By Tom Blumer | June 23, 2016 | 1:37 PM EDT

Though their report covering Donald Trump's Wednesday speech criticizing presumptive Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton's record has undergone subsequent revisions, the coverage of that speech by the Associated Press's Julie Pace and Jill Colvin has stuck with two common themes. One is that prospective Republican nominee Donald Trump has "struggled with the transition to a general election race, getting bogged down by self-created controversies." The fact is that the "controversies," especially the one over Trump supposedly claiming that President Barack Obama was, in media-speak, "involved" with the June 13 terrorist massacre of 49 in Orlando, Florida, are almost entirely press-invented creations and distortions of what Trump has actually said.

The other AP theme which has survived frequent revisions is the idea that criticisms of Hillary Clinton, especially if made by Trump or other opponents, can be readily flicked away if they have been "widely questioned," meaning in practice that a few Clinton acolytes can merely say that "these people are wrong," and that's the end of it. The double standard could hardly be more blatant.

By Tom Blumer | June 22, 2016 | 11:46 PM EDT

Here's a new item for the sarcasm-laden "Our country is in the very best of hands" stack of embarrassments Instapundit's Glenn Reynolds has been accumulating during the past several years. The headline at media aggregator Grabien.com is: "AG LYNCH ADMITS THE FBI HAS LOST TRACK OF OMAR MATEEN’S WIFE."

If this admission had occurred during any non-leftist presidential administration, the establishment press would jump at the chance to publish and broadcast embarrassing law enforcement news such as this far and wide. But in this case, a review of stories at the Associated Press's main national site, its Big Story site, and at the New York Times found no indication that the nation's two primary establishment news gatekeepers have noted Attorney General Lynch's admission concerning Noor Salman, the wife of Orlando massacre terrorist Omar Mateen.

By Tom Blumer | June 20, 2016 | 5:52 PM EDT

The establishment press is thrilled over the City of Philadelphia's enactment of a 1.5 cents-per-ounce "soda tax" last week. Monday morning, Mayor Jim Kenney signed the legislation which its City Council passed last week.

Especially unseemly is the virtual euphoria over how so-called "public health" advocates gained their long-sought foothold into using the tax system to dictate personal behavior over (eventually) any and all food and beverage products it doesn't like. Instead of making the "we know better" nanny-state arguments which really form the foundation of their effort, the press is applauding Mayor Kenney for, in the words of New York Times reporter Margot Sanger-Katz, portraying "the soft drink industry as a tantalizing revenue source that could be tapped to fund popular city programs, including universal prekindergarten."

By Tom Blumer | June 19, 2016 | 10:45 PM EDT

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced on NBC's Meet the Press and the other Sunday morning TV talk shows that on Monday, the Department of Justice will release "partial" transcripts of phone conversations between law enforcement and Omar Mateen on June 12 during his terrorist massacre in Orlando, Florida.

Asked why the transcripts would only be partial, Lynch told MTP host Chuck Todd that "what we're not going to do is further proclaim this individual's pledges of allegiance to terrorist groups and further his propaganda."

By Tom Blumer | June 18, 2016 | 2:14 PM EDT

On May 1, the Washington Post's Jackson Diehl warned: "We ignore Venezuela’s imminent implosion at our peril," noting that the South American nation of 30 million "has descended into a dystopia where food, medicine, water and electric power are critically scarce." Given the dire humanitarian crisis which has enveloped that country, broadcast media coverage during the ensuing seven weeks, particularly on the Big Three networks, has been sparse to non-existent.

Yesterday, as Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Dodgers faced the Milwaukee Brewers in LA, legendary Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully, in a 20-second monologue between pitches, did more to substantively educate his audience about the tragic reality in Venezuela than most of the U.S. press has done in months (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Blumer | June 17, 2016 | 11:36 AM EDT

At the New York Times, Margot Sanger-Katz is the paper's "domestic correspondent" who "writes about health care" for its "The Upshot" blog. That blog in turn is supposed to cover "politics, economics and everyday life." 

