Blogs

By Tom Blumer | December 10, 2014 | 11:58 AM EST

Yesterday at 4:11 p.m. ET, Eugene Volokh at the Washington Post's Volokh Conspiracy blog sharply criticized Time.com's Eliza Berman for not being "quite fair" — i.e., being quite unfair, given the author's penchant for understatement — to Breitbart.com's John Nolte, the reporter who investigated the veracity of Lena Dunham's detailed claims about and descriptions of her alleged Oberlin College rapist.

Volokh's critique was based on language in Berman's original writeup which Time pulled at some point after Volokh's post without any notice that it had done so. Berman, as Volokh noted, "casually dismiss(ed) an investigation ... that actually succeeded in getting a publisher to correct a statement," and in the process betrayed fundamental tenets of journalism as it's supposed to be practiced.

By Tom Blumer | December 10, 2014 | 12:31 AM EST

It's more than fair to wonder why the Associated Press waited until 9:41 p.m. ET Tuesday evening to recognize the existence of Lena Dunham's most recent problems with the truth.

The AP's first recognition of the days-old story came roughly two hours after Dunham's first detailed response to convincing allegations that the account in her most recent book of being raped in college by someone named "Barry" can't possibly relate to any real human being here on earth. The AP's delay, and the slovenly unbylined report it has filed, opens the wire service up to allegations that it has chosen to participate in a coordinated attempt to pull Dunham's keister out of the fire.

By Mark Finkelstein | December 8, 2014 | 9:15 AM EST

Michael Tomasky is not content to argue, in the wake of Mary Landrieu's defeat, that Democrats should write off the South as politically unfriendly territory.  In his Daily Beast item of today, Tomasky goes to great lengths to trash the region in the ugliest of terms.

"Reactionary, prejudice-infested, fetid, reject[ing] nearly everything that’s good about this country, just one big nuclear waste site of choleric, and extremely racialized, resentment," is how Tomasky slurs most of the South, saying "almost the entire region" is as he describes it. 

By Tom Blumer | December 7, 2014 | 10:35 AM EST

In the Rolling Stone-University of Virginia fraternity gang-rape saga, National Review's Jonah Goldberg's journalistic instincts expressed in his December 1 Los Angeles Times column ("Rolling Stone rape story sends shock waves -- and stretches credulity") obviously ran circles around Los Angeles Times op-ed columnist Diana Crandall's.

On December 3, shortly before the story imploded, Crandall went after Goldberg with a vengeance for supposedly "being out of touch with college realities" and for writing the kind of column which "prevents rape victims from coming forward" (bolds and numbereed tags are mine):

By Tom Blumer | December 6, 2014 | 9:12 AM EST

The straw man argument is a fundamentally dishonest fallback tactic employed by someone whose side is losing a debate: Make up a position the other side has never taken, and then shoot it down.

The leftist fever swamp known as Vox, perhaps reacting to the utter implosion of Rolling Stone's University of Virginia fraternity gang-rape story and the potential impact it might have on keeping universities from imposing due process-denying regimes on campus, has produced a graphic employing that tactic against the apparent hordes of Americans who think that rape "isn't a real issue in America" (HT Twitchy):

By Tom Blumer | December 4, 2014 | 12:26 AM EST

Continuing a nearly six-month pattern, the nation's establishment press ignored today's arraignment of pioneering homosexual activist, major Obama campaign bundler and Democrat "kingmaker" Terry Bean in Lane County, Oregon "on two charges of third-degree sodomy, a felony, and sexual abuse in the third degree, a misdemeanor."

A Google News search on Bean's full name during the past 24 hours done at 11 PM ET returned 24 items. Over a dozen of them linked to Michelle Malkin's latest syndicated column decrying the press's disgraceful double standards in covering matters such as these. Most of the remaining results were reports found at Oregon media outlets. One interesting exception was at, of all places, EDGE.

By Tom Blumer | December 3, 2014 | 5:41 PM EST

Apparently someone at USA Today was either mad as all get out and wanted to make sure its readers knew about today's news item relating to a policeman killing a suspect, or that person fell asleep with their finger on the "Send" button.

Yours truly received four emails between 2:36 and 2:37 PM telling me that New York City Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo will not be charged in the death of Eric Garner:

By Tom Blumer | December 2, 2014 | 10:56 PM EST

At the Washington Post, there is apparently not a darned thing going on in any foreign country that can't wait until Elizabeth Lauten's life is completely turned upside-down.

That's what one must conclude, given that the paper, taking the already well-documented media obsession with Lauten to a new level, tasked foreign affairs writer — that's right, foreign affairs writer — Terrence McCoy with generating an 860-word hit piece on Lauten's life going back to her teenage years.

By Tom Blumer | December 2, 2014 | 5:27 PM EST

Earlier today, according to several center-right and zero establishment press outlets thus far (based on an appropriate Google News search done just before 5 PM ET), White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said that President Obama was only speaking "colloquially" when he told hecklers in an audience in Chicago last week that "I took action to change the law" in his November 20 announcement on immigration.

Video follows the jump (HT National Review):

By Tom Blumer | December 2, 2014 | 1:41 PM EST

Certain members of Congress abused their positions Monday to imply that "Hands up, don't shoot" was something Michael Brown actually said before he was killed by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri in August.

On Friday, the Associated Press irresponsibly gave voice to those who say that the slogan is now a "metaphor" for police brutality targeted against blacks, even though the claim that Michael Brown did or said any such thing has been completely discredited by the physical evidence and the grand jury's credible witnesses. In covering the congressional histrionics, Lucy McCalmont at the Politico, aka Pathetico (HT Seton Motley) took things to the next level.

By Matthew Balan | December 2, 2014 | 1:13 PM EST

The liberal media has heavily covered the aftermath of the grand jury finding no grounds to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting of Michael Brown. Many of the protests decrying this decision have used the slogan "black lives matter." On Monday, The Daily Caller spotlighted how a Planned Parenthood Twitter account got on the bandwagon with the #blacklivesmatter hashtag. The site underlined the "cruelly ironic" nature of the abortion giant's Tweet, given the pro-abortion Guttmacher Institute's 2008 finding that "black and Hispanic women were overrepresented" among those who had abortions.

By Tom Blumer | December 1, 2014 | 2:44 PM EST

A week ago, New Orleans Saints tight end Benjamin Watson put up a Facebook post reacting to events in Ferguson, Missouri. It has generated an astonishing 825,000 likes and 458,000 shares as of 1 PM ET today.

As will be seen later, CNN's print report on Watson's post by Steve Almasy treated the player's references to sin, Jesus Christ, and the Gospel as if they were potentially toxic. Additionally, the accompanying CNN video at Almasy's writeup doesn't show how the conversation between Watson and the network's Brooke Baldwin really ended, i.e., very abruptly.