 | 10:40 AM EST

Saturday morning, Erica Werner at the Associated Press, aka the Administratino's Press, channeled her inner Nancy Cordes to play "gotcha" with Republicans who won election to the House on Tuesday.

Werner's report essentially regurgitated Cordes's petulance in the CBS reporter's question directed at House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday. Cordes identified supposedly stupid or ill-advised things some of the incoming freshmen have said in the past, while of course not identifying a single similar thing a sitting Democratic Party congressman has said on the floor of the House or in House committee hearings during their tenures. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tom Blumer | November 8, 2014 | 11:11 PM EST

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Aaron R. Hanlon, an infrequent columnnist at Salon, both have an excuse for Democrats' poor performance in this year's midterm elections: pervasive voter suppression.

You see, the left's new working definition of "voter suppression" — a definition which is never a subject of establishment press scrutiny — is apparently the following: "Many of the people who would ordinarily support us didn't register to vote, and many of our supporters who did register didn't bother to cast a ballot. Ergo, their vote was suppressed."

By Tom Blumer | November 7, 2014 | 10:52 PM EST

A search at the Associated Press's national site tonight on "Berlin Wall" (not in quotes) returns 14 stories.

Changing that search to "Berlin Wall Reagan" reduces that number to one. That single story is a short, seven-paragraph item about sections of the wall which are on display in different parts of the world. Reagan's name gets mentioned as follows:

By Tom Blumer | November 7, 2014 | 3:27 PM EST

The delusion is strong with this one.

On Friday's Morning Joe program on what remains of MSNBC, Al Sharpton, completely ignoring how late appearances in Maryland and Illinois by President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle coincided with significant deterioration in the situations of Democratic Party gubernatorial candidates in Maryland and Illinois, blamed Bill and Hillary Clinton, and not the Obamas, for Tuesday's Democratic debacle.

By Tom Blumer | November 6, 2014 | 5:50 PM EST

Wednesday afternoon, supposed polling genius Nate Silver tweeted that "Turnout was down from 2010 in almost every state."

Silver's readers and clients had better hope that Silver is usually better at counting — and analysis (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Blumer | November 5, 2014 | 11:33 PM EST

Participation in youth football is down. As economic ignoramus David Leonhardt of the New York Times explained yesterday at the paper's "The Upshot" blog, this is particularly pronounced in "the highly educated Democratic-leaning areas of major metropolitan areas."

Yesterday, as he was interviewing Leonhardt about his post on NPR's "The Takeaway" program, John Hockenberry asked, "Are you suggesting that Republicans are pro-concussion?" Audio follows the jump:

By Tom Blumer | October 31, 2014 | 5:59 PM EDT

New Jersey Governor Christie rebuked a heckler during his visit to the area affected by Superstorm Sandy on Wednesday.

His rebuke is still a major headline item at ... the Weather Channel. The headline ("Gov Loses It During Speech") also makes a claim not supported by the circumstances, or Christie's history of dealng with such critics: