By Tom Johnson | March 16, 2016 | 9:29 PM EDT

Daily Kos writer Hunter is amazed at the ongoing failure of supposedly influential Republicans to understand that as far as the party base is concerned, Donald Trump’s “racism and sexism and conspiracy theories” are features, not bugs. The peg for Hunter’s Monday post was a new TV ad from the GOP-friendly Our Principles PAC which quotes a slew of the degrading comments Trump has made about women.

“This fine group of Republican party stalwarts does deserve some kudos for their late-in-the-day attempts to walk the party back from the brink of Trumpism so they can snuggle back into the warm embrace of a Ted Cruz theocracy or a Marco Rubio, Paul Ryan-style feeding of the poor into wood chippers,” allowed Hunter. “But that doesn’t mean any of it is going to work. Trump has given the conservative base a taste of what they could have…and who knows if they'll settle for merely shutting down the government in Cruzian tantrums.”

By Mark Finkelstein | February 24, 2016 | 7:08 AM EST

Have you seen the GE commercial? Millenial son informs mom and dad that he has gotten a job at GE. Old-fashioned dad is enthusiastic: "proud of you, son. GE! Manufacturing!" He hands son "granpappy's" heavy old hammer. Son gently explains that rather than building "powerful machines," he'll be writing computer code. Disappointed dad: "he can't lift the hammer." Mom, with more compassion than conviction in her voice, consoles son: "it's okay though: you're gonna change the world."

On today's Morning JoeMika Brzezinski used that "change the world" line to mock Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz in the face of their underwhelming performance in the Nevada caucuses, in which Donald Trump exceeded their combined vote total. Rubbing it in, Mika also echoed dad's dagger: "they can't lift the hammer." Dr. Freud, care to explain the symbolism?

By Cal Thomas | February 10, 2016 | 5:24 PM EST

In a day when the most innocuous thing can quickly become political, a Doritos Super Bowl commercial has upset some people who want abortion to be an unrestricted right.

By Katie Yoder | February 8, 2016 | 2:46 PM EST

Note to NARAL: It’s bad when even the liberal media stop seeing eye-to-eye with you on abortion.

During their Monday broadcast morning news shows, ABC, CBS and NBC reviewed the Super Bowl 50 commercials from the night before. While a pro-choice group erupted over a Doritos “Ultrasound” ad that “humanized fetuses,” the networks heralded it as a “favorite” and online stories found it “hilarious.”

By Jack Coleman | February 8, 2016 | 12:23 PM EST

Even by the ever-shifting rhetorical standards of pro-abortion liberals, this one is conspicuously tone deaf.

As soon as you saw that Doritos ad during last night's Super Bowl game, you knew it would lead to an unhinged response from abortion apologists. That it did, and then some.
 

By Mark Finkelstein | December 13, 2015 | 9:14 PM EST

What's been implicit in TV commercials for years—that American husbands are feckless wimps—has now become explicit . . . 

Tuning in to watch a simple Sunday Night Football game, we were treated to a Kia ad. Wife at the wheel as the family pulls into a crowded parking lot for their boy's football gameWimpy husband suggests they go back and park someplace safe. We get to read the wife's mind as, driving it up a hill, she says "or, we could run it right up the gut." She then adds the coup de grace: "someone's got to wear the pants in this family." Take that!

By Tom Johnson | November 8, 2015 | 5:14 PM EST

Many products long not advertised on television now are commonly promoted during ad breaks. Writer Danielle Campoamor would like to add one more type of commercial to that list.

“Why is it that I never see an ad for abortion services?” wondered Campoamor in a Sunday piece. “Why are we willing to use women’s bodies in ads, but rarely see ads that would benefit women’s bodies?...Society has manipulated abortion and the way in which it is viewed, changing it from a medical procedure to an exhausted topic of debate.”

By Kristine Marsh | September 15, 2015 | 10:45 AM EDT

Editor's Note: See Update Below

Sincerely-held religious beliefs are now the butt of a joke for one major brand.

Tide laundry detergent recently released a commercial poking fun at Christians who still hold to that “old-fashioned” belief that marriage should be between one man and one woman. You know, those “silly” families who have lost their businesses, fought long legal battles or resigned from their jobs for refusing to endorse a same-sex wedding.

By Kristine Marsh | June 22, 2015 | 12:28 PM EDT

In a bizarre move, Angel Soft toilet paper ran an ad this past Sunday wishing moms a “Happy Father’s Day.” The ad featured men and women telling their stories, through tears, of how their moms had to be “both parents” while raising their family by themselves.

It’s hard to fault the sweet stories told in the commercial of single moms raising their kids, but surely this ad could’ve been run on Mother’s Day?

By Kristine Marsh | June 16, 2015 | 1:57 PM EDT

What does yogurt have to do with gay sex? I don’t know but Chobani wants you to make the association. With the mania over all things LGBT in the media, advertisers have begun making more commercials portraying same-sex couples and families. Chobani Yogurt just put out a new ad that some would say pushes the envelope in appropriateness.

By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2015 | 2:36 PM EDT

Rush Limbaugh posted an interesting pair of questions at his web site yesterday: "How can CNN still be on the air with no audience? How can MSNBC have been on the air with no audience? In the old days, they're gone, kaput. Something else is tried. But they stay. And they double down on what they're doing that's losing audience."

A large part of the answer, as I noted on March 30, is that those two networks apparently have suffered very little financially as they have lost audience. That's because, as is apparently the case with most of the major cable channels, their primary source of revenue comes from "subscriptions," also referred to as "carriage fees" or "license fee revenues." In plain English, cable channels get paid a great deal of money even if nobody watches them, and don't benefit as much as would be expected when their audience grows.

By Ken Shepherd | April 23, 2015 | 4:12 PM EDT

This Friday, April 24, will mark 100 years since the beginning of the Armenian genocide at the hands of the Ottoman government in what is present-day Turkey. The Washington Post apparently saw it a fitting occasion to accept a full-page A-section advertisement by an organization which essentially denies the holocaust of millions of Armenians by the Turks.