In heralding the passage of a 1.5-cent per ounce tax on soda in Philadelphia yesterday as some sort of historic "watershed" accomplishment, Sanger-Katz betrayed an incredible level of ignorance of both economics and everyday life. Incredibly (well, almost), she treated the matter of whether sugary soda drinkers will see price increases at the cash register because of the new tax as something that is in doubt: "If passed on to consumers, the increase is expected to substantially reduce sales of sweetened drinks." "If"?

By Tom Blumer | June 17, 2016 | 9:00 AM EDT

In the course of presenting what is apparently one story in a series of several on a "Divided America," David Bauder at the Associated Press portrayed two Americans with largely different news consumption habits. Though the theme of Bauder's Thursday morning report was about how Americans are "retreat(ing) into tribes of like-minded people who get news filtered through particular world views," the two people he presented "don't rely exclusively on partisan media," and go elsewhere "to hear opposing viewpoints." This essentially contradicted his attempted primary point, which is that Americans are supposedly, as his story's headline reads, "Constructing our own intellectual ghettos."

By Tom Blumer | June 15, 2016 | 11:44 AM EDT

One of the more important elements of the establishment press's daily routine is protecting leftists, particularly members of the Obama administration, when they say really dumb things. They do this by not reporting them.

Reacting to Tuesday afternoon reports that Russian hackers have successfully breached the Democratic National Committee's computer network and stolen files, particularly the "entire file" of opposition research on presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest childishly blamed congressional Republicans. Yeah, really. If a White House spokesman attempted something this absurd during a Republican or conservative administration, it would already have been the subject of jokes on Tuesday's late-night TV shows. Naturally, Earnest's idiocy has only been documented at a few center-right blogs and outlets.

By Tom Blumer | June 14, 2016 | 1:26 PM EDT

As Scott Whitlock at NewsBusters noted Monday afternoon, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has revoked the Washington Post's press credentials for covering his campaign. Trump took special umbrage to the following headline at Jenna Johnson's coverage of Trump's reactions to the terrorist massacre in Orlando: "Donald Trump suggests President Obama was involved with Orlando shooting." The Post, claiming it did so before Trump made his move, is now carrying this revised headline: "Donald Trump seems to connect President Obama to Orlando shooting." The trouble is, Johnson's content, which deliberately injected scurrilous meaning which was not present into Trump's comments, still makes the allegation contained in the earlier headline.

By Tom Blumer | June 13, 2016 | 6:05 PM EDT

In his second speech on Sunday morning's terrorist massacre in Orlando, Florida, President Barack Obama said on Monday that "the shooter was inspired by various extremist information that was disseminated over the Internet," that "we see no clear evidence that he was directed externally," and that "this is certainly an example of the kind of homegrown extremism that all of us have been so concerned about for a very long time."

The press, led as usual by the Associated Press, is certainly cooperating with those characterizations. Presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has clearly made up her mind that Omar Mateen committed a "lone wolf" attack, and that banning "assault weapons" would somehow prevent future such attacks. The problem, of course, is what one means by "homegrown" and "directed."

By Tom Blumer | June 12, 2016 | 5:50 PM EDT

Imam Muhammad Musri, the president and senior imam of the Islamic Society of Central Florida, made a statement to reporters Sunday morning at 10:32 a.m. Eastern Time.

Jim Hoft at Gateway Pundit reports that "This was the first press conference held by Orlando officials after the massacre," and that "No Christian or Jewish leaders were invited to speak to reporters." Curious reporters, assuming there are still any out there, should wonder, if religious beliefs had nothing to do with Omar Mateen's terrorist killing spree, why a representative from just one religion would be present to comment.

By Tom Blumer | June 12, 2016 | 12:13 PM EDT

Hours after this morning's massacre in Orlando, Florida, the Associated Press is already brandishing the gun-control agenda.

In a report with a time stamp of 9:16 a.m. Eastern Time, the AP, with its list apparently always at the ready, gave the following headline to its rundown of "some of the nation's deadliest rampages since 2012": "Florida nightclub attack just the latest US mass shooting." In other words, Dear Reader, while we're busy minimizing the larger significance of the massacre, we want to make sure you understand that events such as these will continue to occur as long as guns are available.