All Things Considered

By Matthew Balan | September 23, 2014 | 6:38 PM EDT

NPR's Jason Beaubien spotlighted a woman's "nightmare with El Salvador's abortion law" on Monday's All Things Considered. Beaubien zeroed in on the case of Christina Quintanilla, who served four years of a thirty-year prison sentence, after a dubious conviction for the death of her unborn child. He also cited unnamed "activists who are pushing to liberalize El Salvador's abortion law [who] argue that the total ban is unjust because it only applies to the poor."

By Tim Graham | September 19, 2014 | 2:42 PM EDT

On Tuesday night’s All Things Considered, NPR anchor Robert Siegel awarded a seven-and-a-half minute interview to The New Republic and its editor, Franklin Foer. The magazine is celebrating its 100th anniversary with a new book called “Insurrections of the Mind.”

Siegel found time to ask about a Hendrik Hertzberg book review trashing Ronald Reagan as a “child monarch,” which he described as a “scathing and very amusing read.” He also brought up  a Henry Fairlie piece eviscerating George Will, which Siegel called “another very amusing piece.” But he never found time to discuss the New Republic’s enormous scandal with writer Stephen Glass's slew of wildly fabricated articles in the magazine from 1995 to 1998, memorialized in the movie "Shattered Glass.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | September 19, 2014 | 12:35 PM EDT

Talk about tone deaf at National Public Radio. On Thursday’s All Things Considered, NPR reporter Don Gonyea ran a segment on Governor Chris Christie (R-N.J.) traveling to New Hampshire to campaign with Scott Brown as he seeks to become the next senator from there. 

Unsurprisingly, the NPR reporter did his best to play up the “Bridgegate” controversy despite the Department of Justice clearing Christie of any wrongdoing in the 2013 George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal. The accompanying story on the NPR website blared “Will bridge scandal jam Gov. Christie’s road show?” 

By Tim Graham | August 24, 2014 | 8:51 AM EDT

NPR is again feeling Barack Obama’s pain, with a Friday All Things Considered story they headlined “For Obama, August Is the Cruelest Month.” Even the French are mocking his time off. The media now insist Obama is victimized by bad news, not that he's done anything wrong that would create bad news.

His approval ratings are lowest in August, suggested NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley, but never fear, “the President's numbers have tended to rebound soon after Labor Day.”  Horsley insisted that Obama has vacationed far less than George W. Bush:

By Jeffrey Meyer | July 16, 2014 | 2:55 PM EDT

It seems as though National Public Radio has joined the ranks of the liberal media championing illegal immigrant Jose Antonio Vargas following his arrest on Tuesday, July 15 for attempting to board a plane without proper documentation. 

That evening, NPR’s All Things Considered did its best to promote Vargas, with co-host Audie Cornish and media correspondent David Folkenflik engaging in a cheerleading session for the illegal immigrant. Cornish began the segment by lamenting how Vargas is “a Filipino without legal status in the U.S., though he has lived in this country for more than 20 years.” [Click here to listen to the MP3 audio.] 

By Tim Graham | July 11, 2014 | 8:13 AM EDT

NPR got in the spirit of anniversaries on Thursday night’s All Things Considered by recalling the 1964 Republican convention in San Francisco. For analysis, they turned to.....New York Times Magazine contributor Sam Tanenhaus, whose lack of political insight was proven by his 2009 book The Death of Conservatism (broadened from a 2009 New Republic essay titled "Conservatism Is Dead.")  Oopsy.

Tanenhaus told NPR anchor Robert Siegel that when Nelson Rockefeller tried to argue against “extremism” at the convention, leftist author Norman Mailer wrote it was like “one of those early moments at the dawn of civilization when one caveman stood off the others and said no, we have to be a civilized society.”

By Tim Graham | July 6, 2014 | 11:08 PM EDT

Jay Carney is doing a round of interviews fresh out of the White House. In The New York Times Magazine, Jim Rutenberg threw briefing-room softballs like this: “Do people in the first row like to showboat?”

Carney said yes: “If you look at the difference in tenor between the on-camera briefings and the on-the-record-but-off-camera gaggles, it’s night and day.” That’s not just due to the TV audience, it’s due to the idea that gaggles are more designed to set up the briefing and the day’s coverage. In this and other interviews, Carney tries sneakily to dismiss the idea that Obama didn’t live up to hise pledge to be transparent.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | June 14, 2014 | 8:01 AM EDT

Now that our cultural elites feel they have sufficiently educated the public on the virtues of gays and lesbians, it’s time to drill down to the next level. Here comes transgenderism. Time magazine placed  “Orange Is the New Black” star Laverne Cox (born as Charles Cox) on the cover as the face of “The Transgender Tipping Point: America’s Next Civil Rights Frontier.”

Cox wrote on Facebook that the Time cover was a wonderful present on his birthday and "I realize this is way bigger than me and about a tipping point in our nation's history where it is no longer acceptable for trans lives to be stigmatized, ridiculed, criminalized and disregarded.’

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | June 14, 2014 | 8:01 AM EDT

Now that our cultural elites feel they have sufficiently educated the public on the virtues of gays and lesbians, it’s time to drill down to the next level. Here comes transgenderism. Time magazine placed  “Orange Is the New Black” star Laverne Cox (born as Charles Cox) on the cover as the face of “The Transgender Tipping Point: America’s Next Civil Rights Frontier.”

Cox wrote on Facebook that the Time cover was a wonderful present on his birthday and "I realize this is way bigger than me and about a tipping point in our nation's history where it is no longer acceptable for trans lives to be stigmatized, ridiculed, criminalized and disregarded.’

By Jeffrey Meyer | May 22, 2014 | 2:14 PM EDT

It’s been over a month but NPR has finally decided that the Benghazi scandal is worth covering. On Wednesday, May 21 House Democrats chose five members of Congres to participate in the House Select Committee on Benghazi and NPR’s Morning Edition covered the story on Thursday, May 22. NPR didn’t bother giving full a news report to the actual formation of the Select Committee, but deemed the Democratic response worthy of full coverage. 

The latest NPR story was the first full news story to air on Benghazi since an April 3. In fact, since February 26, NPR has only aired two full news reports and one news brief on the subject.

By Jeffrey Meyer | May 13, 2014 | 11:08 AM EDT

NPR’s weekday All Things Considered news program has followed the ranks of liberal news outlets promoting the latest global warming alarming on its airwaves. Following a new report released by NASA, NPR was in panic mode over the dire situation facing our planet in the coming centuries. 

During a Monday, May 12 segment, NPR co-host Melissa Block worried that “Antarctica is covered with the biggest mass of ice on Earth. The part of the ice sheath that's over West Antarctica is thought to be especially vulnerable to climate change. Scientists now say a slow collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet is both underway and irreversible.” [Listen to the MP3 audio here.]  

By Tim Graham | May 13, 2014 | 7:18 AM EDT

PBS NewsHour analyst Mark Shields started with an admission on Benghazi on Friday night: “Has the White House been transparent? Absolutely not.”

But he lamented that the House special committee hearings “will be a disaster. It won’t be good for the country.” It’s only being done for the Tea Party and Fox News. Apparently, hearings are only productive and wonderful when run by liberal Democrats like Henry Waxman: